Agra University

Āgra, India

Agra University

Āgra, India
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Yadav A.,Aligarh Muslim University | Yadav A.,Guru Ghasidas University | Sharma V.R.,Aligarh Muslim University | Singh P.P.,Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research | And 7 more authors.
EPJ Web of Conferences | Year: 2012

This paper deals with the dependence of incomplete fusion reaction dynamics on various entrance channel parameters, specially, the alpha-Q-value effect. The excitation functions for several radio-nuclides formed in 13C+159Tb interactions at ≈ 4-7 AMeV have been measured using activation technique followed by γ-spectroscopy. The experimentally measured excitation functions have been analyzed in the framework of statistical model code PACE4. A sizeable contribution of incomplete fusion has been delineated in the production of α-emitting channels in reference to the Monte Carlo simulation based statistical model code PACE4. For better insights into the onset and strength of incomplete fusion, the incomplete fusion strength function has been deduced as a function of various entrance channel parameters. A significant amount of incomplete fusion contribution has been observed at slightly above barrier energies, and found to increase smoothly with incident projectile energy. Present results have also been compared with the results obtained in the interactions of 16O and 12C with same target 159Tb, to probe the dependence of incomplete fusion on projectile, specially, on the binding energy & alpha-Q-value. The present work in light of previous data hints that instead of binding energy, the alpha-Q-value of the projectile is a parameter which influences the in-complete fusion reaction dynamics. © Owned by the authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2012.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

AMHERST, NY, February 24, 2017-- Dr. Prem Datta Bharadwaj has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Recognized for five and a half decades of invaluable contributions to his field, Dr. Bharadwaj has parlayed his knowledge into the field of physics education. Prior to embarking on his career, he earned a Bachelor of Science from NREC College Khurja (Agra University) with merit in 1950 and then a Master of Science in Physics with 1st Division and 1st Position from Agra College, Agra (Agra University) in 1952. He then joined B.R. College Agra as an assistant professor of physics, where he remained for two years before working for another two as a physics lecturer at GPIC Tehri Garhwal. Dr. Bharadwaj transferred to Government College Meerut, where he acted as a lecturer in physics for three years. He then returned to B.R. College Agra as an assistant professor of physics for one year.Dr. Bharadwaj came to the United States in 1960 as a graduate assistant in the Physics Department of SUNY Buffalo. After finishing most of the requirements for a Ph.D. in 1962, he was appointed as Assistant Professor of Physics at Niagara University and had to wait for two years for his Ph.D. according to the rules of the Physics Department at SUNY Buffalo. After working for two years, and doing research, his Ph.D. was confirmed in 1964. In 1964 he was promoted to the position of Associate Professor of Physics. In 1966 he was promoted to the position of Professor of Physics, and continued working in that role until 2007. He served as Chairman of the Physics Department for 10 years, from 1976 to 1986.A member of the American Physical Society, Dr. Bharadwaj co-founded the Hindi Samaj of Greater Buffalo in 1986 and the India Association of Buffalo in 1961, and was honored by it in 1997. He has contributed to numerous written works throughout the course of his career, including "Intermediate Agriculture Physics and Climatology," which he co-authored in 1954. He was a consultant to the National Science Foundation from 1966-1971, evaluating undergraduate programs and research grants for all universities and colleges in the U.S. A sterling example of skill in his field, he has won many awards for his stellar work, such as the Rajiv Gandhi National Unity Award for Excellence from the government of India in 1995 and the Hind Rattan (Jewel of India) Award the same year. Also, he was named International Man of the Year by the American Biographical Institute in 1999, and was featured in the 6th through 8th editions of Who's Who in American Education, the 4th through 11th editions of Who's Who in Science and Engineering, the 53rd through 70th editions of Who's Who in America, the 39th through 43rd editions of Who's Who in the East, and the 16th through 33rd editions of Who's Who in the World. Dr. Bharadwaj was also included in other publications including "2,000 Outstanding Scientists of the 20th and 21st Century" and "500 Leaders of Influence" by IBC, Cambridge, England, "2,000 Outstanding People of the 20th and 21st Century, " and "2,000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 20th and 21st Century" by IBC, Cambridge, England. Dr. Bharadwaj was also listed in "1,000 Leaders of World Influence" by the American Biographic Institute" in 2000, and was chosen for appointment to the Research Board of Advisors in 2000.Looking toward the future, Dr. Bharadwaj intends to continue enjoying retirement and devoting himself to spiritual endeavors.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


Sivakumar S.M.,Jazan University | Safhi M.M.,Jazan University | Kannadasan M.,Agra University | Sukumaran N.,Vels University
Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal | Year: 2011

The strategy of World Health Organization is to develop efficient and inexpensive vaccine against various infectious diseases amongst children's population. Vaccination is considered as the most cost effective health intervention known to public. Since 90. years various substances have been added in vaccine formulation but still alum is considered as the safest adjuvant for human use licensed by United States Food and Drug Administration. MF 59 and ASO4 are the adjuvants were developed recently and approved for human use. Due to poor adjuvancity, conventional vaccines require multiple recall injection at approximately time intervals to attain optimal immune response. For past approximately two decades the vaccine research has been focused towards the alternation of alum type of adjuvant in order to increase the immunogenicity. The development of new vaccines, is more efficacious or easier to deliver, or both have become an area of research that can certainly benefit from controlled release technology. Especially, the conversion of multiple administration vaccine into single administration vaccine may represent an improved advancement towards the betterment of human health care and welfare. Biodegradable polymer microparticles have been evaluated for delivering antigens in native form, sustained release keeping in mind the safety aspects. In this article we review the overall concept of adjuvants in vaccine technology with special focus towards the prospects of controlled release antigens. © 2011.


Sivakumar S.M.,Jazan University | Safhi M.M.,Jazan University | Aamena J.,Jazan University | Kannadasan M.,Agra University
Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology | Year: 2013

In recent years, there has been growing interest of developing controlled drug/vaccine delivery system. Many polymers have been focused for delivery systems among them chitosan seems to be a better polymer because of interesting properties such as nontoxic, biocompatible, biodegradable, high charge density, muco adhesive properties, non immunogenic and non carcinogenic. Therefore, chitosan has wide applications in biomedicine, waste water treatment, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. This short review is an attempt to highlight the pharmaceutical applications of chitosan polymer in brief. © RJPT All right reserved.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Promila Mathur, MD, Obstetrician and Gynecologist, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. She is a highly trained and qualified obstetrician and gynecologist with an extensive expertise in all facets of her work. Dr. Promila Mathur has been in practice for more than 50 years, and is currently serving patients within her own practice in Northborough, Massachusetts. Dr. Promila Mathur’s career in medicine began in 1966 when she graduated with her Medical Degree from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences at Agra University, India. Upon relocating to the United States, Dr. Mathur completed a residency at the Harlem Hospital Center. Dr. Mathur is certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and maintains a professional membership with the American Medical Association and the Massachusetts Medical Society. Dr. Mathur attributes her success to her true love for the profession, and when she isn’t assisting patients, enjoys reading the Green Journal. Learn more about Dr. Mathur by reading her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


Sharma K.L.,Indian Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture | Grace J.K.,Indian Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture | Chandrika M.S.,Indian Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture | Vittal K.P.R.,Indian Council of Agricultural Research | And 14 more authors.
Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis | Year: 2014

Rainfed Inceptisol soils, despite their agricultural potential, pose serious problems, including soil erosion, low fertility, nutrient imbalance, and low soil organic matter, and ultimately lead to poor soil quality. To address these constraints, two long-term experiments were initiated to study conservation agricultural practices, comprising conventional and low tillage as well as conjunctive use of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients in Inceptisol soils of Agra center of the All-India Coordinated Research Project for Dryland Agriculture (AICRPDA). The first experiment included tillage and nutrient-management practices, whereas the second studied only conjunctive nutrient-management practices. Both used pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum (L.) Linn) as test crop. These experiments were adopted for soil quality assessment studies at 4 and 8 years after their completion, respectively, at the Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture (CRIDA), Hyderabad, India. Soil quality assessment was done by identifying the key indicators using principal component analysis (PCA), linear scoring technique (LST), soil quality indices (SQI), and relative soil quality indices (RSQI). Results revealed that most of the soil quality parameters were significantly influenced by the management treatments in both the experiments. In experiment 1, soil quality indices varied from 0.86 to 1.08 across the treatments. Tillage as well as the nutrient-management treatments played a significant role in influencing the SQI. Among the tillage practices, low tillage with one interculture + weedicide application resulted in a greater soil quality index (0.98) followed by conventional tillage + one interculture (0.94), which was at par with low tillage + one interculture (0.93). Among the nutrient-management treatments, application of 100% organic sources of nutrients gave the greatest SQI of 1.05, whereas the other two practices of 50% nitrogen (N) (organic) + 50% (inorganic source) (0.92) and 100% N (inorganic source) (0.88) were statistically at par with each other. The various parameters that emerged as key soil quality indicators along with their percentage contributions toward SQI were organic carbon (17%), exchangeable calcium (Ca) (10%), available zinc (Zn) (9%), available copper (Cu) (6%), dehydrogenase assay (6%), microbial biomass carbon (25%) and mean weight diameter of soil aggregates (27%). In experiment 2, SQI varied from 2.33 to 3.47, and 50% urea + 50% farmyard manure (FYM) showed the greatest SQI of 3.47, which was at par with 100% RDF + 25 kg zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) (3.20). Under this set of treatments, the key soil quality indicators and their contributions to SQI were organic carbon (19%), available N (20%), exchangeable Ca (3%), available Zn (4%) and Cu (17%), labile carbon (20%), and mean weight diameter of soil aggregates (17%). The quantitative relationship established in this study between mean pearl millet yields (Y) and RSQI irrespective of the management treatments for both the experiments together could be quite useful to predict the yield quantitatively with respect to a given change in soil quality for these rainfed Inceptisols. The methodology used in this study is not only useful to these Inceptisols but can also be used for varying soil types, climate, and associated conditions elsewhere in the world. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Agrawal K.K.,Agra University | Singh S.V.,A.P.S. University | Rashmikant U.S.,A.P.S. University | Singh R.D.,A.P.S. University | Chand P.,A.P.S. University
Journal of Prosthodontic Research | Year: 2011

Patients: A 45-year-old female patient came to the institute complaining of reduced salivation, pain and food lodgment in multiple teeth, and difficulty in eating. The systemic examination revealed dry eyes, dry mouth, cracking of corners of mouth and lack of appetite. The diagnostic tests were conclusive of Sjogren's syndrome, which is associated with xerostomia, ocular dryness and connective tissue disorders. Major oral problems in such patients include high caries rate, burning of oral mucosa, early tooth loss, increased tooth wear, poor tolerance for dentures and repeated failure of dental restorations. Discussion: Prosthodontic therapy for this unique patient group is challenging and neglected, due to limited choice of abutments, loss of vertical dimension and poor occlusion. Two-year follow up of a patient of Sjogren's syndrome who was rehabilitated by a combination of fixed and removable prostheses, with a simplified palatal salivary reservoir is presented. Conclusion: Though the patient felt an improvement in quality of life due to the prosthesis, slurred speech and frequent reservoir refilling remained problems. © 2011 Published by Elsevier Ireland on behalf of Japan Prosthodontic Society.


PubMed | Agra University
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Journal of prosthodontic research | Year: 2011

A 45-year-old female patient came to the institute complaining of reduced salivation, pain and food lodgment in multiple teeth, and difficulty in eating. The systemic examination revealed dry eyes, dry mouth, cracking of corners of mouth and lack of appetite. The diagnostic tests were conclusive of Sjogrens syndrome, which is associated with xerostomia, ocular dryness and connective tissue disorders. Major oral problems in such patients include high caries rate, burning of oral mucosa, early tooth loss, increased tooth wear, poor tolerance for dentures and repeated failure of dental restorations.Prosthodontic therapy for this unique patient group is challenging and neglected, due to limited choice of abutments, loss of vertical dimension and poor occlusion. Two-year follow up of a patient of Sjogrens syndrome who was rehabilitated by a combination of fixed and removable prostheses, with a simplified palatal salivary reservoir is presented.Though the patient felt an improvement in quality of life due to the prosthesis, slurred speech and frequent reservoir refilling remained problems.


Srivatsava P.K.,Lovely Professional University | Maruthi Sankar G.R.,Indian Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture | Vijaya Kumar P.,Indian Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture | Singh S.P.,Agra University | And 3 more authors.
Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis | Year: 2015

A study was conducted to assess fertilizer effect on pearl millet–wheat yield and plant-soil nutrients with the following treatments: T1, control; T2, 100% nitrogen (N); T3, 100% nitrogen and phosphorus (NP); T4, 100% nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK); T5, 100% NPK + zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) at 25 kg ha−1; T6, 100% NPK + farmyard manure (FYM) at 10 t ha−1; T7, 100% NPK+ verimcompost (VC) at 2.5 tha−1; T8, 100% NPK + sulfur (S) at 25 kg ha−1; T9, FYM at 10 t ha−1; T10, VC at 2.5 t ha−1; T11, 100% NPK + FYM at 10 t ha−1 + 25 kg S ha−1 + ZnSO4 at 25 kg ha−1; and T12, 150% NPK treatments. Treatments differed significantly in influencing soil-plant nutrients and grain and straw yields of both crops. Grain yield had significant correlation with soil-plant N, P, K, S, and zinc (Zn) nutrients. The study indicated superiority of T11 for attaining maximum pearl millet grain yield (2885 kg ha−1) and straw yield (7185 kg ha−1); amounts of N (48.9 kg ha−1), P (8.8 kg ha−1), K (26.3 kg ha−1), S (20.6 kg ha−1), and Zn (0.09 kg ha−1) taken up; and amounts of soil N (187.7 kg ha−1), P (13.7 kg ha−1), K (242.5 kg ha−1), S (10.1 kg ha−1), and Zn (0.70 kg ha−1). It was superior for wheat with grain yield (5215 kg ha−1) and straw yield (7220 kg ha−1); amounts of N (120.7 kg ha−1), P (13.8 kg ha−1), K (30 kg ha−1), S (14.6 kg ha−1), and Zn (0.18 kg ha−1) taken up; and maintaining soil N (185.7 kg ha−1), P (14.5 kg ha−1), K (250.5 kg ha−1), S (10.6 kg ha−1), and Zn (0.73 kg ha−1). Based on the study, 100% NPK + FYM at 10 tha−1 + Zn at 25 kg ha−1 + S at 25 kg ha−1 could be recommended for attaining maximum returns of pearl millet–wheat under semi-arid Inceptisols. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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