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Viterbo, Italy
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During their Florida tour, the French delegation will meet educators and visit schools to learn how chef-to-school programs and campus gardens play important roles in food service.  They will also have an opportunity to meet farmers and visit local farms where school food is sourced. "Our partnership in implementing Fresh Attitude Week is an extraordinary opportunity for sharing our experiences to elevate fruits and vegetables in school meals," said Bruno Dupont, president of Interfel.  "It is always very interesting and rewarding to observe how our counterparts do it abroad. Discovering and sharing the importance of fruits and vegetables are the essence of Fresh Attitude Week's identity. This project stems from the primary wish to raise awareness about a balanced diet for better public health no matter the country: Fresh Attitude Week, by definition, has no border." Fresh Attitude Week celebrations have helped raise the popularity of produce in school meals.  The Alliance districts increased fresh fruits and vegetable consumption in schools during Fresh Attitude Week by nearly 46 percent, from 5.9 million servings in 2015 to 8.6 million servings in 2016. Studies show that the more young people try various fruits and vegetables, the more likely they are to continue consuming them later in life.  For Fresh Attitude Week, the seven school districts in the Alliance will conduct the following activities: Of their total annual budget of $592 million in food and food supplies, the Urban School Food Alliance districts purchase more than $76 million worth of fruits and vegetables a year.  More than 50 percent of the produce are locally sourced. In 2014, the French Ministry of Agriculture, Agrifood and Forestry invited members of the Urban School Food Alliance to visit France to observe how the French government and the fruit and vegetable sector promote food awareness and healthy eating in schools.  In particular, classes encourage French students to sample a variety of food items using their five senses and to share their experience with their peers, ultimately strengthening the food culture of France for future generations. The Urban School Food Alliance was created by school food professionals in 2012 to address the unique needs of the nation's largest school districts. The nonprofit group allows the districts to share best practices and leverage their purchasing power to continue to drive quality up and costs down while incorporating sound environmental practices.  New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas as well as Miami-Dade, Orange County and Broward County in Florida, together offer service in over 4,765 schools to 3.1 million children daily. This translates to more than half a billion meals a year.  The coalition aims to ensure that all public school students across the nation receive healthy, nutritious meals through socially responsible practices.  To learn more about the Urban School Food Alliance or to support its work, please visit www.urbanschoolfoodalliance.org. Interfel (French Inter-Branch Association of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables) is the lead promotional organization for fresh fruits and vegetables in France, representing all aspects of the sector from production to distribution, including school canteens and education in schools. www.lesfruitsetlegumesfrais.com / www.interfel.com To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/urban-school-food-alliance-celebrates-fresh-attitude-week-with-french-delegation-from-may-8-12-2017-300452386.html


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

No agriculture investing portfolio should be without seafood and aquaculture — join the world's leading investors to find out why ​Seafood is the world’s most traded protein commodity, valued at over $180 billion, and driven by massive, modern and innovative companies around the globe. The United Nations estimates that as the world’s population increases, demand for seafood will dramatically outpace supply. The world’s seafood, aquaculture and fisheries giants in control of these resources are positioned to grow to meet that expanding demand. No ag portfolio should be without seafood – but most are. That’s why on May 23, at the W Hotel in the heart of New York City, IntraFish Media, the world’s largest provider of news and information on the global seafood industry, in partnership with Pareto Securities, is bringing the world’s top investors and seafood industry executives together for a full-day seminar of presentations from the world’s largest seafood, aquaculture and fisheries companies, offering unrivaled insight into the opportunities in the sector. From private equity to venture capital to institutional investors, the secret is getting out: Permira, Lion Capital, Rabobank, EQT Partners, Paine Schwartz, Bain Capital, Carlyle and Oaktree all have quietly entered the seafood sector, and have reaped the rewards of growth. Agrifood, FMCG and pharmaceutical groups from Cargill to ADM to Zoetis have in recent years invested heavily in the aquaculture and fish feed sectors, and the still-fragmented and emerging industry has a lot more consolidating to do. Seafood is an investment opportunity that you can’t afford to miss, and no other venue or event can offer you insight into the sector like the Seafood Investor Forum. Click here to sign up today and reserve your spot! Past forums have featured executives from: Marine Harvest, Cermaq, Thai Union, Ewos, Disney, Sysco, Multiexport, Gorton's, Iglo Group, Red Lobster, Icicle Seafoods, Trident Seafoods, Bakkafrost, Cooke Aquaculture, AquaChile, Austevoll Seafoods, Leroy Seafood Group, Oceana Group, Kampachi Farms, Ocean Choice International, Blumar, High Liner Foods, Clearwater Seafoods, The Clinton Global Initiative, Regal Springs, Nireus and many more. Event attendees have included executives from Eagle Asset Management, Bonafide Wealth Management, Bregal Partners, Carlyle, Centre Partners, Brookside Capital, Calypso Capital, Cartesian Capital, Axon Capital, AGR Partners, BNP Paribas, China Select Capital, The Prince's International Sustainability Unit (ISU), Bloomberg Philanthropies, Black River Asset Management, Conti Street Partners, Counterpoint Capital, Baring Asset Management and many more. IntraFish Media is the world's largest provider of news and information to the global seafood, aquaculture and commercial fisheries sector, serving readers around the globe with exclusive news from offices in London, New York, Seattle, Berlin and Bergen, Norway.


WorldFish said Tuesday it will lead the new Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems (FISH), which will focus on sustainable aquaculture, small-scale fisheries, and enhancing contribution of fish to nutrition and health of the poor in priority geographies of Africa and Asia-Pacific. "Fish is the only animal-source food that can be produced in saltwater, offering unique advantages for climate resilient production," said FISH Interim Program Director and Management Committee Chair Michael Phillips. "Fish is the animal-source food with the fastest-growing production." The global FISH partnership will support fisheries and aquaculture contributions to achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and of CGIAR’s overall goals. Partnering on FISH with WorldFish are the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, Australia; the International Water Management Institute; Natural Resources Institute at the University of Greenwich (NRI), England and Wageningen University, Netherlands. For more seafood news and updates, follow us on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our daily newsletter.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.worldfishcenter.org

WorldFish will lead the new CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems (FISH) aiming to assist 3.5 million people to exit poverty and reducing the number of people suffering from deficiencies in essential micronutrients by 2.4 million. The global FISH partnership will enhance the contributions of fisheries and aquaculture to reducing poverty and improving food security and nutrition. It is designed to contribute to the achievement of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and of CGIAR’s overall goals. Citing the crucial role of fisheries and aquaculture in global strategies to reduce poverty and improve food security and nutrition, and noting the underinvestment in research and development (R&D) on fish, the United Nations (UN) Committee on World Food Security's expert panel specifically calls on CGIAR to lead research that will enhance sustainability, productivity and access to fish by those most in need (HLPE 2014). WorldFish Director General, Blake Ratner: “Enhancing the role of fish in global diets is a huge opportunity to affect sustainable change in livelihoods, food and nutrition security. Fish is a highly nutritious food source with great potential for scaled-up and environmentally sensitive production.” FISH aims to achieve six outcomes by 2022. FISH Interim Program Director and Management Committee Chair, Michael Phillips: “Fish is the animal-source food with the fastest-growing production. Sustainable aquaculture practices offer water, energy and feed conversion efficiencies superior to any other domesticated animal food. And, fish is the only animal-source food that can be produced in saltwater, offering unique advantages for climate resilient production.” FISH will focus on the three interlinked challenges of sustainable aquaculture, small-scale fisheries (SSF), and enhancing the contribution of fish to nutrition and health of the poor in priority geographies of Africa and Asia-Pacific. Fisheries and aquaculture contribute to livelihoods for 800 million people and provide 3.1 billion people with 20% of their animal protein (FAO 2015), as well as micronutrients and essential fatty acids critical to cognitive and physical development (HLPE 2014). Three-quarters of the countries where fish contributes more than one-third of animal protein in the diet are low-income food-deficit countries (Kawarazuka and Béné 2011), where fish is often the cheapest and most accessible animal-source food (Belton and Thilsted 2014). To meet future demand for fish, particularly in developing countries, production will need to double by 2030. The scale of this challenge requires research innovations across the whole spectrum of aquaculture and fisheries production systems and associated value chains. FISH brings together a unique set of multistakeholder partnerships to harness emerging science in aquaculture and fisheries to deliver development outcomes at scale. FISH is led by WorldFish, together with the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, Australia; the International Water Management Institute; Natural Resources Institute at the University of Greenwich (NRI), England and Wageningen University, Netherlands. For more information or to request an interview contact: About WorldFish is an international, nonprofit research organization that harnesses the potential of fisheries and aquaculture to reduce hunger and poverty. Globally, more than one billion poor people obtain most of their animal protein from fish and 800 million depend on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods. WorldFish is a member of CGIAR, a global research partnership for a food-secure future. About FISH Pursuing a research agenda through a network of multistakeholder partners, The CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems (FISH) enhances the contributions of fisheries and aquaculture to reducing poverty and improving food security and nutrition. FISH brings together a unique set of multi-stakeholder partnerships to harness emerging science in aquaculture and fisheries to deliver development outcomes at scale. FISH is led by WorldFish, together with the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, Australia; the International Water Management Institute; Natural Resources Institute at the University of Greenwich (NRI), England and Wageningen University, Netherlands. In regional contexts, the program partners closely with governments, NGOs, the private sector and research organizations to influence national, regional and global policy and development practice. About CGIAR is a global research partnership for a food-secure future. Its science is carried out by the 15 research Centers that are members of the CGIAR Consortium in collaboration with hundreds of partners.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The DMCC Executive Chairman, Ahmed Bin Sulayem, has conducted a series of meetings with senior government officials of Western Australia (WA) in Perth. Discussions focused on ways to enhance the bilateral relationship and further bolster the trade between the DMCC, the world’s leading and most interconnected Free Zone, and Western Australia. The DMCC Executive Chairman met with Honorable Alannah MacTiernan, Minister for Regional Development, Agriculture & Food; the Deputy Director General of Department of State Development; Martin Mileham, Chief Executive Officer of the City of Perth; Deidre Willmott and Chief Executive Officer of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry WA, amongst other officials. The DMCC Executive Chairman and the Minister for Regional Development, Agriculture & Food discussed the important role that the UAE plays in Australia’s foreign trade. As the 16th largest trading partner and largest in the Middle East, WA Agricultural Exports to the UAE was valued at $227 million in 2014-2015 , with 12% annual growth. With both Emirates and Etihad airways servicing Perth – UAE there are opportunities to grow higher valued chilled food trade further. Parties also discussed further opportunities for both Australia and the UAE. Honorable Minister Alannah MacTiernan said: “The UAE is an important trade partner for Australia with two-way goods and services trade worth $8.8 billion. In 2015, the UAE investment in Australia was estimated at $12.5 billion. Further expansions can be achieved by increased research and beyond capital investment we are looking into further opportunities to create a more prolific investment environment. Our government is aware that DMCC has a dedicated Agro Hub with a grains focus offering finance, trade facilitation and a “Food Trade Group” to encourage industry growth. WA Government is represented in Dubai by Western Australia Trade Office and we look forward to enhance our engagement with the UAE and DMCC”. Mr. Bin Sulayem said: “With Dubai’s strategic location providing access to world markets and cutting edge Free Zone infrastructure, we can provide significant value addition and reach for Australian trade. We are determined to work closely with Australia to drive more trade flows through Dubai and help Australian businesses to grow.” Mr. Bin Sulayem visited the Council House to hold discussions with Martin Mileham, Chief Executive Officer of the City of Perth. The discussion focused on Dubai’s and Perth’s shared focus on infrastructure development and smart technologies which has high effect on the business environment and Human Development Index (HDI), where both cities were top rated as “very high human developed”. “The Smart Dubai Initiative is anchored in the vision of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, to make Dubai the happiest city on the Earth, aiming at introducing strategic initiatives and developing partnerships to contribute to its Smart Economy, Smart Living, Smart Governance, Smart People and Smart Mobility. With over 13,5000 companies in our Free Zone and nearly 100,000 living and working in our community, we are constantly looking for ways to improve, including smart city initiatives. I was inspired by the discussions and insights from the CEO of the City of Perth, who works to continue to improve the infrastructure of Perth, a beautiful and progressive city in Western Australia”, concluded Mr. Bin Sulayem. “Major projects in Perth have not only made it a more attractive city for its residents but transformed the capital into a world class travel destination. Demand for hotel rooms in Perth continues to grow and investment in hospitality is providing new jobs and business opportunities. The solid transport connection between Dubai and Perth helps enhance our strong ties and further facilitate the development of our economies”, concluded, Mr. Mileham. The DMCC Executive Chairman was also briefed by the Deputy Director General of Department of State Development on the history of rapid growth of Western Australia averaging 5.3% per annum, contributing a significant share of world production of key commodities, such as iron ore (37%), alumina (12%), diamonds (10%), LNG (8%), nickel (7%), gold (6%) . Western Australia is also famous for its premium agriculture and food products free from major pests and diseases that guarantees safe, quality food to suppliers and consumers, which makes it a great trade partner for the United Arab Emirates. With an increasing global demand for safe and reliable premium foods, the agriculture and food sector has the potential to make a much greater contribution to the WA economy. Recognising this, in 2013 the Department of Agriculture and Food established the Agrifood 2025+ Strategy to support the industry in its efforts to double the value of its sales by 2025. With DMCC’s Agri Hub, Tea Centre and future Coffee Centre, there are a lot of opportunities for collaboration with the UAE. The visit of the DMCC Executive Chairman was organised by the Government of Australia (Western Australian Trade Office – Middle East & Africa) to exchange experience and facilitate the bilateral trade between two counties. DMCC is the authority on trade, enterprise and commodities in Dubai - home to the world’s leading businesses of today, and tomorrow. The most successful markets create conditions that enable producers, traders and consumers to thrive. DMCC is a Dubai Government Authority committed to developing these ideal conditions and has a strong track record in commodity trade facilitation where we encourage and support business through the platforms we provide. These include our Free Zone, commodity exchanges, legal and regulatory frameworks and our real estate offering. DMCC is developing the ‘Burj2020 District’ as part of our DMCC Free Zone expansion strategy to provide leading businesses with a commercial property offering unique to the Dubai marketplace. Indispensable to the economic growth of the nation, we - together with our members - deliver strong performance today, and sustainable growth tomorrow.


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: www.thefishsite.com

A new programme that aims to use fisheries and aquaculture to assist 3.5 million people to exit poverty and reduce the number of people suffering from deficiencies in essential micronutrients by 2.4 million has been launched this month. Called the CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agrifood Systems (FISH), it will be led by WorldFish and aims to enhance the contributions of fisheries and aquaculture to reducing poverty and improving food security and nutrition. It is designed to contribute to the achievement of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and of CGIAR’s overall goals. Citing the crucial role of fisheries and aquaculture in global strategies to reduce poverty and improve food security and nutrition, and noting the underinvestment in research and development (R&D) on fish, the United Nations (UN) Committee on World Food Security's expert panel specifically calls on CGIAR to lead research that will enhance sustainability, productivity and access to fish by those most in need (HLPE 2014). WorldFish Director General, Blake Ratner, reflected: “Enhancing the role of fish in global diets is a huge opportunity to affect sustainable change in livelihoods, food and nutrition security. Fish is a highly nutritious food source with great potential for scaled-up and environmentally sensitive production.” FISH aims to achieve six outcomes by 2022: • Adoption of improved breeds, aquafeeds, fish health and aquaculture and fisheries management practices by 5.0 m households. • Assisting 3.5 m people, with at least 50% women, to exit poverty through gender-inclusive livelihood improvements. • Reducing the number of people suffering from deficiencies in essential micronutrients by 2.4m, with at least 50% of them women. • Assisting 4.7m more women of reproductive age to consume an adequate number of food groups. • Decreasing greenhouse gas emissions by 20%, and increasing water and nutrient use efficiency by 10%, in 4.8m metric tons of annual farmed fish production. • Restoring 3.3m ha of ecosystems through more productive and equitable management of small-scale fishery resources and rehabilitation of degraded aquaculture ponds. FISH Interim Program Director and Management Committee Chair, Michael Phillips, added: “Fish is the animal-source food with the fastest-growing production. Sustainable aquaculture practices offer water, energy and feed conversion efficiencies superior to any other domesticated animal food. And, fish is the only animal-source food that can be produced in saltwater, offering unique advantages for climate resilient production.” FISH will focus on the three interlinked challenges of sustainable aquaculture, small-scale fisheries (SSF), and enhancing the contribution of fish to nutrition and health of the poor in priority geographies of Africa and Asia-Pacific. Fisheries and aquaculture contribute to livelihoods for 800 million people and provide 3.1 billion people with 20% of their animal protein (FAO 2015), as well as micronutrients and essential fatty acids critical to cognitive and physical development (HLPE 2014). Three-quarters of the countries where fish contributes more than one-third of animal protein in the diet are low-income food-deficit countries (Kawarazuka and Béné 2011), where fish is often the cheapest and most accessible animal-source food (Belton and Thilsted 2014). To meet future demand for fish, particularly in developing countries, production will need to double by 2030. The scale of this challenge requires research innovations across the whole spectrum of aquaculture and fisheries production systems and associated value chains. FISH brings together a unique set of multi-stakeholder partnerships to harness emerging science in aquaculture and fisheries to deliver development outcomes at scale. FISH is led by WorldFish, together with the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, Australia; the International Water Management Institute; Natural Resources Institute at the University of Greenwich (NRI), England and Wageningen University, Netherlands.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

With an estimated 12 million loaves sold in the UK every year, bread remains a staple of the British diet. In a groundbreaking study researchers from the University of Sheffield have now calculated the environmental impact of a loaf of bread and which part of its production contributes the most greenhouse gas. The group of interdisciplinary researchers from the University's Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures, analysed the complete process from growing and harvesting the wheat; milling the grain; producing the flour; baking the bread and the production of the final product, ready to be sold by retailers. The findings, published today (27 February 2017) in the journal Nature Plants, show ammonium nitrate fertiliser used in wheat cultivation contributes almost half (43 per cent) of the greenhouse gas emissions - dwarfing all other processes in the supply chain. Dr Liam Goucher, N8 Agrifood Research Fellow from the University of Sheffield who carried out the study, said: "Consumers are usually unaware of the environmental impacts embodied in the products they purchase - particularly in the case of food, where the main concerns are usually over health or animal welfare. "There is perhaps awareness of pollution caused by plastic packaging, but many people will be surprised at the wider environmental impacts revealed in this study. "We found in every loaf there is embodied global warming resulting from the fertiliser applied to farmers' fields to increase their wheat harvest. This arises from the large amount of energy needed to make the fertilizer and from nitrous oxide gas released when it is degraded in the soil." How to produce sufficient healthy and affordable food for the world's growing and more demanding population, whilst protecting the environment is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. It is estimated that up to 60 per cent of agricultural crops are now grown with the use of fertilisers. Although they can dramatically boast the growth of plants and vegetables - assisting the growing demand of food yields - fertilisers consist of substances and chemicals such as methane, carbon dioxide, ammonia and nitrogen. The emissions from these substances in synthetic fertilisers contribute to greenhouse gases. Professor Peter Horton FRS, Chief Research Advisor to the Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures at the University of Sheffield and corresponding author of the paper, said: "Our findings bring into focus a key part of the food security challenge - resolving the major conflicts embedded in the agri-food system, whose primary purpose is to make money not to provide sustainable global food security. "High agricultural productivity - necessary for profit for farmers, agri-businesses and food retailers, whilst also keeping prices low for consumers - currently requires high levels of application of relatively cheap fertilisers." He added: "With over 100 million tonnes of fertiliser used globally each year to support agricultural production this is a massive problem, but environmental impact is not costed within the system and so there are currently no real incentives to reduce our reliance on fertiliser. "How to achieve sustainable global food security is not only a technical question but a political economic one, and requires interdisciplinary research of the kind we do here at Sheffield." The study was made possible by a pioneering collaboration with the agricultural and food manufacturing sector developed by Richard Bruce, a co-author of the paper and Business Engagement Lead for the Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures at the University of Sheffield. The data analysed in the study was processed using an advanced life-cycle assessment tool - SCEnAT - developed by Professor Lenny Koh, Director of the Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre at the University's Management School and co-author of the paper. "This tool handles large and complex data sets and yielding data on the environmental impact, including greenhouse gas emissions of all the stages in the supply chain," said Professor Koh. "The tool identifies the processes that yield the most impact - the hotspots. "The findings raise a very important issue - whose responsibility is it to bring about the implementation of these interventions: the fertiliser manufacturer, the farmer, the retailer or the consumer? "There is a growing recognition for a range of industrial processes of the notion of extended producer responsibility - the producer being responsible for downstream impact, expanded to the idea of shared producer and consumer responsibility. The consumer is key, whether being persuaded to pay more for a greener product or by applying pressure for a change in practice." The paper also highlights the solutions available which could potentially reduce these impacts in the future. Co-author Professor Duncan Cameron, Co-director of the P3 Centre for Translational Plant and Soil Science explains: "The fertiliser problem is solvable - through improved agronomic practices". "These harness the best of organic farming combined with new technologies to better monitor the nutritional status of soils and plants and to recycle waste and with the promise of new wheat varieties able to utilise soil nitrogen more efficiently". The Grantham Centre at the University of Sheffield is an ambitious and innovative collaboration between the University of Sheffield and the Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment. For more information please visit http://grantham. P3 is a centre of excellence for translational plant and soil science using the breadth of plant and soil science expertise within the University of Sheffield to find suitable solutions to agricultural problems. To find out more please visit http://p3. The Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC) at the University of Sheffield is a facility to promote the collaboration between industry and academia. It provides a platform for access to policy makers, in order to meet the challenge of promoting resource efficiency and sustainability across supply chains. The concept of AREC as a facility is to enable the creation of competitive advantage through developing resource sustainable supply chains, built on a strong foundation of government policy initiatives. AREC supports the development of resource sustainable supply chains by proposing new ways of reducing risk for partners in overcoming the challenges of resource availability. Through AREC, Small & Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs) can join in collaboration with larger industrial partners and benefit from cutting edge academic research and skills. For more information please visit: http://www. With almost 27,000 of the brightest students from over 140 countries, learning alongside over 1,200 of the best academics from across the globe, the University of Sheffield is one of the world's leading universities. A member of the UK's prestigious Russell Group of leading research-led institutions, Sheffield offers world-class teaching and research excellence across a wide range of disciplines. Unified by the power of discovery and understanding, staff and students at the university are committed to finding new ways to transform the world we live in. Sheffield is the only university to feature in The Sunday Times 100 Best Not-For-Profit Organisations to Work For 2017 and was voted number one university in the UK for Student Satisfaction by Times Higher Education in 2014. In the last decade it has won four Queen's Anniversary Prizes in recognition of the outstanding contribution to the United Kingdom's intellectual, economic, cultural and social life. Sheffield has six Nobel Prize winners among former staff and students and its alumni go on to hold positions of great responsibility and influence all over the world, making significant contributions in their chosen fields. Global research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls-Royce, Unilever, AstraZeneca, Glaxo SmithKline, Siemens and Airbus, as well as many UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations. For further information, please visit: http://www.


Nicoletti I.,National Research Council Italy | Bellincontro A.,Agrifood | De Rossi A.,National Research Council Italy | De Sanctis F.,Agrifood | And 5 more authors.
Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research | Year: 2013

Background and Aims: Sfursat is an Italian wine produced with partially dehydrated Nebbiolo grapes in the Valtellina region which is located at high altitude. The research aims to understand the influence of fruit exposure on the rate of water loss by harvested fruit and the influence of exposure and dehydration on the content of phenolic substances and anthocyanins in the wine. Methods and Results: Clusters of Nebbiolo grapes from control vines (ND) and from vines that were defoliated at fruitset (DFS) or post-veraison (DPV) were harvested at a sugar concentration of about 230g/L (there was no significant difference among the treatments), and dehydrated at 10, 20 or 30°C and at 60% relative humidity (RH), and air flow. Fruit were sampled at 10 and 20% weight loss (WL). Leaf removal had little effect on the physical characteristics of bunches and on the anthocyanins content and profile of harvested Nebbiolo grapes but affected dehydration. At 10 and 20°C, DFS fruit lost mass more slowly than DPV and ND fruit. In ND fruit, 20% WL reduced anthocyanins from 554mg/kg fresh mass (FM) at harvest to 458, 432 and 396mg/kg FM at 10, 20 and 30°C, respectively. In DFS and DPV berries, anthocyanins increased during dehydration at 10°C. At harvest, ND berries had a lower content of total stilbenes than those from defoliated vines. Dehydration (10°C, 20% WL) increased stilbene concentration in ND and DPV fruit. Dehydration at 10°C induced a rise in the flavonol concentration in fruit from defoliated vines. Catechin concentration was 106.5mg/kg DM (dry mass), the highest value in ND berries at harvest. Wine was produced only from grapes dehydrated at 10°C. Wine from DFS fruit had a higher content of phenolic substances (2704.8mg/L) and anthocyanins (104mg/L) than that from DPV (2454.9 and 96.2mg/L, respectively) and ND (2301.9 and 100.5mg/L, respectively) fruit. Conclusions: Postharvest dehydration was slower where vines had been defoliated and resulted in changes in the ratios among groups of phenolic substances as well as among single phenolic components. Significance of the Study: In Nebbiolo grapes for Sfurzat wine production, defoliation at fruit set enables fruit to reach phenolic maturity at a lower sugar concentration allowing dehydration to increase sugar concentration without producing excessively alcoholic wines. © 2013 Australian Society of Viticulture and Oenology Inc.

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