The Agency for Marine and Fisheries Research

Bali, Indonesia

The Agency for Marine and Fisheries Research

Bali, Indonesia
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Proisy C.,Montpellier University | Proisy C.,French Institute of Pondicherry | Viennois G.,Montpellier University | Sidik F.,The Agency for Marine and Fisheries Research | And 16 more authors.
Marine Pollution Bulletin | Year: 2017

Revegetation of abandoned aquaculture regions should be a priority for any integrated coastal zone management (ICZM). This paper examines the potential of a matchless time series of 20 very high spatial resolution (VHSR) optical satellite images acquired for mapping trends in the evolution of mangrove forests from 2001 to 2015 in an estuary fragmented into aquaculture ponds. Evolution of mangrove extent was quantified through robust multitemporal analysis based on supervised image classification. Results indicated that mangroves are expanding inside and outside ponds and over pond dykes. However, the yearly expansion rate of vegetation cover greatly varied between replanted ponds. Ground truthing showed that only Rhizophora species had been planted, whereas natural mangroves consist of Avicennia and Sonneratia species. In addition, the dense Rhizophora plantations present very low regeneration capabilities compared with natural mangroves. Time series of VHSR images provide comprehensive and intuitive level of information for the support of ICZM. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.


Sidik F.,University of Queensland | Sidik F.,The Agency for Marine and Fisheries Research | Neil D.,University of Queensland | Lovelock C.E.,University of Queensland
Marine Pollution Bulletin | Year: 2016

Large quantities of mud from the LUSI (Lumpur Sidoarjo) volcano in northeastern Java have been channeled to the sea causing high rates of sediment delivery to the mouth of the Porong River, which has a cover of natural and planted mangroves. This study investigated how the high rates of sediment delivery affected vertical accretion, surface elevation change and the growth of Avicennia sp., the dominant mangrove species in the region. During our observations in 2010-2011 (4-5years after the initial volcanic eruption), very high rates of sedimentation in the forests at the mouth of the river gave rise to high vertical accretion of over 10cmy-1. The high sedimentation rates not only resulted in reduced growth of Avicennia sp. mangrove trees at the two study sites at the Porong River mouth, but also gave rise to high soil surface elevation gains. © 2016.

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