Agricultural Research Council Roodeplaat Vegetable and Ornamental Plant Institute ARC Roodeplaat VOPI

Pretoria, South Africa

Agricultural Research Council Roodeplaat Vegetable and Ornamental Plant Institute ARC Roodeplaat VOPI

Pretoria, South Africa

Time filter

Source Type

Laurie S.M.,Agricultural Research Council Roodeplaat Vegetable and Ornamental Plant Institute ARC Roodeplaat VOPI | Faber M.,Nutritional Intervention Research Unit | Calitz F.J.,Agricultural Research Council Biometry Unit | Moelich E.I.,Stellenbosch University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture | Year: 2013

Background: As eating quality is important for adoption of new varieties, nine orange-fleshed and three cream-fleshed sweet potato varieties were assessed for sensory characteristics, dry mass and free sugar content, instrumental texture and colour and consumer acceptability (n= 216) in a peri-urban South African setting. Results: Cream-fleshed varieties were higher in yellow-green colour and sweet potato-like flavour and lower in graininess. Orange-fleshed varieties were higher in pumpkin-like flavour, orange colour, discolouration and sucrose content. Partial least squares regression analysis showed that the most accepted varieties (Impilo, Excel, Resisto, 2001_5_2, Serolane, W-119 and Monate) were associated with sweet flavour, dry mass and maltose content, while the least accepted varieties (Beauregard, Khano and 1999_1_7) were associated with wateriness. Pearson correlation analysis highlighted correlations of sensory attributes yellow and orange with instrumental colour measurements (colour a* and colour b*), instrumental firmness with sensory firmness, dry mass with sensory wateriness, and maltose content with sensory sweet and sweet potato-like flavour. The varieties were clustered into three groups. Consumer acceptability for eating quality correlated with maltose content, dry mass and sweet flavour. Conclusion: Chemical and instrumental measurements were identified to evaluate key attributes and will be useful in the intermediate phases of sweet potato varietal development. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.


PubMed | Agricultural Research Council Roodeplaat Vegetable and Ornamental Plant Institute ARC Roodeplaat VOPI
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the science of food and agriculture | Year: 2013

As eating quality is important for adoption of new varieties, nine orange-fleshed and three cream-fleshed sweet potato varieties were assessed for sensory characteristics, dry mass and free sugar content, instrumental texture and colour and consumer acceptability (n = 216) in a peri-urban South African setting.Cream-fleshed varieties were higher in yellow-green colour and sweet potato-like flavour and lower in graininess. Orange-fleshed varieties were higher in pumpkin-like flavour, orange colour, discolouration and sucrose content. Partial least squares regression analysis showed that the most accepted varieties (Impilo, Excel, Resisto, 2001_5_2, Serolane, W-119 and Monate) were associated with sweet flavour, dry mass and maltose content, while the least accepted varieties (Beauregard, Khano and 1999_1_7) were associated with wateriness. Pearson correlation analysis highlighted correlations of sensory attributes yellow and orange with instrumental colour measurements (colour a* and colour b*), instrumental firmness with sensory firmness, dry mass with sensory wateriness, and maltose content with sensory sweet and sweet potato-like flavour. The varieties were clustered into three groups. Consumer acceptability for eating quality correlated with maltose content, dry mass and sweet flavour.Chemical and instrumental measurements were identified to evaluate key attributes and will be useful in the intermediate phases of sweet potato varietal development.

Loading Agricultural Research Council Roodeplaat Vegetable and Ornamental Plant Institute ARC Roodeplaat VOPI collaborators
Loading Agricultural Research Council Roodeplaat Vegetable and Ornamental Plant Institute ARC Roodeplaat VOPI collaborators