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Zhang J.,Peking University | Zhou S.,Peking University | Zhou Y.,Peking University | Feng F.,Peking University | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Liver damage caused by radiotherapy is associated with a high mortality rate, but no established treatment exists. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) are capable of migration to injured tissue sites, where they aid in the repair of the damage. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is critical for damage repair due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-fibrotic and cell regeneration-promoting effects. This study was performed to investigate the therapeutic effects of HGF-overexpressing ADSCs on radiation-induced liver damage (RILD). ADSCs were infected with a lentivirus encoding HGF and HGF-shRNA. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats received 60Gy of irradiation to induce liver injury and were immediately given either saline, ADSCs, ADSCs + HGF or ADSCs + shHGF. Two days after irradiation, a significant reduction in apoptosis was observed in the HGF-overexpressing ADSC group compared with the RILD group, as assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Scanning electron microscopy showed chromatin condensation after irradiation, which was ameliorated in the group that received ADSCs and was reversed in the group that received HGF-overexpressing ADSCs. HGF-overexpressing ADSCs ameliorated radiation- induced liver fibrosis through down regulation of a-SMA and fibronectin. Hepatocyte regeneration was significantly improved in rats treated with ADSCs compared with rats from the RILD group), as assessed by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Rats that received HGF-overexpressing ADSCs showed an even greater level of hepatocyte regeneration. HGF-overexpressing ADSCs completely blocked the radiation-induced increase in the enzymes ALT and AST. The effect of mitigating RILD was compromised in the ADSC + shHGF group compared with the ADSC group. Altogether, these results suggest that HGFoverexpressing ADSCs can significantly improve RILD in a rat model, which may serve as a valuable therapeutic alternative. © 2014 Zhang et al.


Zhang J.,Peking University | Zhou S.,Peking University | Zhou Y.,Peking University | Feng F.,Peking University | And 8 more authors.
Cell Transplantation | Year: 2016

Substantial damage to the bone marrow can be caused by exposure to radiation, which can then develop into severe thrombocytopenia. In this study, we investigated the in vivo impact of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) on megakaryopoiesis and platelet recovery in irradiated mice. Radiation markedly reduced peripheral blood counts. Recovery of both platelets and WBCs was better in the ADSC-treated group compared with the saline group and the fibroblast group 21 days after irradiation. A significant increase in the total CFU and MK-CFU after irradiation was observed in the ADSC group compared with the saline group and the fibroblast group. Further, the proportion of CD41+ cells in the ADSC group was significantly higher than that in the saline group and the fibroblast group. ADSC treatment significantly improved the cellularity and decreased the apoptotic cells in the bone marrow while normal fibroblasts did not. Administration of ADSCs upregulated protein expression of phosphorylated Akt and Bcl-xL, whereas the expression of Bax, a protein related to apoptosis, was significantly lower in the ADSC group. In conclusion, this study suggests that ADSCs were capable of promoting platelet recovery, improving megakaryopoiesis, and inhibiting apoptosis of bone marrow cells in irradiated mice. The antiapoptotic effect of ADSCs is likely to be mediated via the PI3K/Akt pathway. These findings may provide a scientific basis for using ADSCs as a new therapy after irradiation. © 2016 Cognizant, LLC.


PubMed | Peking University and Affiliated Hospital to the Academy of Military Medicine Science
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

Liver damage caused by radiotherapy is associated with a high mortality rate, but no established treatment exists. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) are capable of migration to injured tissue sites, where they aid in the repair of the damage. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is critical for damage repair due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-fibrotic and cell regeneration-promoting effects. This study was performed to investigate the therapeutic effects of HGF-overexpressing ADSCs on radiation-induced liver damage (RILD). ADSCs were infected with a lentivirus encoding HGF and HGF-shRNA. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats received 60Gy of irradiation to induce liver injury and were immediately given either saline, ADSCs, ADSCs + HGF or ADSCs + shHGF. Two days after irradiation, a significant reduction in apoptosis was observed in the HGF-overexpressing ADSC group compared with the RILD group, as assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Scanning electron microscopy showed chromatin condensation after irradiation, which was ameliorated in the group that received ADSCs and was reversed in the group that received HGF-overexpressing ADSCs. HGF-overexpressing ADSCs ameliorated radiation- induced liver fibrosis through down regulation of -SMA and fibronectin. Hepatocyte regeneration was significantly improved in rats treated with ADSCs compared with rats from the RILD group), as assessed by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Rats that received HGF-overexpressing ADSCs showed an even greater level of hepatocyte regeneration. HGF-overexpressing ADSCs completely blocked the radiation-induced increase in the enzymes ALT and AST. The effect of mitigating RILD was compromised in the ADSC + shHGF group compared with the ADSC group. Altogether, these results suggest that HGF-overexpressing ADSCs can significantly improve RILD in a rat model, which may serve as a valuable therapeutic alternative.


Zhao H.,Affiliated Hospital to the Academy of Military Medicine Science | Guo M.,Affiliated Hospital to the Academy of Military Medicine Science | Sun X.,Affiliated Hospital to the Academy of Military Medicine Science | Sun W.,Second Artillery General Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Radiation Research | Year: 2013

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is one of the most critical cytokines used for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). In addition to the hematopoietic effects of G-CSF on the differentiation and proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells, G-CSF is also known to have immunomodulatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether G-CSF could accelerate central and peripheral T lymphocyte recovery after a sublethal dose of irradiation. Female BALB/c mice were subjected to 6 Gy of total body irradiation and then were treated with either 100 mg/kg G-CSF or an equal volume of PBS once daily for 14 days. Percentages of thymocyte subpopulations including CD4 - CD8 -, CD4 + CD8 +, CD4 + CD8- and CD4 - CD8+ T cells, peripheral CD3 +, CD4+ and CD8+ cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific to the 257-bp T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs). The proliferative capacity of splenic mononuclear cells upon exposure to ConA was measured by using the Cell Count Kit-8 (CCK-8). G-CSF treatment promoted thymocyte regeneration, accelerated the recovery of CD4 + CD8+ cells and increased the frequency of thymocyte sjTRECs. These effects were more prominent at early time points (Day 28) after irradiation. G-CSF also increased the rate of recovery of peripheral CD3 +, CD4+ and CD8+ cells and shortened the period of severe lymphopenia following irradiation. G-CSF also increased the splenic mononuclear cell mitotic responsiveness to ConA more than control-treated cells. Our results show that G-CSF accelerates T cell recovery through both thymic-dependent and thymic-independent pathways, which could be used to increase the rate of immune reconstitution after sublethal irradiation. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.


Wei L.,General Hospital of Tibet Military Region | Zuo H.,Affiliated Hospital to the Academy of Military Medicine Science | Sun X.,Affiliated Hospital to the Academy of Military Medicine Science | Liu T.,Affiliated Hospital to the Academy of Military Medicine Science | And 9 more authors.
Clinical Transplantation | Year: 2011

This study was performed to assay whether leukemia-associated antigen (LAA)-specific CTLs of recipient origin existed in the blood of patients who achieved full donor chimerism (FDC) soon after nonmyeloablative transplantation (NST). In 15 patients who received haplo-identical NST, WT1 +CD8 +CTLs were detected with WT1/HLA-A*0201 pentamer, and the donor-recipient chimerism levels were analyzed by three methods. Results showed that WT1 +CD8 +CTLs could be detected in patients with HLA-A*00201 expressing only in recipient, and cells of recipient origin existed in the blood of patients who achieved FDC, which suggested that LAA-specific CTLs of recipient origin may exist in patients achieving FDC soon after NST. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


PubMed | Affiliated Hospital to the Academy of Military Medicine Science
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of radiation research | Year: 2013

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is one of the most critical cytokines used for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). In addition to the hematopoietic effects of G-CSF on the differentiation and proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells, G-CSF is also known to have immunomodulatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether G-CSF could accelerate central and peripheral T lymphocyte recovery after a sublethal dose of irradiation. Female BALB/c mice were subjected to 6 Gy of total body irradiation and then were treated with either 100 g/kg G-CSF or an equal volume of PBS once daily for 14 days. Percentages of thymocyte subpopulations including CD4 - CD8 - , CD4 + CD8 + , CD4 + CD8- and CD4 - CD8+ T cells, peripheral CD3 + , CD4+ and CD8+ cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific to the 257-bp T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs). The proliferative capacity of splenic mononuclear cells upon exposure to ConA was measured by using the Cell Count Kit-8 (CCK-8). G-CSF treatment promoted thymocyte regeneration, accelerated the recovery of CD4 + CD8+ cells and increased the frequency of thymocyte sjTRECs. These effects were more prominent at early time points (Day 28) after irradiation. G-CSF also increased the rate of recovery of peripheral CD3 + , CD4+ and CD8+ cells and shortened the period of severe lymphopenia following irradiation. G-CSF also increased the splenic mononuclear cell mitotic responsiveness to ConA more than control-treated cells. Our results show that G-CSF accelerates T cell recovery through both thymic-dependent and thymic-independent pathways, which could be used to increase the rate of immune reconstitution after sublethal irradiation.

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