Leaders Aesthetic Laser and Cosmetic Surgery Center

Seoul, South Korea

Leaders Aesthetic Laser and Cosmetic Surgery Center

Seoul, South Korea
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Rho N.K.,Korean Academy of Botulinum Toxin Therapy KABOTT | Rho N.K.,Leaders Aesthetic Laser and Cosmetic Surgery Center | Kim H.S.,Korean Academy of Botulinum Toxin Therapy KABOTT | Kim H.S.,Catholic University of Korea | And 13 more authors.
Korean Journal of Dermatology | Year: 2010

Background: The utilization of botulinum toxin has rapidly expanded into various aesthetic applications. Achieving success with the aesthetic use of neurotoxins depends on several factors, including an understanding of the anatomy, the methods of dilution and the injection technique. Any guidelines representing a consensus for aesthetic treatments using botulinum toxin type A (BTA) have not been published in Korea. Objective: We wanted to provide consensus recommendations on the treatment of facial wrinkles and benign masseter hypertrophy using BTA in Korean patients. Methods: A panel of experienced Korean dermatologists was convened to develop a clinical consensus. The clinical consensus was comprised of the recommendations of the panel and the guidelines on general issues, such as the reconstitution and handling of the BTA, the procedural considerations, the dosing and injection-site standardizations, and the prevention and treatment of unwanted effects. Specific recommendations were provided according to the area of treatment, including glabellar lines, horizontal forehead lines, lateral periorbital wrinkles and benign masseter hypertrophy. Results: The recommended final concentration of BTA was 50 units/ml (5 units/0.1 ml) after reconstitution with physiologic saline. For glabellar lines, the members recommend three injection points (a total of 8 units). For forehead wrinkles, the members recommend nine injections in two rows into the frontalis with 1 unit/point. For crow's feet, the members recommend three injections per side (7 units/side) at the lateral part of the orbicularis oculi. For benign masseter hypertrophy, three injections per side (24-30 units/side) were recommended. Conclusion: These consensus recommendations will provide a framework for Korean dermatologists who wish to perform safe and efficacious injection of BTA for facial rejuvenation.


Ahn B.K.,Aesthetic Laser and Cosmetic Surgery Center | Kim Y.S.,Kimbelle Catholic Skin Clinic | Kim Y.S.,Catholic University of Korea | Kim H.J.,OhKims Skin and Laser Clinic | And 2 more authors.
Dermatologic Surgery | Year: 2013

Background The use of botulinum toxin has rapidly expanded into various aesthetic applications. Any guideline representing a consensus for aesthetic treatments using botulinum toxin type A (BTA) in Asians has not been published. Objectives To provide consensus recommendations on common aesthetic problems which are treated by neurotoxin in Asians. Methods A panel of experienced Korean dermatologists was convened to develop a clinical consensus on common aesthetic problems involving the face, neck, and calves in Asians, based on their own extensive experience. Results The consensus recommendations address general questions regarding treatment and provide specific guidelines on each common aesthetic indication. The recommended final concentration of BTA was 50 U/mL after reconstitution with physiologic saline. For horizontal forehead lines, the members recommended nine injections in two rows into the frontalis with 1 U/point. For glabellar lines, the members recommended three injection points (a total of 8 U). For crow's feet, the members recommended three injections per side (7 U/side) at the lateral part of the orbicularis oculi. For infraorbital wrinkles, one to two points per side in the superficial subcutaneous space approximately 1 cm below the lash line were recommended (1-2 U/side). For nasal flare, one injection point in the middle of each ala nasi was recommended (a total of 2 U). For depressed nasal tip, a single injection deep within the columella was recommended, with a dose of 3 U. For benign masseter hypertrophy, the members recommended a six-point injection to the masseter (three points per side for a total of 50-60 U). For the treatment of calf hypertrophy, the members recommended a total dose of 100 to 120 U (50-60 U/side), divided between six injection points (approximately 8-10 U/point). Conclusion This guideline provides a framework for physicians who wish to perform safe and efficacious injections of BTA in Asians. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Lee S.M.,University of Ulsan | Kim M.S.,University of Ulsan | Rho N.K.,Leaders Aesthetic Laser and Cosmetic Surgery Center | Won C.H.,University of Ulsan | And 4 more authors.
Korean Journal of Medical Mycology | Year: 2012

Background: Paronychia is a common infectious disease affecting fingernails and toenails. Although bacterial and fungal infections as well as mechanical trauma may play roles in the pathogenesis of this disease, there are few bacteriological studies about paronychia in military personnel. Objective: To identify the causative bacteria of paronychia in military personnel. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the microbiological results of 145 patients who visited a tertiary referral hospital for Korean soldiers from August 2004 to October 2006. Results: Twenty-eight different types of aerobic bacteria were identified, with the most common being Staphylococcus aureus (38.0%), Streptococcus pyogenes (7.2%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.4%). Staphylococcus aureus was identified mostly in finger and toe paronychial lesions and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was recovered commonly from toe paronychial lesions. All cases of paronychia were controlled by the combination of antiseptic dressing, topical antibacterial ointment, oral antibiotics, and antimycotic agents. Conclusion: The types of bacteria that most commonly caused paronychia in military personnel were Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus pyogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, the commonly used oral antibiotics for paronychia, such as amoxicillin-clavulanate, clindamycin, and trimethoprim- sulfamethoxazole, are good choices in the treatment of paronychia in military personnel.


Park K.Y.,Chung - Ang University | Seok J.,Chung - Ang University | Rho N.K.,Leaders Aesthetic Laser and Cosmetic Surgery Center | Kim B.J.,Chung - Ang University | Kim M.N.,Chung - Ang University
Dermatologic Therapy | Year: 2016

Aging well has become the new target of preventative medicine, and aesthetic dermatology can contribute to this request. The polynucleotide (PN) containing products not only fill the space, but improve tissue regeneration, resulting in more natural tissue regeneration. Five Korean women received four times injections of long-chain PN filler in two-week intervals for skin rejuvenation. About 0.05 mL of material was injected in 40 points of one-side cheek. The pore and skin thickness were markedly improved in the patients in their 30s, whereas skin tone, melanin, wrinkles, and sagging were noticeably improved for patients in their 40s. There are no serious side effects. In conclusion, intradermal long-chain PN filler injection seems to be an effective and safe treatment for skin rejuvenation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Rho N.-K.,Leaders Aesthetic Laser and Cosmetic Surgery Center | Chang Y.-Y.,Oracle Inc. | Chao Y.Y.-Y.,Oracle Inc. | Furuyama N.,Oracle Inc. | And 11 more authors.
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery | Year: 2015

Background: Although the use of filling agents for soft-tissue augmentation has increased worldwide, most consensus statements do not distinguish between ethnic populations. There are, however, significant differences between Caucasian and Asian faces, reflecting not only cultural disparities, but also distinctive treatment goals. Unlike aesthetic patients in the West, who usually seek to improve the signs of aging, Asian patients are younger and request a broader range of indications. Methods: Members of the Asia-Pacific Consensus group-comprising specialists from the fields of dermatology, plastic surgery, anatomy, and clinical epidemiology-convened to develop consensus recommendations for Asians based on their own experience using cohesive polydensified matrix, hyaluronic acid, and calcium hydroxylapatite fillers. Results: The Asian face demonstrates differences in facial structure and cosmetic ideals. Improving the forward projection of the "T zone" (i.e., forehead, nose, cheeks, and chin) forms the basis of a safe and effective panfacial approach to the Asian face. Successful augmentation may be achieved with both (1) high-and low-viscosity cohesive polydensified matrix/hyaluronic acid and (2) calcium hydroxylapatite for most indications, although some constraints apply. Conclusion: The Asia-Pacific Consensus recommendations are the first developed specifically for the use of fillers in Asian populations. © 2015 by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.


PubMed | Chung - Ang University and Leaders Aesthetic Laser and Cosmetic Surgery Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Dermatologic therapy | Year: 2016

Aging well has become the new target of preventative medicine, and aesthetic dermatology can contribute to this request. The polynucleotide (PN) containing products not only fill the space, but improve tissue regeneration, resulting in more natural tissue regeneration. Five Korean women received four times injections of long-chain PN filler in two-week intervals for skin rejuvenation. About 0.05 mL of material was injected in 40 points of one-side cheek. The pore and skin thickness were markedly improved in the patients in their 30s, whereas skin tone, melanin, wrinkles, and sagging were noticeably improved for patients in their 40s. There are no serious side effects. In conclusion, intradermal long-chain PN filler injection seems to be an effective and safe treatment for skin rejuvenation.


Rho N.-K.,Leaders Aesthetic Laser and Cosmetic Surgery Center
Kosmetische Medizin | Year: 2011

There are several consensus guidelines, mostly based on the Caucasian experiences, for facial aesthetic uses of botulinum toxin type A. For Asians, only a few articles on the same subject have been published. This article is aimed to review the ethnic differences in facial anatomy which are relevant to botulinum toxin injection for facial aesthetics. Literature review of the anatomic diversities of the muscles of the forehead, glabellar, and periorbital areas is provided. Ethnic differences in the facial expression patterns are also discussed.


PubMed | Leaders Aesthetic Laser and Cosmetic Surgery Center
Type: Case Reports | Journal: The Journal of dermatology | Year: 2014

Angioma serpiginosum (AS) is a rare, benign, vascular disorder comprising non-blanchable punctate red to purple lesions in a gyrate or serpiginous configuration. We report a case of a 38-year-old woman with a red colored eruption on her chest which was present since puberty. A novel 532 nm potassium-titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser (Excel V, Cutera Inc., Brisbane, CA, USA) was applied which resulted in near complete resolution after two sessions of treatment.

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