Saskatoon, Canada
Saskatoon, Canada

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The present invention relates to transgenic plants comprising a plurality of nucleic acids heterologous to said plant, each of said nucleic acid comprising a coding sequence operably linked to one or more regulatory elements for directing expression of said coding sequence in said plant, said nucleic acid being stably integrated at or adjacent to rDNA sequences, or a seed, organ, tissue, part or cell thereof, or a descendant of said plant, seed, organ, tissue, part or cell; methods of producing the transgenic plants; and methods of producing oil using the transgenic plants.


Zhang Y.,Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Center | Zhang Y.,Shanghai Institute of Biological Science | Itaya A.,Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Center | Fu P.,Agrisoma Biosciences Inc. | And 8 more authors.
Plant Biotechnology | Year: 2013

A system for engineering plant chromosomes has been developed to facilitate the introduction of novel genes into the plant genome. The system is based on the establishment of a unique genetic locus within the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) region of the host chromosome to provide a permissive environment for expression of the introduced genes of interest (GOI). The genetic locus can exist within an independent, fully functional "minichromosome" (MC) or as a segment of a modified host chromosome (termed Engineered Trait Locus or ETL). The site-specific integration of transgenes to the rDNA locus isolates them from other endogenous genes, an advantage over conventional transformation in which foreign genes are inserted randomly into the host genome. Furthermore, MCs or ETLs can confer stability and high expression of the transgenes, as demonstrated in mammalian systems. To evaluate this system in plants, several MC and ETL lines have been generated in soybean, an important crop used worldwide for protein and oil consumption. The characterization of a soybean line containing an MC demonstrates that 1) the MC is stable over multiple generations as well as in field conditions, 2) maintaining the MC has no adverse phenotypic consequences, and 3) the MC can provide high-level expression of the introduced GOI. © 2013 The Japanese Society for Plant Cell and Molecular Biology.


Waterer D.,University of Saskatchewan | Benning N.T.,University of Saskatchewan | Wu G.,Bioriginal Food and Science Corporation | Luo X.,Agrisoma Biosciences Inc. | And 4 more authors.
Molecular Breeding | Year: 2010

Abiotic stresses such as drought and extremes of temperature commonly reduce both yield and quality of potato. This study investigated the potential to use gene transfer technology to enhance the tolerance of potato to commonly encountered abiotic stresses. Agrobacterium mediated transformation was used to create lines of potato (cv. Desiree) that overexpressed either a wheat mitochondrial Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD3:1), dehydrin 4 (DHN 4) isolated from barley, a cold-inducible transcriptional factor DREB/CBF1 isolated from canola or ROB5, a stress inducible gene isolated from bromegrass that encodes for a heat stable LEA group 3-like protein. The transgenes were under the control of either a constitutive 35S promoter or a stress-induced Arabidopsis COR78 promoter. Yield potential of the transformed lines was evaluated under drought stress conditions in a greenhouse trial and under non-irrigated conditions in field trials conducted over 4 years in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. In the years when the field trials experienced significant drought stress (2001, 2003 and 2006) many of the transformed lines produced higher yields than the control. However, under relatively cooler, wetter conditions (2005 cropping season) yields of most transformed lines were equivalent or inferior to the non-transformed parental line. Under non-stressed conditions, transformations utilizing the stress-induced COR78 promoter were higher yielding than transformations based on the constitutive 35S promoter. Combining the ROB5, DHN or SOD3.1 transgenes with the COR78 promoter all showed significant potential to enhance yields under moisture stress. All of the transgenes appeared to enhance the heat stress tolerance (44°C) of whole plants or excised leaves, with lines transformed with SOD3.1 showing the greatest effect. In low temperature stress trials conducted under controlled environment conditions and in the field, lines over-expressing SOD3:1 showed an enhanced capacity to grow at sub-optimal temperatures (10°C), while lines transformed with SOD3.1 or ROB5 had greater tolerance of freezing temperatures than the parental line. These results are encouraging as even a small degree of enhancement of stress tolerance has the potential to produce significant economic benefits in high value/stress sensitive crops such as potato. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.


Whittle C.A.,National Research Council Canada | Malik M.R.,National Research Council Canada | Malik M.R.,Agrisoma Biosciences Inc. | Li R.,National Research Council Canada | Krochko J.E.,National Research Council Canada
Plant Molecular Biology | Year: 2010

Transcriptome data for plant reproductive organs/cells currently is very limited as compared to sporophytic tissues. Here, we constructed cDNA libraries and obtained ESTs for Brassica napus pollen (4,864 ESTs), microspores (i.e., early stage pollen development; 6,539 ESTs) and ovules (10,468 ESTs). Clustering and assembly of the 21,871 ESTs yielded a total of 10,782 unigenes, with 3,362 contigs and 7,420 singletons. The pollen transcriptome contained high levels of polygalacturonases and pectinesterases, which are involved in cell wall synthesis and expansion, and very few transcription factors or transcripts related to protein synthesis. The set of genes expressed in mature pollen showed little overlap with genes expressed in ovules or in microspores, suggesting in the latter case that a marked differentiation had occurred from the early microspore stages through to pollen development. Remarkably, the microspores and ovules exhibited a high number of co-expressed genes (N = 1,283) and very similar EST functional profiles, including high transcript numbers for transcriptional and translational processing genes, protein modification genes and unannotated genes. In addition, examination of expression values for genes co-expressed among microspores and ovules revealed a highly statistically significant correlation among these two tissues (R = 0.360, P = 1.2 × 10 -40) as well as a lack of differentially expressed genes. Overall, the results provide new insights into the transcriptional profile of rarely studied ovules, the transcript changes during pollen development, transcriptional regulation of pollen tube growth and germination, and describe the parallels in the transcript populations of microspore and ovules which could have implications for understanding the molecular foundation of microspore totipotency in B. napus. © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2009.


The narrow genetic base in spring Brassica napus (AACC) canola is a limitation for continued improvement of this crop. This research focused on broadening of genetic diversity in spring canola by using B. oleracea (CC). Seeds of B. oleracea contain high levels of erucic acid and glucosinolates, which are undesired in canola. Therefore, inheritance of these traits and the prospect of developing spring canola with allelic diversity introgressed from B. oleracea were investigated in B. napus Х B. oleracea interspecific progenies. Zero-erucic plants in F2 generation occurred at a lower frequency than expected based on segregation involving only the C-genome erucic acid alleles. Selection in F2 to F3 focused on zero erucic acid, while focus in later generation was for low glucosinolate and B. napus plants. In the F6, 31% zero erucic families had low glucosinolate content. Flow cytometry analysis of the F8 families showed no significant difference from the B. napus parent. Genetic diversity analysis by using simple sequence repeat markers from the C-genome chromosomes showed that the F8 families received up to 54% alleles from B. oleracea. The results demonstrate the feasibility of enriching genetic diversity in B. napus canola by using B. oleracea. © 2015, Agricultural Institute of Canada. All Rights Reserved.


Rahman H.,University of Alberta | Bennett R.A.,University of Alberta | Bennett R.A.,Agrisoma Biosciences Inc. | Yang R.-C.,Crop Research and Extension Division | Yang R.-C.,University of Alberta
Crop Science | Year: 2016

Allelic diversity of the allied species of Brassica napus L. as well as of the winter form of this species has been demonstrated to be related with increasing productivity of hybrid spring B. napus cultivars. To compare potential value of the different gene pools of Brassica species three spring B. napus inbred populations were developed by use of a B. oleracea L. line, a spring B. napus breeding line, and a winter B. napus cultivar crossed to a spring B. napus ‘HiQ’; and test hybrids of these inbred lines were produced by crossing with Hi-Q as the common tester. Mid-parent heterosis (MPH) showed a negative correlation with seed yield of the inbred lines in all three populations; however, a positive correlation existed between seed yield of the inbred lines and heterosis over Hi-Q (HiQH) (or, inbred vs. hybrid yield). On average, the level of MPH in hybrid of the inbred lines derived from B. napus × B. oleracea cross was twice greater than the level of heterosis found for the inbred lines derived from spring × spring or winter × spring B. napus crosses. The inbred population derived from winter × spring cross gave highest seed yield, and this population also gave highest HiQH. The results suggested that B. oleracea and winter canola could be used in spring B. napus canola breeding for accumulating additive and non-additive effect genes for increased seed yield in hybrid cultivars. © Crop Science Society of America.


The present invention relates to transgenic plants comprising a plurality of nucleic acids heterologous to said plant, each of said nucleic acid comprising a coding sequence operably linked to one or more regulatory elements for directing expression of said coding sequence in said plant, said nucleic acid being stably integrated at or adjacent to rDNA sequences, or a seed, organ, tissue, part or cell thereof, or a descendant of said plant, seed, organ, tissue, part or cell; methods of producing the transgenic plants; and methods of producing oil using the transgenic plants.


Trademark
Agrisoma Biosciences Inc. | Date: 2011-12-20

(Based on Intent to Use) Agricultural seeds(Based on 44(d) Priority Application) Agricultural seeds.


Trademark
Agrisoma Biosciences Inc. | Date: 2011-12-20

Agricultural seeds for making industrial oil and high protein meal fractions for biofuel production and animal feed.


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