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Wang J.,CAS National Center for Nanoscience and Technology | Lu W.,CAS National Center for Nanoscience and Technology | Tang C.,Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical science 307 Hospital | Liu Y.,Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical science 307 Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Analytical Chemistry | Year: 2015

We develop an inertial-based microfluidic cell sorter combined with an integrated membrane filter, allowing for size-based, label-free, and high-efficiency separation and enrichment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in whole blood. The cell sorter is composed of a double spiral microchannel that hydrodynamically focuses and separates large CTCs from small blood cells. The focused CTCs with the equilibrium position around the midline of microchannel are further captured and enriched by a membrane filter (pore size of 8 μm) attached at the middle outlet. This integrated microfluidic device can process 1 mL of whole blood containing spiked tumor cells (A549, human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line) within 15 min, with the capture efficiency of 74.4% at the concentration as low as tens of A549 cells per mL of whole blood. This microfluidic cell sorter is further adopted for isolation of CTCs from peripheral blood samples of patients with metastatic lung cancer. The immunostaining and CK-19 mRNA detection are applied for identification of captured CTCs, showing that our method can detect 90% of metastatic lung cancer patients before therapy, whereas the commercially used system can only detect 40% of the same patients. We also use the expression of CK-19 mRNA from captured CTCs as an indicator for monitoring the therapeutic efficiency, which correlates well with X-ray computed tomography (CT) assessment of the disease. © 2015 American Chemical Society.


PubMed | CAS National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical science 307 Hospital, Fudan University and Peking Union Medical College
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Analytical chemistry | Year: 2015

We develop an inertial-based microfluidic cell sorter combined with an integrated membrane filter, allowing for size-based, label-free, and high-efficiency separation and enrichment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in whole blood. The cell sorter is composed of a double spiral microchannel that hydrodynamically focuses and separates large CTCs from small blood cells. The focused CTCs with the equilibrium position around the midline of microchannel are further captured and enriched by a membrane filter (pore size of 8 m) attached at the middle outlet. This integrated microfluidic device can process 1 mL of whole blood containing spiked tumor cells (A549, human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line) within 15 min, with the capture efficiency of 74.4% at the concentration as low as tens of A549 cells per mL of whole blood. This microfluidic cell sorter is further adopted for isolation of CTCs from peripheral blood samples of patients with metastatic lung cancer. The immunostaining and CK-19 mRNA detection are applied for identification of captured CTCs, showing that our method can detect 90% of metastatic lung cancer patients before therapy, whereas the commercially used system can only detect 40% of the same patients. We also use the expression of CK-19 mRNA from captured CTCs as an indicator for monitoring the therapeutic efficiency, which correlates well with X-ray computed tomography (CT) assessment of the disease.


PubMed | Renmin University of China, Center for Metabolic Disease Research, Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical science 307 Hospital, Nanchang University and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in bioscience (Landmark edition) | Year: 2015

Caspase-1 activation senses metabolic danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and mediates the initiation of inflammation in endothelial cells. Here, we examined whether the caspase-1 pathway is responsible for sensing hyperlipidemia as a DAMP in bone marrow (BM)-derived Stem cell antigen-1 positive (Sca-(1+)) stem/progenitor cells and weakening their angiogenic ability. Using biochemical methods, gene knockout, cell therapy and myocardial infarction (MI) models, we had the following findings: 1) Hyperlipidemia induces caspase-1 activity in mouse Sca-(1+) progenitor cells in vivo; 2) Caspase-1 contributes to hyperlipidemia-induced modulation of vascular cell death-related gene expression in vivo; 3) Injection of Sca-1+ progenitor cells from caspase-1(-/-) mice improves endothelial capillary density in heart and decreases cardiomyocyte death in a mouse model of MI; and 4) Caspase-1(-/-) Sca-(1+) progenitor cell therapy improves mouse cardiac function after MI. Our results provide insight on how hyperlipidemia activates caspase-1 in Sca-(1+) progenitor cells, which subsequently weakens Sca-(1+) progenitor cell repair of vasculature injury. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of caspase-1 inhibition in improving progenitor cell therapy for MI.


PubMed | Shanxi Provincial Peoples Hospital, Renmin University of China, Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical science 307 Hospital, Temple University and Cardiovascular Research Center
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in bioscience (Landmark edition) | Year: 2015

Lysophospholipids (LPLs) are bioactive lipid-derived signaling molecules generated by the enzymatic and chemical processes of regiospecific phospholipases on substrates such as membrane phospholipids (PLs) and sphingolipids (SLs). They play a major role as extracellular mediators by activating G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and stimulating diverse cellular responses from their signaling pathways. LPLs are involved in various pathologies of the vasculature system including coronary heart disease and hypertension. Many studies suggest the importance of LPLs in their association with the development of atherosclerosis, a chronic and severe vascular disease. This paper focuses on the pathophysiological effects of different lysophospholipids on atherosclerosis, which may promote the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction and strokes. Their atherogenic biological activities take place in vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, monocytes and macrophages, dendritic cells, T-lymphocytes, platelets, etc.

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