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Bonants P.,Wageningen University | Streito J.-C.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Elphinstone J.,Fera | Pottier P.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | And 6 more authors.
EPPO Bulletin | Year: 2016

The ability of National Plant Protection Organizations (NPPOs) and their affiliated laboratories to quickly and reliably detect and identify organisms is critical for the effective performance of phytosanitary measures. Plant pest diagnostics is also essential to support the phytosanitary certification of consignments of plants and plant products exported from the EU. Access to reference material has been identified as a limitation on the ability of laboratories to develop and validate diagnostic tests and ensure the reliability of diagnostics. The EU FP7 Q-collect project worked to establish the state of the art of current phytosanitary collections, to identify gaps and propose minimum quality standards, to facilitate access to specimens and to design and build networks of reference collections. The main results of the project are presented in this paper. © 2016 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2016 OEPP/EPPO


Desilva B.,Bristol Myers Squibb | Garofolo F.,Algorithme Pharma Inc. | Rocci M.,ICON Development Solutions | Martinez S.,Algorithme Pharma Inc. | And 36 more authors.
Bioanalysis | Year: 2012

Over 400 professionals representing pharmaceutical companies, CROs, and multiple regulatory agencies participated in the 6th Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB). Like the previous sessions, this event was in the format of a practical, focused, highly interactive and informative workshop aiming for high-quality, improved regulatory compliance and scientific excellence. Numerous 'hot topics in bioanalysis of both small and large molecules were shared and discussed, leading to consensus and recommendations among panelists and attendees representing the bioanalytical community. The major outcome of this years workshop was the noticeable alignment of multiple bioanalytical guidance/guidelines from different regulatory agencies. This represents a concrete step forward in the global harmonization of bioanalytical activities. The present 2012 White Paper acts as a practical and useful reference document that provides key information and solutions on several topics and issues in the constantly evolving world of bioanalysis. © 2012 Future Science Ltd.


Scheikl U.,Medical University of Vienna | Tsao H.-F.,University of Vienna | Horn M.,University of Vienna | Indra A.,AGES | Walochnik J.,Medical University of Vienna
Parasitology Research | Year: 2016

Free-living amoebae (FLA) are widely spread in the environment and known to cause rare but often serious infections. Besides this, FLA may serve as vehicles for bacterial pathogens. In particular, Legionella pneumophila is known to replicate within FLA thereby also gaining enhanced infectivity. Cooling towers have been the source of outbreaks of Legionnaires’ disease in the past and are thus usually screened for legionellae on a routine basis, not considering, however, FLA and their vehicle function. The aim of this study was to incorporate a screening system for host amoebae into a Legionella routine screening. A new real-time PCR-based screening system for various groups of FLA was established. Three cooling towers were screened every 2 weeks over the period of 1 year for FLA and Legionella spp., by culture and molecular methods in parallel. Altogether, 83.3 % of the cooling tower samples were positive for FLA, Acanthamoeba being the dominating genus. Interestingly, 69.7 % of the cooling tower samples were not suitable for the standard Legionella screening due to their high organic burden. In the remaining samples, positivity for Legionella spp. was 25 % by culture, but overall positivity was 50 % by molecular methods. Several amoebal isolates revealed intracellular bacteria. © 2016 The Author(s)


Grunberger B.,University of Vienna | Grunberger B.,Institute For Veterinarmedizinische Untersuchungen | Schleicher C.,AGES | Stuger H.P.,AGES | And 4 more authors.
Tierarztliche Praxis Ausgabe G: Grosstiere - Nutztiere | Year: 2015

Objective:The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) worldwide causes important economic losses in pig production. Its causative agent, the PRRS virus (PRRSV), is one of the most frequently detected infectious agents in relation to respiratory diseases in pigs in Austria. We investigated the correlation between the PRRSV status of pig farms, determined by detection of PRRSV antibodies in the serum of slaughter pigs, and the prevalence of pathological-anatomical lung lesions in slaughter pigs of the respective farms. Material and methods: Between December 1, 2011 and April 16, 2012, a total of 1056 serum samples of slaughter pigs from 66 pig farms were collected at an Austrian abattoir. The presence of PRRSV antibodies was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in each sample and the PRRSV status of the respective farms was determined. No PRRSV vaccination was performed on any of the farms. In addition, the pathological-anatomical lung lesions of all slaughter pigs of the 66 farms that were slaughtered between September 1, 2011 and December 11, 2012 were recorded by authorized veterinarians at the abattoir. The prevalence of lung lesions and pleuritis in PRRSV-positive and unsuspected farms was compared and statistically interpreted. Results: Slaughter pigs of PRRSV positive farms had a significantly higher prevalence of severe lung lesions and pleuritis visceralis and parietalis than slaughter pigs of PRRSV unsuspected farms. Pigs of combined farms (nursery and fattening unit at the same location) displayed a tendency for more moderate and severe lung lesions than pigs of exclusive fattening farms. Conclusions and clinical relevance: In the present study, the PRRSV status of pig farms displayed a significant influence on the prevalence of lung lesions in the slaughter pigs. Findings untypical for PRRS, including pleuritis, were also found significantly more often on those farms. This leads to the conclusion that other primary and/or secondary infections are involved, which can be exacerbated by the immunosuppressive effect of the PRRSV. There was a tendency for combined farms to be more severely affected than fattening farms. © Schattauer 2015.


Gollner G.,University of Vienna | Gabler C.,University of Vienna | Grausgruber-Groger S.,AGES | Friedel J.K.,University of Vienna | And 2 more authors.
Journal fur Kulturpflanzen | Year: 2010

The grain legumes lens (Lens culinaris), grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) and field pea (Pisum sativum) were examined as pure crops and in different mixing ratios with false flax (Camelina sativa) on organically cultivated fields of the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, in the Pannonian region in three consecutive vegetation periods. The aim of this study was to test whether a mixed stand of grain legume and false flax shows advantages compared to the pure crops despite an increased competition between the partners in the mixture under the dry conditions. Therefore, the optimum seed density for the partners in the mixed stand under the Pannonian conditions was identified. The weather conditions varied widely within the three vegetation periods and influenced the yield of the mixtures. Under the favourable weather conditions in the first experimental year, the mixed stands of lens-false flax and grass pea-false flax showed benefits in yield. On average across three very different years, a mixture of false flax: lens at 25:75 percent had the most positive mixture cropping effect. An average of 0.6 t ha -1 false flax was achieved in mixed stands with lentils and in mixtures with grass pea and field pea with high false flax percentage. In general, the positive effect of the substitutive lens-false flax and grass pea-false flax mixed stands was higher in the favourable, wet years than the negative effect in the unfavourable, dry year. We therefore recommend these grain legume-false flax mixed stands for the dry regions in Eastern Austria and for climatically similar regions in Hungary or Central Germany.


PubMed | University of Vienna, AGES and Medical University of Vienna
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Parasitology research | Year: 2016

Free-living amoebae (FLA) are widely spread in the environment and known to cause rare but often serious infections. Besides this, FLA may serve as vehicles for bacterial pathogens. In particular, Legionella pneumophila is known to replicate within FLA thereby also gaining enhanced infectivity. Cooling towers have been the source of outbreaks of Legionnaires disease in the past and are thus usually screened for legionellae on a routine basis, not considering, however, FLA and their vehicle function. The aim of this study was to incorporate a screening system for host amoebae into a Legionella routine screening. A new real-time PCR-based screening system for various groups of FLA was established. Three cooling towers were screened every 2weeks over the period of 1year for FLA and Legionella spp., by culture and molecular methods in parallel. Altogether, 83.3% of the cooling tower samples were positive for FLA, Acanthamoeba being the dominating genus. Interestingly, 69.7 % of the cooling tower samples were not suitable for the standard Legionella screening due to their high organic burden. In the remaining samples, positivity for Legionella spp. was 25% by culture, but overall positivity was 50% by molecular methods. Several amoebal isolates revealed intracellular bacteria.

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