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News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: phys.org

The Prototype Lunar/Mars Greenhouse Project (PLMGP) is all about growing vegetables for astronauts during extended stays on the moon, on Mars, or anywhere they can't be resupplied from Earth. Beyond growing food, the Project aims to understand how food-growing systems can also be a part of life-support systems. We're working with a team of scientists, engineers and small businesses at the University of Arizona to develop a closed-loop system. The approach uses plants to scrub carbon dioxide, while providing food and oxygen," said Dr. Ray Wheeler, lead scientist in Kennedy Advanced Life Support Research. The prototype itself is an inflatable, deployable system that researchers call a bioregenerative life support system. As crops are grown, the system recycles, water, recycles waste, and revitalizes the air. The system is hydroponic, so no soil is needed. Water that is either brought along on missions or gathered in situ—on the moon or at Mars for example—is enriched with nutrient salts, and flows continuously through plant root systems. Air in the system is recycled too. Astronauts exhale carbon dioxide, which plants absorb. Through photosynthesis, the plants produce oxygen for the astronauts. "We're mimicking what the plants would have if they were on Earth and make use of these processes for life support," said Dr. Gene Giacomelli, director of the Controlled Environment Agriculture Center at the University of Arizona. "The entire system of the lunar greenhouse does represent, in a small way, the biological systems that are here on Earth." A key part of a system like this is knowing what astronauts will have to bring with them, and what resources they can find at their destination. This includes which type of plants and seeds will be needed, as well as how much water might be available once astronauts reach their destination. Methods of extracting water on Mars or the moon are also being researched and developed. Even if the necessary water can be found in situ on Mars and the moon, that hardly means those are easy places to grow food. Astronauts have to be protected from radiation, and so will crops. These greenhouse chambers would have to buried underground, which means specialized lighting systems are also required. "We've been successful in using electric LED (light emitting diode) lighting to grow plants," Dr. Wheeler said. "We also have tested hybrids using both natural and artificial lighting." Solar light could be captured with light concentrators that track the sun and then convey the light to the chamber using fiber optic bundles. These systems are not NASA's first experience at growing crops in space. Experiments aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have been an important part of the research into crop production in non-terrestrial environments. The Veggie Plant Growth System was NASA's first attempt, and astronauts successfully harvested lettuce from that system. Earth has well-established systems for sustaining life, and this project is all about taking some of that to distant destinations in space. "I think it's interesting to consider that we're taking our terrestrial companions with us," Wheeler said. "While there may be ways to engineer around it in terms of stowage and resupply, it wouldn't be as sustainable. The greenhouses provide a more autonomous approach to long-term exploration on the moon, Mars and beyond." Explore further: How plants are grown beyond Earth?


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Efforts to colonize new planets through deep space missions such as to the moon and Mars are making sound progress. However, beyond the advancing space technologies, there is a lurking concern on providing good food to astronauts and finding a sustainable way to it. Obviously, nourishment coming from packets of frozen or dried food carried to space will be inadequate. The same goes for transporting ready-made food for many months or years. From rudimentary efforts, NASA is trying to take food production methods in space to the next level. Early efforts at vegetable-growing have been tried at the International Space Station. In upcoming missions, NASA is trying to expand those proven projects. Accordingly, NASA scientists at Kennedy Space Center in Florida are mulling a new method to support astronauts working in deep space missions with an inflatable greenhouse. The advantage of the greenhouse prototype is that it is inflatable, deployable and supportive of crop production. It performs such functions as nutrition yielding, air revitalization, water recycling and waste recycling — collectively called a bioregenerative system. Ray Wheeler, principal scientist in Kennedy Advanced Life Support Research, noted that the greenhouse project is aimed at Mars and lunar missions and is seeking to grow vegetables and plants. "We're working with a team of scientists, engineers and small businesses at the University of Arizona to develop a closed-loop system," Wheeler explained. The principle of the greenhouse project involves using plants to ward off carbon dioxide and generating food and oxygen. In other words, the greenhouse project's "bioregenerative life support system" is trying to replicate the environment of Earth for growing plants beyond the planet. Here, the carbon dioxide comes from what is exhaled by astronauts, which the greenhouse promptly uses to release oxygen. Also, oxygenated water will be pumped through the root zone of plants. The water could be brought from Earth, or NASA will be sourcing it from indigenous sources. As for the light being used in the greenhouse for photosynthesis, Martian or moon settlers have to use LED lights or tap solar light by tapping fiber optic bundles. Both light sources have been found successful during tests in an 18x8-foot prototype. Going forward, the greenhouses of higher dimensions will be required in housing different plants and meeting new capacity. More computer simulations are underway to understand the control required in balancing the interior environment of these artificial greenhouses. At the University of Arizona, tests are also progressing in choosing plants, seeds and other materials for making the greenhouse work on the moon or Mars. "We're mimicking what the plants would have if they were on Earth and make use of these processes for life support," said Dr. Gene Giacomelli, director of the Agriculture Center at the University of Arizona. To conclude, the core of pushing the greenhouse concept is a way toward the motto of minimum cargo in space travel and optimum use of in-situ resources. As for crops good to be grown on space, including Mars, scientists have identified too many. Mars-specific crops include tomato, leek, radish, rye, quinoa, potato, and chives. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


STUART, FL--(Marketwired - November 09, 2016) - Ecosphere Technologies, Inc. ( : ESPH), a technology development and intellectual property licensing company, today announced that its majority owned subsidiary, Sea of Green Systems, Inc. ("SOGS"), has executed a Technology Licensing Agreement with Ecosphere Development Company, LLC ("EDC"), a wholly owned subsidiary of Ecosphere Technologies, that designs, builds and leases turnkey growing facilities that utilize SOGS products, technologies, software, nutrients and Agronomic consulting services. In exchange for this right, EDC expects to pay SOGS an agreed upon monthly licensing fee for each growing facility that EDC builds and leases to licensed marijuana growers. As part of its first installation in Washington State, EDC is constructing Phase 1 of its 6 acre Cannatech Agriculture Center that at complete build out will include up to forty-thousand square feet of growing canopy that is split among four licensed, Tier II tenants or ten-thousand square feet per tenant. Each Cannatech Ag Center will be a turnkey, high tech growing facility that incorporates SOGS Precision Agriculture technologies to maximize quality and increase plant yield. EDC plans to build and lease each Cannatech Ag Center to licensed I-502 growers in Washington State that will pay monthly rent and licensing fees to EDC for the use of the facility, complete with SOGS proprietary growing technologies and nutrients. EDC has begun construction of Phase 1 and has signed preliminary leases with its first tenant. Upon completion of construction and the granting of a license to the tenant -- which can only occur after completion of construction -- the tenant intends to commence growing marijuana in accordance with Washington State law. For each one of the four Phases of the Cannatech Ag Center, EDC expects to compensate SOGS $25,000 per month in Technology Licensing and Royalty Payments for the life of the lease term or $100,000 per month, which will equate to $1,200,000 per year for potentially up to 30 years. Corey McGuire, CEO of Sea of Green Systems, stated "SOGS has worked closely with Ecosphere and EDC over the past 2-years to assist in the designing of EDC's turnkey, high tech growing facilities. Not only will EDC be incorporating SOGS Precision Agriculture technologies into its facilities, but EDC has also engaged SOGS to provide Agronomic Consulting Services to its tenants as a holistic approach to ensure high quality and optimum yields. We are excited to be providing our proprietary technologies to EDC as it constructs Phase 1 of this first project and see this as an important step forward in designing, building and leasing turnkey growing facilities to licensed growers in the fast growing, medical and recreational marijuana industry." McGuire continued, "Collectively, we plan to design, build and lease turnkey growing facilities not just in Washington State, but throughout the entire United States market where States have approved either medical and or recreational use of marijuana. This monthly, recurring revenue contract is expected to provide SOGS and its shareholders with a significant opportunity to start monetizing its IP." Dennis McGuire, Chairman and CEO of Ecosphere Technologies, said "EDC has spent the past 2 plus years locating and acquiring its land in Washington State, designing its facilities and structuring a business model for the shareholders of Ecosphere Technologies that is expected to generate significant monthly recurring revenues over a potential lease term of up to 30 years. Rather than leasing buildings or warehouses with no technology in them, to an industry that will continue to require large volumes of commercial space, EDC is building the most state-of-the-art, turnkey "Smart" growing facilities that have been engineered to produce consistent, high quality, increased yields. By utilizing SOGS technology and services, we expect to be able to charge a premium monthly rental fee to our tenants while supplying them with the most state-of-the-art "Smart" growing facilities in Washington State." McGuire continued, "SOGS Precision Agriculture Technologies are at the leading edge of what is currently available in the commercial marijuana industry as well as the commercial agriculture industry. Growers that use SOGS "Smart" technologies to monitor and control the air temperature, humidity, CO2, light levels above the plant canopy, while controlling water temperatures, DO, pH, EC, and ORP in the nutrients the plants use for photosynthesis will reduce the stress events on marijuana plants and allow them to grow to their maximum potential. Our customers have had great success growing high quality medical marijuana this past year using SOGS technology in our ECOS GROWCUBE® both in Nevada and Washington State. Additionally, SOGS CAVISONIX® treated EcosGROW and EcosBLOOM plant nutrient formulas have been used on tomatoes, blueberries, watermelons and commercial sod applications with great success, increasing plant yields and times to harvest. " Sea of Green Systems, Inc. ("SOGS") is a majority-owned subsidiary of Ecosphere Technologies that sells high-tech growing equipment and nutrients to the Precision Agriculture industry. With a global field-of-use license to Ecosphere's multi-patented OZONIX® water treatment technology and CAVISONIX® nutrient-mixing technology, SOGS is well positioned to deliver engineered solutions to the Agriculture industry worldwide. For more information, please visit http://www.EcosphereTech.com/Divisions/Sea-of-Green-Systems OR https://www.SeaofGreenSystems.com Ecosphere Development Company, LLC. ("EDC") is a wholly owned subsidiary of Ecosphere Technologies that was organized to develop and lease turnkey, high tech Agricultural Centers in locations around the United States that are geographically, politically and economically well positioned. EDC's first project is located in Southeastern Washington State, where water and natural resources are plentiful, with over 300 days of sunshine per year. For more information, please visit http://www.EcosphereTech.com/Divisions/Ecosphere-Development-Company Ecosphere Technologies, Inc. ( : ESPH) is a technology development and intellectual property licensing company that develops environmental solutions for global water, energy, industrial and agricultural markets. We help industry increase production, reduce costs, and protect the environment through a portfolio of unique, patented technologies: technologies like Ozonix®, the Ecos PowerCube® and the Ecos GrowCube™, which are available for sale, as well as exclusive and nonexclusive licensing opportunities across a wide range of industries and applications throughout the world. Our technologies and products are available through multiple brands and subsidiaries that include Sea of Green Systems, Ecosphere Development Company and Fidelity National Environmental Solutions For more information, please visit www.EcosphereTech.com For investor related inquiries or to stay informed of news and events, join Ecosphere's email list by visiting us at www.EcosphereTech.com. This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements regarding the construction and development of EDC's growing facilities and the receipt of revenues, SOGS expected future revenues, SOGS future services, EDC's anticipated premium rental fees, EDC's plans with respect to the Cannatech Agricultural Center in Washington State and elsewhere, and expected improvements in crop yields. The words "believe," "may," "estimate," "continue," "anticipate," "intend," "should," "plan," "could," "target," "potential," "is likely," "will," "expect" and similar expressions, as they relate to us, are intended to identify forward-looking statements. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events and trends that we believe may affect results of operations and business strategy. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ from those in the forward-looking statements include EDC's ability to complete construction within budget, the ability of EDC's tenants to successfully grow marijuana, and developments affecting the price of marijuana and other crops. Further information related to risks affecting us and our subsidiaries is contained in our filings with the SEC, including our Form 10-K filed on April 14, 2016. Any forward-looking statement made by us herein speaks only as of the date on which it is made. Factors or events that could cause our actual results to differ may emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all of them. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as may be required by law.


Philips Lighting has collaborated with The University of Arizona Controlled Environment Agriculture Center (CEAC) to test energy efficient ways to grow food that will help feed astronauts on missions to the moon, Mars and beyond. A recent study, conducted over a nine week period, found that replacing water-cooled high-pressure sodium (HPS) systems with energy efficient LED lighting from Philips in a prototype lunar greenhouse resulted in an increased amount of high-quality edible lettuce while dramatically improving operational efficiency and use of resources. Lettuce grown under Philips LED modules achieved up to 54 grams/kWh of fresh weight, edible lettuce compared to lettuce grown under a high pressure sodium system which achieved only 24 grams/kWh of fresh weight, edible lettuce. This represents an energy savings of 56%.


STUART, FL--(Marketwired - November 22, 2016) - Ecosphere Technologies, Inc. ( : ESPH), a technology development and intellectual property licensing company, today announced that its wholly owned subsidiary, Ecosphere Development Company, LLC ("EDC"), received its building permit for the first phase of its Cannatech Agriculture Center in Finley, Washington. A Groundbreaking Ceremony was held on November 18th and was attended by Ecosphere's Dennis McGuire Sr., Dennis McGuire Jr., Corey McGuire, Pete Grosso, and William Mckay of McKay Construction. In addition to the Groundbreaking Ceremony and Event, EDC's Custom-Designed Greenhouses and Buildings have arrived and are on location to be erected. To view pictures from the event, please visit: http://www.ecospheretech.com/water-recycling-news/blog/post?id=6748 As part of its first installation in Washington State, EDC is constructing Phase 1 of its 6 acre Cannatech Ag Center that at complete build out will include up to forty-thousand square feet of growing canopy that is split among four licensed, Tier II tenants or ten-thousand square feet per tenant. Each Cannatech Ag Center will be a turnkey, high tech growing facility that will maximize quality and increase plant yield. EDC plans to build and lease each Cannatech Ag Center to licensed I-502 growers in Washington State that will pay monthly rent and licensing fees to EDC for the use of the facility, EDC has begun construction of Phase 1 and has signed preliminary leases with its first tenant. Upon completion of construction and the granting of a license to the tenant -- which can only occur after completion of construction -- the tenant intends to commence growing marijuana in accordance with Washington State law. Dennis McGuire, Chairman and CEO of Ecosphere, said, "This Groundbreaking Event marks a significant step forward for the Shareholders of Ecosphere and the unique Business Model that has been developed with EDC. We have spent the past 2 plus years locating and acquiring our land in Washington State, designing our facilities and structuring a business model that is expected to generate significant monthly recurring revenues over a potential lease term of up to 30 years." McGuire continued, "Rather than leasing buildings or warehouses with no technology in them, EDC is building the most state-of-the-art, turnkey 'Smart' growing facilities that have been engineered to produce consistent, high quality, increased plant yields. We plan to replicate this model of designing, building and leasing turnkey growing facilities not just in Washington State, but throughout the entire United States market where States have approved either medical and or recreational use of marijuana." About Ecosphere Development Company Ecosphere Development Company, LLC. ("EDC") is a wholly owned subsidiary of Ecosphere Technologies that was organized to develop and lease turnkey, high tech Agricultural Centers in locations around the United States that are geographically, politically and economically well positioned. EDC's first project is located in Southeastern Washington State, where water and natural resources are plentiful, with over 300 days of sunshine per year. For more information, please visit http://www.EcosphereTech.com/Divisions/Ecosphere-Development-Company About Ecosphere Technologies Ecosphere Technologies, Inc. ( : ESPH) is a technology development and intellectual property licensing company that develops environmental solutions for global water, energy, industrial and agricultural markets. We help industry increase production, reduce costs, and protect the environment through a portfolio of unique, patented technologies: technologies like Ozonix®, the Ecos PowerCube® and the Ecos GrowCube™, which are available for sale, as well as exclusive and nonexclusive licensing opportunities across a wide range of industries and applications throughout the world. Our technologies and products are available through multiple brands and subsidiaries that include Sea of Green Systems, Ecosphere Development Company and Fidelity National Environmental Solutions. For more information, please visit www.EcosphereTech.com For investor related inquiries or to stay informed of news and events, join Ecosphere's email list by visiting us at http://ir.stockpr.com/ecospheretech/request-information. This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements regarding the construction and development of EDC's growing facilities and the receipt of revenues, and, EDC's plans with respect to the Cannatech Agricultural Center in Washington State and elsewhere. The words "believe," "may," "estimate," "continue," "anticipate," "intend," "should," "plan," "could," "target," "potential," "is likely," "will," "expect" and similar expressions, as they relate to us, are intended to identify forward-looking statements. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events and trends that we believe may affect results of operations and business strategy. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ from those in the forward-looking statements include EDC's ability to complete construction within budget, the ability of EDC's tenants to successfully grow marijuana, and developments affecting the price of marijuana and other crops. Further information related to risks affecting us and our subsidiaries is contained in our filings with the SEC, including our Form 10-K filed on April 14, 2016. Any forward-looking statement made by us herein speaks only as of the date on which it is made. Factors or events that could cause our actual results to differ may emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all of them. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as may be required by law.


News Article | September 9, 2016
Site: motherboard.vice.com

Editor's Note: This is the first of two stories about Florida's attempt to control the Zika virus. Ingeborg Cuba, a USDA researcher, swiftly stuck her arms into boxes swarming with 200 mosquitoes. It was late August, and after a particularly intense summer, she knew the work done at this US Department of Agriculture mosquito lab could help her pregnant friends in Miami. Back in July, Florida became the first state to be hit by locally transmitted Zika, a mosquito-borne virus that can cause severe brain damage, especially in developing babies, according to the Florida Department of Health. The environment here makes it an ideal breeding ground for the virus, which has spread locally in the state to 43 people as of Sept. 8. But it still caught everyone by surprise in Miami-Dade and Pinellas counties, and the cases continue to stack up, with eight more reported this month, according to the CDC. Now, while the federal government continues to delay the release of $1.1 billion in funds to fight Zika, Florida’s communities and institutions have stepped up to the challenge, from the streets of Miami to university laboratories. USDA entomologist Dan Kline stands by a mosquito trap, center, in an environment set up to mimic a South Florida backyard. Image: Meredith Rutland Bauer Cuba’s friends and family didn’t always understand why she wanted to study mosquitoes earlier in her career. Now, with Zika in their backyards, they see how a tiny insect can grip the attention of a nation. “They start to see how scary this bug really is,” Cuba said, her arms surrounded by tiny, sterile swarms. At the US Department of Agriculture Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Research in Gainesville, Florida, researchers like Cuba breed 10 types of mosquitoes—the world's worst offenders when it comes to spreading fatal or deforming diseases, the entomologists told me. Prior to the outbreak, there wasn't enough funding to get the mosquitoes under control in Miami-Dade County, which is home to about 2.6 million people. The problem was exacerbated when Florida’s Governor Rick Scott slashed statewide funding for mosquito control districts in 2011 by 40 percent—from $2.16 million to $1.29 million, according to Politico. But after Zika cases started trickling in, Scott dedicated $26.2 million in June to stopping Zika, the governor’s office stated. Florida politicians are urging the federal government to pitch in to squash the virus faster. US Rep. David Jolly, who represents Pinellas County, brought a jar of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to the House floor this week to help Representatives visualize the issue, but they have yet to approve the bill. “Can you imagine, colleagues, the fear and anxiety in this chamber if these 100 mosquitoes were outside this jar, not inside this jar?” Jolly said in his House address. “The time for the politics of Zika is over. The politics of Zika are garbage right now.” The Zika virus can be spread by two types of mosquitoes and through sexual contact, but it largely relies on Aedes aegypti, the same culprit behind dengue and yellow fever. This type of mosquito is as common as a summer's day puddle—where their lives often begin. The researchers at this USDA lab in Gainesville have been studying Aedes aegypti for years, and their focus has intensified in the wake of Zika's spread. And the more the researchers learn, the more they hate this strange bug. Mosquitoes usually breed in large, stagnant pools, hunt during dusk and dawn and fly around in plain sight. But Aedes aegypti are a sneaky enemy. They fly low to the ground, biting ankles and flitting away. They hunt day or night. And unlike most other types of mosquito, they've adapted to live alongside humans, specifically hunting out human blood. They can also go entire generations without leaving someone’s home, said Dan Kline, a USDA entomologist. “You hit their closet, and all these mosquitoes come flying out,” he said, describing his work internationally fighting the mosquito. “Thailand, Brazil—it’s an indoor mosquito.” Dan Kline with a sheet of Aedes aegypti eggs, each the size of a period. Image: Meredith Rutland Bauer Kline led me around the Gainesville lab last month, wrestling open a sealed door inside a lab prep room. Stacks of pale plastic bins lined the walls, and a dank, oppressive smell made me feel like the air around me just got heavier. "Ammonia," Kline explained. The containers are faux swamps, and they hold developing larval mosquitoes. Some will grow up to be adult mosquitoes which are used to test pesticides and repellants, and others will be used to test how well larvicides, which are pesticides that kill juvenile mosquitoes, work on various species. Kline said the lab also works on testing mosquito traps. Traps are mostly used by pest control regulators and scientists to wrangle up local bugs to test for certain viruses. When state officials announced last week that they'd captured mosquitoes infected with Zika, it was by using these traps. The current traps rely on colors and manufactured attractants (mostly chemical mixes meant to emulate human sweat and breath) to funnel the mosquitoes into a vacuum. But researchers at this lab and at others are also working on cutting-edge traps—ones that may eventually help the world's poorest families to weed out mosquitoes. Aedes aegypti usually lay the eggs in multiple spots. And they lay their eggs just above the waterline of any small container, rather than in the shallows of stagnant ponds like most mosquitoes. The eggs can survive unhatched for a dry summer or a cold winter. One brisk shower is enough to hatch them into larvae within minutes—within a week, they'll be mature and biting. Hundreds of mosquitoes swarm inside a holding container inside a USDA lab. The mosquitoes are fed meals of sugar cubes and blood. Image: Meredith Rutland Bauer “It could be be bottle caps, discarded cups. It could be snail shells. It could be coconut husks,” Roxanne Connelly, University of Florida entomology professor and entomology specialist for a statewide agricultural network, told me. “It could be literally anything.” This means scientists are left to fight and trap an almost-invisible enemy. Any speck of dirt can be a tiny Aedes aegypti egg. Any dark corner can hold a Zika-infested mosquito. Any hint of a raincloud can be a harbinger of disease. But if a specific flower is around, they'll lay nearly all of their eggs on that flower. Similarly, traps have long used carbon dioxide and other chemicals mosquitoes use to track down humans. Read more: How Canadian Scientists Plan to Fight Zika With Old Tires and Milk Kline has started to learn their game. He recently discovered that the mosquitos love smelly socks by conducting an experiment where he put 200 mosquitoes in a box and baited a trap with carbon dioxide and a smelly sock. “I got 199,” he said, smiling. Researchers are now working on ways to make these habits fatal to the mosquitoes. Outside the USDA lab, Kline and I sloshed our way through wet grass toward a mosquito trap testing area. The story-high screened-in rectangle seems out of place by the red brick buildings. The Army tent inside is even more jarring. Next door, bug screens surround lines of hedges and a white-roofed pergola. An Army tent sits in a screened-off area outside a Gainesville, Florida where scientists test repellants, USDA lab. Image: Meredith Rutland Bauer Researchers have to test the traps, repellents and pesticides in various environments. Decades ago, one of these areas held a jungle environment when the lab was preparing materials for Vietnam soldiers. Now, they’re set up like a typical South Florida backyard. The traps will mostly be used to see how many mosquitoes are in an area, and whether they have Zika—a sort of entomological census. Kline often tests new products from different companies, to see if they’re better than what the federal government is recommending. If the traps become really good, people might one day be able to set them inside their homes like ant traps. But for now, he said, bug spray and a fly swatter are still the better weapons. And there’s still no better bait than a human arm.


VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - Dec. 5, 2016) - Affinor Growers (CSE:AFI)(CSE:AFI.CN)(FRANKFURT:1AF)(OTCQB:RSSFF) ("Affinor" or the "Corporation), is pleased to announce it has installed the second vertical growing tower with the University of the Fraser Valley Agriculture Training and Research Demonstration Greenhouse at the John Volken Academy in Surrey, British Columbia. The four level automated tower will allow Affinor Growers to continue to demonstrate and validate various crop models, and continue selling license agreements. The tower will be planted with strawberries in January 2017 and holds 265 plants in a little over 100 square feet. The new equipment will double the production of the first tower installed last April 2016 and more than triples the production per square meter when compared to the traditional soil beds within the same greenhouse. The nature of the install is to continue to grow and confirm yields and viability of the technology with commercial plant density conditions. Jarrett Malnarick, President and CEO "Affinor is excited with our on-going work at the UFV BC Agriculture Center of Excellence and continuing our relationship for agri-tech innovation and research to validate agriculture crop models for our technology while providing valuable agriculture skills training opportunities." Affinor Growers is a publicly traded company on the Canadian Securities Exchange under the symbol ("AFI"). Affinor is focused on growing high quality crops such as romaine lettuce, spinach, strawberries using its vertical farming techniques. Affinor is committed to becoming a pre-eminent supplier and grower, using exclusive vertical farming techniques. On Behalf of the Board of Directors The CSE has not reviewed and does not accept responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. This News Release contains forward-looking statements. The use of any of the words "anticipate", "continue", "estimate", "expect", "may", "will", "project", "should", "believe" and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Although the Company believes that the expectations and assumptions on which the forward-looking statements are based are reasonable, undue reliance should not be placed on the forward-looking statements because the Company can give no assurance that they will prove to be correct. Since forward-looking statements address future events and conditions, by their very nature they involve inherent risks and uncertainties. These statements speak only as of the date of this News Release. Actual results could differ materially from those currently anticipated due to a number of factors and risks including various risk factors discussed in the Company's disclosure documents which can be found under the Company's profile on www.sedar.com. This News Release contains "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended and such forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.


Stanford K.,Agriculture Center | Hannon S.,Feedlot Health Management Services Ltd | Booker C.W.,Feedlot Health Management Services Ltd | Jim G.K.,Feedlot Health Management Services Ltd
Foodborne Pathogens and Disease | Year: 2014

To evaluate the efficacy of a type-III secreted proteins vaccine and a Lactobacillus-acidophilus-based direct-fed microbial (DFM) for controlling Escherichia coli O157:H7, cattle (n=864) were allocated to the following groups: DFM, finishing diets containing 109 colony-forming units (CFU)/animal/day L. acidophilus and Propionibacterium freudenreichii; VAC, finishing diets and 2mL intramuscular injection of vaccine at allocation and 28 days later; or CON, finishing diets only. Cattle within replicates were stratified by initial levels of E. coli O157:H7 and randomized to experimental groups, with 30 pens allocated on June 15, 2011 (AS1), 18 pens allocated on June 28, 2011 (AS2), and 18 cattle per pen. Rectal fecal samples and perineal swabs were collected at 28-day intervals until shipment to slaughter (103-145 days on trial). Numbers of cattle with enumerable E. coli O157:H7 (≥1.6 CFU/g feces) were reduced in AS1 and AS2 by VAC (p=0.008), although interventions had no impact on numbers of E. coli O157:H7 shed. For AS1, VAC reduced prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in feces (p=0.03) and perineal swabs (p=0.04) in the feeding period but not at shipment to slaughter. For AS2, prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 was not reduced in either feces or perineal swabs by VAC at any time. For AS1, DFM reduced prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in perineal swabs (p=0.01) during the feeding period. For AS2, DFM increased E. coli O157:H7 detection in feces (p=0.03) and perineal swabs (p=0.01) at shipment to slaughter. Seventy-five percent of AS1 E. coli O157:H7 isolates had only stx1, while 87% of AS2 isolates had stx1 and stx2 genes. Of the two interventions, VAC shows the most potential for pre-harvest control of E. coli O157:H7, but due to variable efficacy of both DFM and VAC, additional product development is necessary to ensure more consistent pre-harvest control of E. coli O157:H7. © 2014 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Reuter T.,Agriculture Center | Alexander T.W.,University of Vermont | McAllister T.A.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2011

Safe disposal of dead livestock and contaminated manure is essential for the effective control of infectious disease outbreaks. Composting has been shown to be an effective method of disposal, but no information exists on its ability to contain diseases caused by spore-forming bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis. Duplicate composters (east and west), each containing 16 dead cattle, were constructed (final capacity, 85,000 kg). Spores (10 7 CFU/g manure) of Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus thuringiensis were mixed with autoclaved feedlot manure and placed in either sterile vials or porous nylon bags. Compost temperatures in the west composter were slightly higher than in the east composter. Viable B. thuringiensis spores were reduced to ≤10 2 CFU in all samples after 112 days but were isolated from bags (west composter) at ≤10 2 and at 10 5 CFU (east composter) after 230 days. In contrast, B. licheniformis was at ≤10 2 CFU in vials (west composter) after 112 days but remained at 10 6 CFU after 230 days (east composter). Similarly, B. licheniformis in bags was not detected after 230 days in the west composter but remained at 10 7 CFU in the east composter. Our study suggests that spore viability was reduced in the west composter by exposure to compost and elevated temperatures over time. Different temperature profiles may explain why spores remained viable in the east structure but were largely rendered nonviable in the west structure. Under practical conditions, variation in composting microclimates may preclude the complete inactivation of Bacillus spores, including those of B. anthracis, during composting. However, composting may still have merit as a method of biocontainment, reducing and diluting the transfer of infectious spores into the environment. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.


Stanford K.,Agriculture Center | Koohmaraie M.,Forest Laboratories | Gill C.O.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada
Journal of Food Protection | Year: 2013

Due to the expense of monitoring multiple serotypes of Escherichia coli at slaughter, a study was conducted at a beef abattoir in southern Alberta to determine relationships between E. coli and E. coli O157:H7 on hides. Swab samples were collected from carcasses immediately prior to hide removal over 8 weeks in summer (n = 591) and winter (n = 686). Detection of E. coli was highest in summer (P , 0.05), although detection of E. coli O157:H7 did not differ by season. Numbers of E. coli did not vary by season, but were affected by slaughter plant hygiene schedules. E. coli O157:H7 was more likely (P , 0.001) to be detected on hides of carcasses with the most E. coli (.3.5 log CFU/50 cm2). For E. coli ,3.5 log CFU/50 cm2, the likelihood of detecting E. coli O157:H7 did not differ. Consequently, for 83% of carcasses, there was no relationship between numbers of E. coli and detection of E. coli O157:H7 on hides. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection.

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