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Tzouramani I.,Agricultural Economics and Policy Research Institute | Liontakis A.,Agricultural University of Athens | Sintori A.,Agricultural University of Athens | Alexopoulos G.,Agricultural University of Athens
Outlook on Agriculture | Year: 2013

Organic farming has grown rapidly in the European Union (EU) due toa rising demand for high-quality food, increased environmental concerns andmarket developments that led to the implementation of an organic policy and thecreation of a positive institutional framework. Nevertheless, the production oforganic fruit, including cherries, is still limited within the EU, despite highdemand. Farmers generally adopt organic farming systems only if the supportprovided by the existing policy regime outweighs the increased risk and uncertainty. This study explores the effectiveness of current policy measures for the production oforganic cherries in Greece using a real options methodology. The results reveal thatthe economic incentives provided by the existing policy regime contribute toprofitability and compensate for the risk and uncertainty that organic cherryfarmers face, although further institutional support is still needed. Source


Iliopoulos C.,Agricultural Economics and Policy Research Institute | Valentinov V.,Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Central and Eastern Europe
Outlook on Agriculture | Year: 2012

This paper compares the new institutional economics literature on agricultural cooperatives with their actual operation in Greece. The key contrast revealed by the comparison concerns the role of opportunism. New institutional economics explains cooperatives in terms of their ability to combat external opportunism, subject to the constraints of internal opportunism. In contrast, in Greek agricultural cooperatives internal opportunism is shown to inflate the formal organizational structure and to lower the cooperative's effectiveness in serving its members. The paper discusses some of the theoretical, policy and practical implications of this argument. Source


Tzouramani I.,Agricultural Economics and Policy Research Institute | Alexopoulos G.,Agricultural University of Athens | Kostianis G.,Agricultural University of Athens | Kazakopoulos L.,Agricultural University of Athens
Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems | Year: 2014

This study attempts to enrich the debate on the different forms of risk management strategies that are utilized by organic farmers and to assess the internal dynamics within the organic farming community by examining the attitudes and practices of these farmers. In particular, using a factor analysis, this study determines the attitudes of Greek farmers toward risk management strategies and focuses on the differences in risk attitudes between existing organic farmers and non-organic farmers. Second, using a probit analysis, this study characterizes the key factors that affect Greek farmers' attitudes with respect to risk management strategies. The thorough presentation of this research study provides essential information to policy-makers for understanding the factors that induce farmers to participate in organic agriculture. Moreover, the analysis of the risk management strategies that organic farmers apply is expected to offer valuable insights that will be critical for the timely introduction and efficient application of the forthcoming post-2013 Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) measures. Copyright © 2013 Cambridge University Press. Source


Valentinov V.,Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Central and Eastern Europe | Iliopoulos C.,Agricultural Economics and Policy Research Institute
German Journal of Agricultural Economics | Year: 2012

New institutional economists have identified a number of property rights problems in agricultural cooperatives. This paper reconsiders these problems from the perspective of heterodox institutionalist economics in the tradition of Veblen and Ayres. The property rights problems of agricultural cooperatives seemingly reinforce the new institutional economics presumption of the superiority of fully delineated private ownership. In contrast, the paper shows these problems to be likewise consistent with the heterodox institutionalist school, which is much more reserved about the societal role of private ownership. Toward this end, the paper elaborates the logical structure of the so-called "institutionalist dichotomy". The property rights problems of agricultural cooperatives are explained as a particular manifestation of this dichotomy. Source

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