Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Institute for Population and Family Planning

Chongqing, China

Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Institute for Population and Family Planning

Chongqing, China
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Xu W.,Chinese Institute of Urban Environment | Bao H.,Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Institute for Population and Family Planning | Liu F.,Chinese Institute of Urban Environment | Liu L.,Chinese Institute of Urban Environment | And 7 more authors.
Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source | Year: 2012

Background: Recent observations in in vitro and in vivo models suggest that arsenic (As) is an endocrine disruptor at environmentally-relevant levels. When exposed to As, male rats and mice show steroidogenic dysfunction that can lead to infertility. However, the possible effects of As on human male semen quality remain obscure. Methods: We monitored the profile of As species in the urine of a reproductive-age human cohort and assessed its association with semen quality. Men (n = 96) were recruited in an infertility clinic from July 2009 to August 2010 in the Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Institute for Population and Family Planning. Five urinary As species were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Clinical information on the semen volume, sperm concentration and motility was employed to catalogue and evaluate semen quality according to WHO guidelines. As species concentrations in addition to other continuous variables were dichotomized by the medians and modelled as categorical variables in order to explore using the binary logistic regression possible associations between As exposure and semen quality. Results: Urinary concentrations (geometric mean ± SD, μg g-1 creatinine) of different As species were 7.49 (±24.8) for AsB, 20.9 (±13.7) for DMA, 2.77 (±3.33) for MMA, and 4.03 (±3.67) for Asi (Asi III and AsiV). DMA concentrations above the median were significantly associated with below-reference sperm concentrations (P =0.02) after adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), abstinence, smoking and drinking habits. In addition, smoking was positively associated with MMA. Conclusion: Reduced parameters in human semen quality are positively associated with As exposure in a reproductiveage Chinese cohort. © 2012 Xu et al.licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Tian M.,Chinese Institute of Urban Environment | Bao H.,Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Institute for Population and Family Planning | Martin F.L.,Lancaster University | Zhang J.,Chinese Institute of Urban Environment | And 3 more authors.
Biology of Reproduction | Year: 2014

Whether there is a relationship between quality, DNA methylation, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in human-derived sperm specimens is unknown. A cohort (n = 118) of male partners of couples who were undergoing fertility assessment because of an idiopathic inability to conceive were recruited. Sperm motility parameters were determined by computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA), while sperm quality was assessed using World Health Organization criteria, mtDNA copy number was measured by real-time PCR, and DNA methylation patterns were analyzed employing high-melting resolution PCR and bisulfite sequencing PCR. The mtDNA copy number negatively correlated with semen parameters, including sperm motility, concentration, morphology, progression, and motion characteristics (r for-0.19 to-0.54; P< 0.05 for all). As a surrogate marker for global DNA methylation, LINE-1 negatively correlated with sperm motility (r = -0.25; P = 0.009). Meanwhile, after adjustment for age, length of abstinence, smoking, and alcohol intake, there was a suggested association for increased LINE-1 methylation and mtDNA copy number tertiles versus sperm motility (odd ratios were 1.0, 2.6, and 4.7, and 1.0, 2.5, and 4.9, respectively). Altered mtDNA copy number and DNA methylation may serve as genetic and epigenetic markers to assess human sperm quality together with CASA parameters. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

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