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News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

No agriculture investing portfolio should be without seafood and aquaculture — join the world's leading investors to find out why ​Seafood is the world’s most traded protein commodity, valued at over $180 billion, and driven by massive, modern and innovative companies around the globe. The United Nations estimates that as the world’s population increases, demand for seafood will dramatically outpace supply. The world’s seafood, aquaculture and fisheries giants in control of these resources are positioned to grow to meet that expanding demand. No ag portfolio should be without seafood – but most are. That’s why on May 23, at the W Hotel in the heart of New York City, IntraFish Media, the world’s largest provider of news and information on the global seafood industry, in partnership with Pareto Securities, is bringing the world’s top investors and seafood industry executives together for a full-day seminar of presentations from the world’s largest seafood, aquaculture and fisheries companies, offering unrivaled insight into the opportunities in the sector. From private equity to venture capital to institutional investors, the secret is getting out: Permira, Lion Capital, Rabobank, EQT Partners, Paine Schwartz, Bain Capital, Carlyle and Oaktree all have quietly entered the seafood sector, and have reaped the rewards of growth. Agrifood, FMCG and pharmaceutical groups from Cargill to ADM to Zoetis have in recent years invested heavily in the aquaculture and fish feed sectors, and the still-fragmented and emerging industry has a lot more consolidating to do. Seafood is an investment opportunity that you can’t afford to miss, and no other venue or event can offer you insight into the sector like the Seafood Investor Forum. Click here to sign up today and reserve your spot! Past forums have featured executives from: Marine Harvest, Cermaq, Thai Union, Ewos, Disney, Sysco, Multiexport, Gorton's, Iglo Group, Red Lobster, Icicle Seafoods, Trident Seafoods, Bakkafrost, Cooke Aquaculture, AquaChile, Austevoll Seafoods, Leroy Seafood Group, Oceana Group, Kampachi Farms, Ocean Choice International, Blumar, High Liner Foods, Clearwater Seafoods, The Clinton Global Initiative, Regal Springs, Nireus and many more. Event attendees have included executives from Eagle Asset Management, Bonafide Wealth Management, Bregal Partners, Carlyle, Centre Partners, Brookside Capital, Calypso Capital, Cartesian Capital, Axon Capital, AGR Partners, BNP Paribas, China Select Capital, The Prince's International Sustainability Unit (ISU), Bloomberg Philanthropies, Black River Asset Management, Conti Street Partners, Counterpoint Capital, Baring Asset Management and many more. IntraFish Media is the world's largest provider of news and information to the global seafood, aquaculture and commercial fisheries sector, serving readers around the globe with exclusive news from offices in London, New York, Seattle, Berlin and Bergen, Norway.


During their Florida tour, the French delegation will meet educators and visit schools to learn how chef-to-school programs and campus gardens play important roles in food service.  They will also have an opportunity to meet farmers and visit local farms where school food is sourced. "Our partnership in implementing Fresh Attitude Week is an extraordinary opportunity for sharing our experiences to elevate fruits and vegetables in school meals," said Bruno Dupont, president of Interfel.  "It is always very interesting and rewarding to observe how our counterparts do it abroad. Discovering and sharing the importance of fruits and vegetables are the essence of Fresh Attitude Week's identity. This project stems from the primary wish to raise awareness about a balanced diet for better public health no matter the country: Fresh Attitude Week, by definition, has no border." Fresh Attitude Week celebrations have helped raise the popularity of produce in school meals.  The Alliance districts increased fresh fruits and vegetable consumption in schools during Fresh Attitude Week by nearly 46 percent, from 5.9 million servings in 2015 to 8.6 million servings in 2016. Studies show that the more young people try various fruits and vegetables, the more likely they are to continue consuming them later in life.  For Fresh Attitude Week, the seven school districts in the Alliance will conduct the following activities: Of their total annual budget of $592 million in food and food supplies, the Urban School Food Alliance districts purchase more than $76 million worth of fruits and vegetables a year.  More than 50 percent of the produce are locally sourced. In 2014, the French Ministry of Agriculture, Agrifood and Forestry invited members of the Urban School Food Alliance to visit France to observe how the French government and the fruit and vegetable sector promote food awareness and healthy eating in schools.  In particular, classes encourage French students to sample a variety of food items using their five senses and to share their experience with their peers, ultimately strengthening the food culture of France for future generations. The Urban School Food Alliance was created by school food professionals in 2012 to address the unique needs of the nation's largest school districts. The nonprofit group allows the districts to share best practices and leverage their purchasing power to continue to drive quality up and costs down while incorporating sound environmental practices.  New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas as well as Miami-Dade, Orange County and Broward County in Florida, together offer service in over 4,765 schools to 3.1 million children daily. This translates to more than half a billion meals a year.  The coalition aims to ensure that all public school students across the nation receive healthy, nutritious meals through socially responsible practices.  To learn more about the Urban School Food Alliance or to support its work, please visit www.urbanschoolfoodalliance.org. Interfel (French Inter-Branch Association of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables) is the lead promotional organization for fresh fruits and vegetables in France, representing all aspects of the sector from production to distribution, including school canteens and education in schools. www.lesfruitsetlegumesfrais.com / www.interfel.com To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/urban-school-food-alliance-celebrates-fresh-attitude-week-with-french-delegation-from-may-8-12-2017-300452386.html


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

With an estimated 12 million loaves sold in the UK every year, bread remains a staple of the British diet. In a groundbreaking study researchers from the University of Sheffield have now calculated the environmental impact of a loaf of bread and which part of its production contributes the most greenhouse gas. The group of interdisciplinary researchers from the University's Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures, analysed the complete process from growing and harvesting the wheat; milling the grain; producing the flour; baking the bread and the production of the final product, ready to be sold by retailers. The findings, published today (27 February 2017) in the journal Nature Plants, show ammonium nitrate fertiliser used in wheat cultivation contributes almost half (43 per cent) of the greenhouse gas emissions - dwarfing all other processes in the supply chain. Dr Liam Goucher, N8 Agrifood Research Fellow from the University of Sheffield who carried out the study, said: "Consumers are usually unaware of the environmental impacts embodied in the products they purchase - particularly in the case of food, where the main concerns are usually over health or animal welfare. "There is perhaps awareness of pollution caused by plastic packaging, but many people will be surprised at the wider environmental impacts revealed in this study. "We found in every loaf there is embodied global warming resulting from the fertiliser applied to farmers' fields to increase their wheat harvest. This arises from the large amount of energy needed to make the fertilizer and from nitrous oxide gas released when it is degraded in the soil." How to produce sufficient healthy and affordable food for the world's growing and more demanding population, whilst protecting the environment is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. It is estimated that up to 60 per cent of agricultural crops are now grown with the use of fertilisers. Although they can dramatically boast the growth of plants and vegetables - assisting the growing demand of food yields - fertilisers consist of substances and chemicals such as methane, carbon dioxide, ammonia and nitrogen. The emissions from these substances in synthetic fertilisers contribute to greenhouse gases. Professor Peter Horton FRS, Chief Research Advisor to the Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures at the University of Sheffield and corresponding author of the paper, said: "Our findings bring into focus a key part of the food security challenge - resolving the major conflicts embedded in the agri-food system, whose primary purpose is to make money not to provide sustainable global food security. "High agricultural productivity - necessary for profit for farmers, agri-businesses and food retailers, whilst also keeping prices low for consumers - currently requires high levels of application of relatively cheap fertilisers." He added: "With over 100 million tonnes of fertiliser used globally each year to support agricultural production this is a massive problem, but environmental impact is not costed within the system and so there are currently no real incentives to reduce our reliance on fertiliser. "How to achieve sustainable global food security is not only a technical question but a political economic one, and requires interdisciplinary research of the kind we do here at Sheffield." The study was made possible by a pioneering collaboration with the agricultural and food manufacturing sector developed by Richard Bruce, a co-author of the paper and Business Engagement Lead for the Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures at the University of Sheffield. The data analysed in the study was processed using an advanced life-cycle assessment tool - SCEnAT - developed by Professor Lenny Koh, Director of the Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre at the University's Management School and co-author of the paper. "This tool handles large and complex data sets and yielding data on the environmental impact, including greenhouse gas emissions of all the stages in the supply chain," said Professor Koh. "The tool identifies the processes that yield the most impact - the hotspots. "The findings raise a very important issue - whose responsibility is it to bring about the implementation of these interventions: the fertiliser manufacturer, the farmer, the retailer or the consumer? "There is a growing recognition for a range of industrial processes of the notion of extended producer responsibility - the producer being responsible for downstream impact, expanded to the idea of shared producer and consumer responsibility. The consumer is key, whether being persuaded to pay more for a greener product or by applying pressure for a change in practice." The paper also highlights the solutions available which could potentially reduce these impacts in the future. Co-author Professor Duncan Cameron, Co-director of the P3 Centre for Translational Plant and Soil Science explains: "The fertiliser problem is solvable - through improved agronomic practices". "These harness the best of organic farming combined with new technologies to better monitor the nutritional status of soils and plants and to recycle waste and with the promise of new wheat varieties able to utilise soil nitrogen more efficiently". The Grantham Centre at the University of Sheffield is an ambitious and innovative collaboration between the University of Sheffield and the Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment. For more information please visit http://grantham. P3 is a centre of excellence for translational plant and soil science using the breadth of plant and soil science expertise within the University of Sheffield to find suitable solutions to agricultural problems. To find out more please visit http://p3. The Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC) at the University of Sheffield is a facility to promote the collaboration between industry and academia. It provides a platform for access to policy makers, in order to meet the challenge of promoting resource efficiency and sustainability across supply chains. The concept of AREC as a facility is to enable the creation of competitive advantage through developing resource sustainable supply chains, built on a strong foundation of government policy initiatives. AREC supports the development of resource sustainable supply chains by proposing new ways of reducing risk for partners in overcoming the challenges of resource availability. Through AREC, Small & Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs) can join in collaboration with larger industrial partners and benefit from cutting edge academic research and skills. For more information please visit: http://www. With almost 27,000 of the brightest students from over 140 countries, learning alongside over 1,200 of the best academics from across the globe, the University of Sheffield is one of the world's leading universities. A member of the UK's prestigious Russell Group of leading research-led institutions, Sheffield offers world-class teaching and research excellence across a wide range of disciplines. Unified by the power of discovery and understanding, staff and students at the university are committed to finding new ways to transform the world we live in. Sheffield is the only university to feature in The Sunday Times 100 Best Not-For-Profit Organisations to Work For 2017 and was voted number one university in the UK for Student Satisfaction by Times Higher Education in 2014. In the last decade it has won four Queen's Anniversary Prizes in recognition of the outstanding contribution to the United Kingdom's intellectual, economic, cultural and social life. Sheffield has six Nobel Prize winners among former staff and students and its alumni go on to hold positions of great responsibility and influence all over the world, making significant contributions in their chosen fields. Global research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls-Royce, Unilever, AstraZeneca, Glaxo SmithKline, Siemens and Airbus, as well as many UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations. For further information, please visit: http://www.


Nicoletti I.,National Research Council Italy | Bellincontro A.,Agrifood | De Rossi A.,National Research Council Italy | De Sanctis F.,Agrifood | And 5 more authors.
Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research | Year: 2013

Background and Aims: Sfursat is an Italian wine produced with partially dehydrated Nebbiolo grapes in the Valtellina region which is located at high altitude. The research aims to understand the influence of fruit exposure on the rate of water loss by harvested fruit and the influence of exposure and dehydration on the content of phenolic substances and anthocyanins in the wine. Methods and Results: Clusters of Nebbiolo grapes from control vines (ND) and from vines that were defoliated at fruitset (DFS) or post-veraison (DPV) were harvested at a sugar concentration of about 230g/L (there was no significant difference among the treatments), and dehydrated at 10, 20 or 30°C and at 60% relative humidity (RH), and air flow. Fruit were sampled at 10 and 20% weight loss (WL). Leaf removal had little effect on the physical characteristics of bunches and on the anthocyanins content and profile of harvested Nebbiolo grapes but affected dehydration. At 10 and 20°C, DFS fruit lost mass more slowly than DPV and ND fruit. In ND fruit, 20% WL reduced anthocyanins from 554mg/kg fresh mass (FM) at harvest to 458, 432 and 396mg/kg FM at 10, 20 and 30°C, respectively. In DFS and DPV berries, anthocyanins increased during dehydration at 10°C. At harvest, ND berries had a lower content of total stilbenes than those from defoliated vines. Dehydration (10°C, 20% WL) increased stilbene concentration in ND and DPV fruit. Dehydration at 10°C induced a rise in the flavonol concentration in fruit from defoliated vines. Catechin concentration was 106.5mg/kg DM (dry mass), the highest value in ND berries at harvest. Wine was produced only from grapes dehydrated at 10°C. Wine from DFS fruit had a higher content of phenolic substances (2704.8mg/L) and anthocyanins (104mg/L) than that from DPV (2454.9 and 96.2mg/L, respectively) and ND (2301.9 and 100.5mg/L, respectively) fruit. Conclusions: Postharvest dehydration was slower where vines had been defoliated and resulted in changes in the ratios among groups of phenolic substances as well as among single phenolic components. Significance of the Study: In Nebbiolo grapes for Sfurzat wine production, defoliation at fruit set enables fruit to reach phenolic maturity at a lower sugar concentration allowing dehydration to increase sugar concentration without producing excessively alcoholic wines. © 2013 Australian Society of Viticulture and Oenology Inc.

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