Agrarian Technological Institute of Castilla and Leon ITACyL

Valladolid, Spain

Agrarian Technological Institute of Castilla and Leon ITACyL

Valladolid, Spain
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Albertos I.,Agrarian Technological Institute of Castilla and Leon ITACyL | Rico D.,Agrarian Technological Institute of Castilla and Leon ITACyL | Diez A.M.,University of Burgos | Gonzalez-Arnaiz L.,Agrarian Technological Institute of Castilla and Leon ITACyL | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND: The inhibitory effect of chitosan films with clove oil (0-50 g kg-1) was evaluated on a range of ten representative food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. RESULTS: The most sensitive bacteria to the films was Shewanella putrefaciens and the most resistant was Aeromonas hydrophila (inhibition was apparent only at 50 g kg-1 clove essential oil (CEO)). Films with 20 g kg-1 CEO inhibited nine of ten of the bacteria tested. Chitosan films with 20 g kg-1 CEO were combined with high-pressure (HPP) processing as treatments for trout fillets, and changes in physicochemical parameters and microbial load were evaluated at 4 °C over 22 days of storage. The films reduced weight loss and water activity compared to fresh and treated samples (HPP and cooking). Results showed that microbial load (total aerobic mesophilic, lactic acid bacteria and total coliform) of the trout fillets covered with chitosan films was lower than that for HPP-treated samples, and similar to cooked samples, except for coliform counts. CONCLUSION: The use of 20 g kg-1 CEO-chitosan films showed a further improvement in the shelf-life of trout fillets when compared to that obtained with HPP and cooking treatment. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.


Albertos I.,Agrarian Technological Institute of Castilla and Leon ITACyL | Gringer N.,Technical University of Denmark | Rico D.,Agrarian Technological Institute of Castilla and Leon ITACyL | Baron C.P.,Technical University of Denmark
Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies | Year: 2016

The objective of this study was to characterise herring brine and assess its use as natural antioxidant in herring preservation. Herring brines from different marinated products (brine from fillet-ripened spice-cured herring SC, traditional barrel-salted spice-cured herring TSp and brine from traditional barrel-salted herring TSa) were used without any pre-treatment or with a previous pH adjustment, and tested either as coating agents (glazing) for frozen herring or additives in fresh mince herring, in order to prevent oxidation. TSa and TSp were the most effective glazing agents, retarding lipid oxidation. Brines tested as additive retarded lipid and protein oxidation in a similar trend than herring mince containing salt and/or protein. SC brine was more efficient against lipid and protein oxidation when compared to the other tested brines. Using protein fractions isolated from herring marinating brines as glazing or additive seems feasible for preventing oxidation of both frozen and fresh herring. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

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