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— The report “Frontier Pharma: Fatty Liver Disease Pipeline Market - High Degree of First-in-Class Innovation, Dominated by Nuclear Receptor-Targeting NASH Products” helps to understand the current clinical and commercial landscapes by considering disease pathogenesis, etiology, epidemiology, symptoms, co-morbidities and complications, and treatment options and algorithms. Browse the Fatty Liver Disease Pipeline Market 2017 Report of 76 Pages, 58 Tables and Figures, and 10 Companies Available at http://www.reportsnreports.com/contacts/discount.aspx?name=974419. Fatty liver disease (FLD) Market comprises a spectrum of chronic liver disorders characterized by excessive lipid accumulation in the liver (steatosis), which may lead to inflammation (steatohepatitis) and fibrosis. It has the potential to progress to end-stage liver diseases such as cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure. It is also associated with numerous complications and co-morbidities, including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. FLD can be divided into non-alcoholic FLD (NAFLD) and alcoholic FLD (AFLD), depending on the history of alcohol use. Both can also be divided into two subgroups: steatosis and steatohepatitis. This Report Covered Below Points • Provides the composition of the FLD market in terms of dominant classes of therapies. Key unmet needs are identified to allow a competitive understanding of gaps in the market. • Allows recognizing innovative pipeline trends by analyzing therapies by stage of development, molecule type and molecular target. • Assess the therapeutic potential of first-in-class targets. Using a proprietary matrix tailored to FLD, all first-in-class targets in the pipeline have been assessed and ranked according to clinical potential. Promising early-stage targets have been further reviewed in greater detail. Place Order to This Report at http://www.reportsnreports.com/purchase.aspx?name=974419. Companies mentioned in this report: Novartis, Celgene, NGM Biopharmaceuticals, Raptor Pharmaceuticals, chemomAb, Conatus Pharmaceuticals, BLR Bio. Scope of the Report FLD comprises a diverse patient population with significant unmet needs The FLD pipeline is relatively large and has a high degree of first-in-class innovation The FLD deal landscape shows rising deal volumes and considerable investment opportunities List of Tables Table 1: Fatty Liver Disease Therapeutics Market, Survival Rates of Simple Steatosis and NASH/ASH, 2017 Table 2: Fatty Liver Disease Therapeutics Market, Global, Key Features and Pipeline Activity of Connective Tissue Growth Factor, 2017 Table 3: Fatty Liver Disease Therapeutics Market, Global, Pipeline Programs Targeting Connective Tissue Growth Factor, 2017 Table 4: Fatty Liver Disease Therapeutics Market, Global, Key Features and Pipeline Activity of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1, 2017 Table 5: Fatty Liver Disease Therapeutics Market, Global, Key Features and Pipeline Activity of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 2, 2017 And More… List of Figures Figure 1: Fatty Liver Disease Therapeutics Market, US, Innovation Trends in Product Approvals, Number of Product Approvals by FDA and Five-Year Moving Average of Product Approvals, 1987-2014 Figure 2: Fatty Liver Disease Therapeutics Market, Sales Performance of First-in-Class and Non-First-in-Class Products Post Marketing Approval ($m), 2006-2013 Figure 3: Fatty Liver Disease Therapeutics Market, Global, Overall Pharmaceutical Industry Pipeline by Therapy Area, 2017 Figure 4: Fatty Liver Disease Therapeutics Market, Global, Pipeline by Stage of Development and Molecule Type, 2017 And More… In Depth Table of Content for Frontier Pharma: Fatty Liver Disease - High Degree of First-in-Class Innovation, Dominated by Nuclear Receptor-Targeting NASH Products About Us: ReportsnReports.com is your single source for all market research needs. Our database includes 500,000+ market research reports from over 95 leading global publishers & in-depth market research studies of over 5000 micro markets. With comprehensive information about the publishers and the industries for which they publish market research reports, we help you in your purchase decision by mapping your information needs with our huge collection of reports. For more information, please visit http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/974419-frontier-pharma-fatty-liver-disease-high-degree-of-first-in-class-innovation-dominated-by-nuclear-receptor-targeting-nash-products.html


— Fatty liver disease (FLD) comprises a spectrum of chronic liver disorders characterized by excessive lipid accumulation in the liver (steatosis), which may lead to inflammation (steatohepatitis) and fibrosis. It has the potential to progress to end-stage liver diseases such as cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure, and is also associated with numerous complications and co-morbidities, including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. FLD can be divided into non-alcoholic FLD (NAFLD) and alcoholic FLD (AFLD), depending on the patent’s history of alcohol use. Reasons to buy This report will allow you to - - Appreciate the current clinical and commercial landscapes by considering disease pathogenesis, etiology, epidemiology, symptoms, co-morbidities and complications, and treatment options and algorithms. - Visualize the composition of the FLD market in terms of dominant classes of therapies. Key unmet needs are identified to allow a competitive understanding of gaps in the market. - Recognize innovative pipeline trends by analyzing therapies by stage of development, molecule type and molecular target. - Assess the therapeutic potential of first-in-class targets. Using a proprietary matrix tailored to FLD, all first-in-class targets in the pipeline have been assessed and ranked according to clinical potential. Promising early-stage targets have been further reviewed in greater detail. - Consider first-in-class pipeline products with no prior involvement in licensing and co-development deals that may represent potential investment opportunities." FLD is the most common chronic liver disease in the world, and its global prevalence has increased rapidly in the past several decades. The worldwide prevalence of FLD is estimated at 20-45% in the general population, and up to 90% in obese patients. There is a broad consensus to describe the condition as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and it is closely associated with obesity, diabetes and dyslipidemia. NAFLD has become the main driver of the rapid growth of FLD prevalence, mainly due to the rising prevalence of obesity. FLD is increasingly recognized as a major global health problem. However, despite this the FLD market is still in its infancy, with no FDA-approved drugs for this indication, and only a limited number of generic drugs approved in non-US markets in recent years. Scope FLD comprises a diverse patient population with significant unmet needs - What is the pathophysiology of FLD? - What are the common co-morbidities and complications? - What are the most significant unmet needs within the market? The FLD pipeline is relatively large and has a high degree of first-in-class innovation - Which molecule types and molecular targets are most prominent within the pipeline? - Which first-in-class targets are most promising? - How does the ratio of first-in-class targets to first-in-class products differ by stage of development and molecular target class? The FLD deal landscape shows rising deal volumes and considerable investment opportunities - Do FLD products attract high deal values? - Which molecule types and molecular targets dominate the deals landscape? - Which first-in-class pipeline products have no prior involvement in licensing or co-development deals? Due to the increasing health burden of FLD and the lack of therapeutic options, there is a pressing need to develop pharmacological strategies. This is especially the case for patients with steatohepatitis, who are at the greatest risk of developing cirrhosis or liver cancer, which can lead to liver failure. Due to the pathophysiological complexity of FLD and its diverse population, different therapeutic agents are likely to be needed to tackle the lipotoxicity, inflammation and fibrogenesis that drive FLD progression. FLD has an active pipeline and first-in-class products account for a considerable proportion, which is very promising considering the level of unmet need and lack of approved treatment options. First-in-class innovation is concentrated heavily at the early drug development stages, and prominent first-in-class molecular targets include nuclear receptors, immune mediators, and molecules involved in lipid synthesis. Additionally, the first-in-class targets identified show considerable diversity, reflecting the multifaceted aspects of FLD pathophysiology. Read the more detail of this report @ http://www.orbisresearch.com/reports/index/frontier-pharma-fatty-liver-disease-high-degree-of-first-in-class-innovation-dominated-by-nuclear-receptor-targeting-nash-products. About Us: Orbis Research (orbisresearch.com) is a single point aid for all your market research requirements. We have vast database of reports from the leading publishers and authors across the globe. We specialize in delivering customized reports as per the requirements of our clients. We have complete information about our publishers and hence are sure about the accuracy of the industries and verticals of their specialization. This helps our clients to map their needs and we produce the perfect required market research study for our clients. For more information, please visit http://www.orbisresearch.com/reports/index/frontier-pharma-fatty-liver-disease-high-degree-of-first-in-class-innovation-dominated-by-nuclear-receptor-targeting-nash-products


The report "Frontier Pharma: Fatty Liver Disease - High Degree of First-in-Class Innovation, Dominated by Nuclear Receptor-Targeting NASH Products" helps to understand the current clinical and commercial landscapes by considering disease pathogenesis, etiology, epidemiology, symptoms, co-morbidities and complications, and treatment options and algorithms. The FLD pipeline is relatively large, with 173 products in active development, which constitutes almost one fifth of the pipeline for the gastrointestinal therapy area. Many pipeline products for FLD are also in development for other non-hepatic fibrotic diseases or indications from the metabolic disorders therapy area - such as diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia - reflecting the similarities in the underlying pathophysiology of these indications. Strategic consolidation activity levels are relatively low in the FLD market, as reflected in the low number of licensing and co-development deals completed since 2006. Analysis of licensing and co-development deals relating to FLD therapeutics since 2006 has identified aggregate deal values of $778m and $1.8 billion, respectively. Due to the increasing prevalence and the health burden of FLD, and the lack of therapeutic options, there is a high need to develop pharmacological strategies. This is especially the case for patients with steatohepatitis who are at the greatest risk of developing cirrhosis or liver cancer that can lead to liver failure. Due to the pathophysiological complexity of FLD and its diverse population, different therapeutic agents are likely to be needed in order to tackle the lipotoxic, inflammatory and fibrogenic effects seen in FLD. 2 Executive Summary 2.1 Urgent Unmet Need Driven By Rising Prevalence 2.2 High Degree of First-in-Class Innovation 2.3 Rising Deal Volumes and Considerable Investment Opportunities in First-in-Class Product Development 3 The Case for Innovation 3.1 Growing Opportunities for Biologic Products 3.2 Diversification of Molecular Targets 3.3 Innovative First-in-Class Development Remains Attractive 3.4 Regulatory and Reimbursement Policy Shifts Favor First-in-Class Product Innovation 3.5 Sustained Innovation 3.6 Research Report Guidance 4 Clinical and Commercial Landscape 4.1 Disease Overview 4.2 Disease Symptoms 4.3 Epidemiology 4.4 Etiology and Risk Factors 4.4.1 Environmental Factors 4.4.2 Host Factors 4.5 Pathophysiology 4.5.1 Steatosis 4.5.2 Hepatocellular Injury and Inflammation 4.5.3 Fibrosis 4.5.4 Conclusion 4.6 Co-morbidities and Complications 4.7 Diagnosis 4.7.1 Diagnosis of Fatty Liver Disease 4.7.2 Disease Prognosis 4.8 Treatment 4.8.1 Lifestyle Intervention 4.8.2 Pharmacological Treatment 4.8.3 Liver Transplantation 5 Assessment of Pipeline Product Innovation 5.1 Pipeline by Stage of Development, Molecule Type and Molecular Target 5.2 First-in-Class Programs Targeting Novel Molecular Targets 5.3 ASH 5.4 AFLD 5.5 Steatohepatitis (unspecified) 5.6 FLD (unspecified) 5.7 Table of All Pipeline Products 6 Signaling Network, Disease Causation and Innovation Alignment 6.1 Complexity of Signaling Networks in FLD 6.2 Signaling Pathways and First-in-Class Molecular Target Integration 6.3 First-in-Class Matrix Assessment 7 First-in-Class Target Evaluation 7.1 Pipeline Programs Targeting Connective Tissue Growth Factor 7.2 Pipeline Programs Targeting Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1 and 2 7.3 Pipeline Programs Targeting Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 and 2 7.4 Pipeline Programs Targeting Galectin 3 7.5 Pipeline Programs Targeting Cathepsin B 7.6 Pipeline Programs Targeting NACHT, KKR and PYD Domains-Containing Protein 3 7.7 Pipeline Programs Targeting P2Y Purinoceptor 13 7.8 Pipeline Programs Targeting Serpin H1 7.9 Conclusion 8 Strategic Consolidations 8.1 Industry-Wide First-in-Class Deals 8.2 Licensing Deals 8.2.1 Deals by Region, Value and Year 8.2.2 Deals by Stage of Development and Value 8.2.3 Deals by Molecule Type, Molecular Target and Value 8.2.4 List of Deals with Disclosed Deal Values 8.3 Codevelopment Deals 8.3.1 Deals by Region, Value and Year 8.3.2 Deals by Stage of Development and Value 8.3.3 Deals by Molecule Type, Molecular Target and Value 8.3.4 List of Deals with Disclosed Deal Values 8.4 First-in-Class Programs with and without Prior Involvement in Licensing and Co-development Deals For more information about this drug pipelines report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/bms2zh/frontier_pharma To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-fattyliver-disease-market-2017-rising-deal-volumes-and-considerable-investment-opportunities-in-first-in-class-product-development---research-and-markets-300452265.html


PubMed | University Grenoble Alpes, AFLD., Institute Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees, French Institute of Health and Medical Research and IRBA.
Type: | Journal: Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) | Year: 2016

We investigated the effects of chronic hypoxia on the maximal use of and sensitivity of mitochondrial to different substrates in rat slow-oxidative (soleus, SOL) and fast-glycolytic (extensor digitorum longus, EDL) muscles. We studied mitochondrial respiration in situ in permeabilized myofibers, using pyruvate, octanoate, palmitoyl-carnitine (PC) or palmitoyl-coenzyme A (PCoA). The hypophagia induced by hypoxia may also alter metabolism. We therefore used a group of pair-fed rats (reproducing the same caloric restriction as observed in hypoxic animals) in addition to the normoxic control fed ad libitum. The resting respiratory exchange ratio decreased after 21 days of exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (simulated elevation of 5,500 m). The respiration of pyruvate and octanoate were unaffected. By contrast, the maximal oxidative respiratory rate for PCoA, the transport of which depends on CPT-1, decreased in the rapid-glycolytic EDL and increased in the slow-oxidative SOL, although hypoxia improved affinity for this substrate in both muscle types. PC and PCoA were oxidized similarly in normoxic EDL, whereas chronic hypoxia limited transport at the CPT-1 step in this muscle. The effects of hypoxia were mediated by caloric restriction in the SOL, and by hypoxia itself in the EDL. We conclude that improvements in mitochondrial affinity for PCoA, a physiological long-chain fatty acid, would facilitate fatty-acid use at rest after chronic hypoxia independently of quantitative alterations of mitochondria. Conversely, decreasing the maximal oxidation of PCoA in fast-glycolytic muscles would limit fatty-acid use during exercise.


Labsy Z.,University Paris - Sud | Prieur F.,University Paris - Sud | Le Panse B.,University Paris - Sud | Do M.-C.,University Paris - Sud | And 3 more authors.
Stress | Year: 2013

Diurnal patterns of cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion, the two main peripheral secretory products of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal neuroendocrine stress axis, have been well characterized in rest conditions but not in relation to physical exercise. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to determine the effects of an intense 90-min aerobic exercise on the waking diurnal cortisol and DHEA cycles on three separate days [without exercise, with morning exercise (10:00-11:30 h), and with afternoon exercise (14:00-15:30 h)] in nine recreationally trained soccer players. Saliva samples were collected at awakening, 30 min after awakening, and then every 2 h from 08:00 to 22:00 h. A burst of secretory activity was found for cortisol (p < 0.01) but not for DHEA after awakening. Overall, diurnal decline for both adrenal steroids was observed on resting and exercise days under all conditions. However, there was a significant increase in salivary cortisol concentrations on the morning-exercise and afternoon-exercise days at, respectively, 12:00 h (p < 0.05) and 16:00 h (p < 0.01), versus the other trials. This acute response to exercise was not evident for DHEA. The results of this investigation indicate that 90 min of intense aerobic exercise does not affect the circadian pattern of salivary adrenal steroids in recreationally trained athletes over a 16-h waking period, despite a transitory increase in post-exercise cortisol concentration. Further studies are necessary to determine whether these results are applicable to elite athletes or patients with cortisol or DHEA deficiency. © Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Le Panse B.,University Paris - Sud | Labsy Z.,University Paris - Sud | Baillot A.,University Paris - Sud | Vibarel-Rebot N.,University Paris - Sud | And 4 more authors.
Steroids | Year: 2012

The purpose of this study was to assess changes in the steroid hormone levels of elite athletes during an international powerlifting competition. Baseline cortisol, DHEA and testosterone were determined in saliva samples in 19 (8 men, 11 women) junior and sub-junior athletes on the day before competition, and then on the competition day during the official weighing and in the hour after competition. Performance was determined by total output and the Wilks formula. No change in saliva steroid concentrations was observed between samples collected on the day before competition and the weighing samples. There was no gender effect on cortisol concentrations but saliva testosterone levels were always significantly higher in men than in women (p < 0.01), as was end-competition DHEA (p < 0.05). Cortisol and DHEA were significantly increased in male and female athletes after the competition (respectively, p < 0.01 and p < 0.05), whereas end-competition testosterone concentrations were only significantly increased in men (p < 0.01). Significant relationships were demonstrated between performance and end-competition cortisol levels in women and end-competition testosterone levels in men. These data indicate that workouts during an international powerlifting competition produce a significant increase in adrenal steroid hormones in both genders, with an increase in male gonadal steroid hormone. Further studies are necessary to examine the changes in oestradiol and progesterone in women and their potential impact on performance during international powerlifting competition. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Vibarel-Rebot N.,University Paris - Sud | Rieth N.,University Paris - Sud | Lasne F.,AFLD | Jaffre C.,University of Rennes 2 – Upper Brittany | Collomp K.,University Paris - Sud
Contraception | Year: 2015

Background The impact of oral contraceptives (OCs) on the saliva diurnal pattern of metabolic steroid hormones remained unknown. Study design Saliva samples were taken from young healthy women (11 OC users, 10 non-OC users) to analyze cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and testosterone 4 times (days 1, 8, 15 and 22) over one menstrual cycle. Results OC use decreased saliva testosterone concentrations (p<.01) under all conditions of day and time, but not saliva cortisol. OC also decreased saliva DHEA concentrations during the first part of the day (p<.05), with a dampened amplitude in its diurnal pattern. Conclusion The clinical relevance requires further study. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Zorgati H.,University Paris - Sud | Prieur F.,University Paris - Sud | Vergniaud T.,University Paris - Sud | Cottin F.,University Paris - Sud | And 6 more authors.
Steroids | Year: 2014

All systemically administered glucocorticoids (GC) are prohibited in-competition, because of the potential ergogenic effects. Although short-term GC intake has been shown to improve performance during submaximal exercise, literature on its impact during brief intense exercise appears to be very scant. The purpose of this study was to examine the ergogenic and metabolic effects of prednisone during repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise. In a double-blind randomized protocol, ten recreational male athletes followed two 1-week treatments (Cor: prednisone, 60 mg/day or Pla: placebo). At the end of each treatment, they hopped on their dominant leg for 30 s three times consecutively and then hopped until exhaustion, with intervals of 5 min of passive recovery. Blood and saliva samples were collected at rest and 3 min after each exercise bout to determine the lactate, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, TNF-alpha, DHEA and testosterone values. The absolute peak force of the dominant leg was significantly increased by Cor but only during the first 30-s hopping bout (p < 0.05), whereas time to exhaustion was not significantly changed after Cor treatment vs Pla (Pla: 119.9 ± 24.7; Cor: 123.1 ± 29.5 s). Cor intake lowered basal and end-exercise plasma interleukin-6 and saliva DHEA (p < 0.01) and increased interleukin-10 (p < 0.01), whereas no significant change was found in blood lactate and TNF-alpha or saliva testosterone between Pla and Cor. According to these data, short-term glucocorticoid intake did not improve endurance performance during repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise, despite the significant initial increase in absolute peak force and anti-inflammatory effect. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Le Panse B.,University of Orléans | Vibarel-Rebot N.,University of Orléans | Parage G.,International Powerlifting Federation | Albrings D.,International Powerlifting Federation | And 3 more authors.
Stress | Year: 2010

The purpose of this study was to examine salivary cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and testosterone responses to the bench press in an international powerlifting competition and to determine whether these salivary hormone concentrations could be used to predict performance. Twenty-six elite athletes (13 females and 13 males) provided saliva samples during the official weighing-in and after the last attempt at the bench press, as well as at baseline on a non-competition day. Performance index was determined with the Wilks formula, which adjusts powerlifting scores according to body mass. Salivary cortisol concentrations were significantly increased in all subjects after the bench press (p < 0.01), whereas DHEA concentrations were significantly increased in women (p < 0.01) but not in men after the bench press. No significant change in testosterone concentrations was observed during the experiment in either men or women, which resulted in a marked decrease in the testosterone/cortisol ratio. The performance index showed no significant correlation with any of the hormone responses to competition. In conclusion, despite the increase in stress adrenocortical hormone responses to an international powerlifting competition, these hormone concentrations alone are not predictors of bench press performance in elite powerlifting athletes. © 2010 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Guimard A.,University of Orléans | Prieur F.,University of Orléans | Zorgati H.,University of Orléans | Morin D.,University of Orléans | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2014

Guimard, A, Prieur, F, Zorgati, H, Morin, D, Lasne, F, and Collomp, K. Acute apnea swimming: Metabolic responses and performance. J Strength Cond Res 28(4): 958-963, 2014- Competitive swimmers regularly perform apnea series with or without fins as part of their training, but the ergogenic and metabolic repercussions of acute and chronic apnea have not been examined. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the cardiovascular, lactate, arterial oxygen saturation and hormonal responses to acute apnea in relation to performance in male swimmers. According to a randomized protocol, 15 national or regional competitive swimmers were monitored while performing four 100-m freestyle trials, each consisting of four 25-m segments with departure every 30 seconds at maximal speed in the following conditions: with normal frequency breathing with fins (F) and without fins (S) and with complete apnea for the four 25-m segments with (FAp) and without fins (SAp). Heart rate (HR) was measured continuously and arterial oxygen saturation, blood, and saliva samples were assessed after 30 seconds, 3 minutes, and 10 minutes of recovery, respectively. Swimming performance was better with fins than without both with normal frequency breathing and apnea (p < 0.001). Apnea induced no change in lactatemia, but a decrease in arterial oxygen saturation in both SAp and FAp (p < 0.001) was noted and a decrease in HR and swimming performance in SAp (p < 0.01). During apnea without fins, performance alteration was correlated with bradycardia (r = 0.63) and arterial oxygen desaturation (r = -0.57). Saliva dehydroepiandrosterone was increased compared with basal values whatever the trial (p ≤ 0.05), whereas no change was found in saliva cortisol or testosterone. Further studies are necessary to clarify the fin effect on HR and performance during apnea swimming. © 2014 National Strength and Conditioning Association.

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