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Wichita, KS, United States
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News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Sometimes good things come to those who wait. Two faculty advisers - Engineering Professors Panos Shiakolas and Pranesh Aswath - supervised a student team, led by Letia Blanco, about five years ago in designing and building a smart bandage, which allowed more efficient healing of wounds and delivery of multiple drugs on their own time schedules to the wound, she wasn't sure what would become of it. That design team now has a patent on their invention, which is titled, Controlled Release Nanoparticulate Matter Delivery System. "Our goal was to protect the wound and increase infection control," said Blanco, who is a lead engineer at Raytheon, after graduating from UTA with a degree in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. "Raytheon teamed up with UTA to secure the patent. It's very exciting." Blanco led the team that senior year in 2010. Also on the team were: Christopher Alberts, Kyle Godfrey, Andrew Patin and Chris Grace, all Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering graduates; Panos Shiakolas, UTA associate professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department; and Pranesh Aswath, UTA professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department and vice provost for academic planning and policy. In addition, the team presented its findings through a refereed conference paper at the 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers Winter Annual Meeting conference and at a 2011 Biomedical Engineering Conference. More than half a million people in the United States seek medical treatment for burns every year and 40,000 of those have injuries severe enough to require hospitalization. In addition to the millions who suffer from burns, Blanco said the project appealed to the team because it had the ability to help soldiers in the field. "Many times, soldiers' dressings would have to be applied over and over again because health care providers would have to apply medicine," Blanco said. "Every time they had to do that, they had to undress and redress the wound. That process of changing the dressings was more dangerous than the technology we designed and developed." The device the student team designed increases the amount of time between dressing changes in two ways. First, a hydrogel is used to control the wound's temperature and that enables better, controlled drug delivery. Second, the device consists of many separate modules, which are connected by a flexible plastic allowing the bandage to comfortably conform to any wound. A lateral wiring scheme allows for bandage size customizing. Removable medicine trays allow used hydrogel to be removed and the electrical components sterilized, then recharged and reused. The team showed in its research that the device could be a profitable product that would reduce infections, ease patient discomfort, shorten hospital stays, lower medical costs and save lives. Just for the record, this is Patent No. 9,522,241 and was issued on Dec. 20, 2016. The entry also won the only award given out in 2011for the prestigious American Society for Materials International Undergraduate Design Competition. In addition, the students presented the findings at a 2012 ASME conference. Aswath, one of the senior design project's advisers, said the project shows the value of undergraduate research. "This is just one example of outstanding work done by our undergraduate students who can compete at the highest level and win competitions and get patents awarded," Aswath said. "They are all now successful in their careers and we are still in touch with the lead of the team, Letia Blanco, who is a rising star at Raytheon." Aswath said the patent embodies UTA's theme of health and the human condition within the University's Strategic Plan Bold Solutions | Global Impact. Shiakolas said the University is working with Blanco and Raytheon to look at future steps of commercializing the product. About The University of Texas at Arlington The University of Texas at Arlington is a Carnegie Research-1 "highest research activity" institution. With a projected global enrollment of close to 57,000, UTA is one of the largest institutions in the state of Texas. Guided by its Strategic Plan 2020 Bold Solutions|Global Impact, UTA fosters interdisciplinary research and education within four broad themes: health and the human condition, sustainable urban communities, global environmental impact, and data-driven discovery. UTA was recently cited by U.S. News & World Report as having the second lowest average student debt among U.S. universities. U.S. News & World Report ranks UTA fifth in the nation for undergraduate diversity. The University is a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is ranked as the top four-year college in Texas for veterans on Military Times' 2017 Best for Vets list.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Daisy Intelligence Corporation, an artificial intelligence software-as-a-service platform, announced today that they will be offering a total of $30,000 in scholarship support for students in the Engineering Science program at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering. The new Daisy Intelligence Scholarships in Engineering Science will be awarded each year to three students completing their fourth year of study in each of the program’s Electrical and Computer Engineering, Robotics, and Mathematics, Statistics & Finance majors. Three scholarships will be awarded each year based on academic achievement and each recipient will receive a $2,000 Daisy Scholarship. The Engineering Science program at the University of Toronto is one of the most distinguished engineering programs in the world and attracts top students who are looking for an academic challenge. This enriched program is widely regarded as an innovator in engineering education and provides students with excellent preparation in a wide range of engineering, science and mathematical fields. Historically, about half of the program’s graduates pursue post-graduate studies at top graduate schools around the world. “As a U of T Engineering Science alumnus, I wanted to recognize student achievement in one of the best engineering programs in the world. This program is critical to keeping Canada on the leading edge of artificial intelligence and critical to maintaining Canada’s global competitiveness. I am so happy we can do our part in recognizing these high academic achievers in this important program.” said Gary Saarenvirta, CEO of Daisy Intelligence. “This is our first year awarding the Daisy Intelligence Scholarships in Engineering Science and we intend to continue this to help the university recruit and retain the best and brightest students.” Saarenvirta received his undergraduate degree in 1988 and holds both his B.A.Sc. and M.A.Sc. degrees in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Toronto. His M.A.Sc. was in Computational Fluid Dynamics at the University of Toronto’s Institute for Aerospace Studies. The Daisy Intelligence Scholarships in Engineering Science recipients are those who attained academic excellence in their fourth year of study. Christina Heidorn External Relations Officer, Division of Engineering Science Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, University of Toronto engsci(at)ecf.utoronto.ca 416.978.8634


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

SAE International announces that registration is now open for the SAE 2017 Noise and Vibration Conference and Exhibition which will be held at the DeVos Place Convention Center in Grand Rapids, Michigan on June 12-15, 2017. This is the premier technical event dedicated to mobility noise, vibration and harshness. Held biennially, this conference serves as a forum for leading automotive, commercial vehicle, and aerospace professionals to share the latest technologies surrounding NVH, and sound quality. The following topics related to vehicle design, engineering and testing will be the focus of the event: The SAE 2017 Noise and Vibration Convention and Exhibition’s technical program features chats with experts, workshops and keynote presentations. The keynote presentations will be presented by Prof. Ahmet Selamet, Fellow, Acoustical Society of America, Fellow, SAE International, Senior CAR Fellow, Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at The Ohio State University; and Gabriella Cerrato, Manager, Global Engineering Services at Bruel & Kjaer. By attending this event, attendees will gain a full understanding of NVH and sound quality issues related to vehicle design, engineering and testing; learn about the latest trends and solutions in the marketplace; and exchange ideas with leading experts and industry peers from around the world. Attendees will also have the opportunity to attend INCE USA’s NOISE-CON 2017’s sessions along with the shared show floor between the two conferences, due to the co-location of the two events. To learn more about the SAE 2017 Noise and Vibration Convention and Exhibition or to register, visit sae.org/nvc. To request media credentials, email pr(at)sae(dot)org or call 1-724-772-8522. SAE International is a global association committed to being the ultimate knowledge source for the engineering profession. By uniting over 127,000 engineers and technical experts, we drive knowledge and expertise across a broad spectrum of industries. We act on two priorities: encouraging a lifetime of learning for mobility engineering professionals and setting the standards for industry engineering. We strive for a better world through the work of our charitable arm, the SAE Foundation, which helps fund programs like A World in Motion® and the Collegiate Design Series™.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--A Tallahassee high school team is competing this week in the finals of the Florida Astronaut Challenge at the Kennedy Space Center, thanks to their skills and some help from Florida-based Harris Corporation. Harris is sponsoring the St. John Paul II Catholic High School’s Aerospace Engineering Club, which is competing among 14 other Florida schools in four space-themed events Feb. 15-17. The Florida Astronaut Challenge is an annual event that enables high school students to show off their Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) skills through team-based challenges, particularly in aerospace science. Harris sponsored the team as part of its STEM outreach. To help foster the next generation of innovators, Harris invests heavily in time and resources to support STEM education at all levels. Over the past 10 years, Harris has contributed more than $22 million to educational institutions in support of STEM-related education, and employees have volunteered more than 11,000 hours in STEM-related outreach – impacting 37,000 students. Harris Corporation is a leading technology innovator, solving customers’ toughest mission-critical challenges by providing solutions that connect, inform and protect. Harris supports government and commercial customers in more than 100 countries and has approximately $6 billion in annual revenue. The company is organized into three business segments: Communication Systems, Space and Intelligence Systems and Electronic Systems. Learn more at harris.com.


News Article | March 11, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

Nikhil Gupta is an associate professor, and Steven Zeltmann is a student researcher, in the Composite Materials and Mechanics Laboratory of the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at New York University Tandon School of Engineering. The authors contributed this article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. Every year, auto shows arrive in cities around the world, but only a select few have the limelight and luster that is special to New York's. The auto industry has experienced tremendous changes in the past five years due to the roller-coaster ride of gas prices, the introduction of new technologies, and shifts in consumer taste. But one trend stands out: The lightweight composite materials on display at last year's New York International Auto Show offer insight into what to expect as the 2016 show opens later this month — and for the automobile models of the future. Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites — also called carbon-fiber laminates — are the next-generation materials for making cars lighter, more fuel efficient and safer. Carbon laminate is extremely strong and stiff because of its woven layers of nearly pure carbon fibers bonded together by a hardened plastic, such as epoxy resin. Because the fibers are entirely carbon, their density is only about 1.6 grams per cubic centimeter (g/cc) — comparable to the density of table sugar — resulting in carbon laminates with densities of around 1.3 to 1.5 g/cc. However, the carbon laminate manufacturing process is complex and requires either manual labor or expensive robotic machines, both of which result in high costs for the finished part. And, the most commonly used polymer (epoxy resin) requires 24 to 50 hours to solidify after it's infused into the carbon fiber, further increasing costs.In contrast, the density of steel is about 7.8 g/cc. Carbon fibers are slightly stiffer than steel, but have one-fifth the weight. Carbon laminate density is so low, it even beats the lightest structural metal, magnesium, which has a density of 1.8 g/cc. Predictably, high-end performance cars use large quantities of composites in their structures to reduce weight and reach the performance goals of higher top speeds, faster acceleration or increased battery life (in electric cars). However, the attractive appearance of carbon laminate, along with the public's fascination with this wonder material, has led to many cosmetic applications as well. In fact, the cosmetic applications are quickly making their way into high-volume-production automobiles. [Carbon Nanofiber Makes Smart Yarn ] An example of a car with an all-carbon body is the McLaren 570S — the structural panels and body frame are made of carbon laminates. This $185,000 supercar has a 562 horsepower V8 engine with twin turbochargers, giving it a 0-to-60-mph acceleration of 3 seconds and a top speed of 204 mph (328 km/h). Because so much of the car is made from composites, it weighs only 3,150 lbs. (1,429 kilograms). Manufacturing a car like the 570S with an entirely composite structure is a massive undertaking. Since the first Formula 1 carbon-laminate car arrived in 1981, the technology has transitioned to only a select few production models — despite intense research and development efforts over the past 35 years. Some of the most complex challenges are producing carbon laminates in complex shapes, ensuring uniform penetration of the epoxy throughout the parts, taking into account the differing strength properties when the material is struck from different angles (strength is better in the direction of the fibers) and ensuring quality control. Overcoming these challenges is expensive, so carbon-laminate composites are only used extensively in models that are entirely performance-oriented, including the Alfa Romeo 4C, the new Ford GT and the hybrid Porsche 918. Not long ago, cars achieved weight reduction by removing as many parts as possible. Older, lightweight Porsches had nylon strings for interior door handles and no rear seats, and few high-performance cars were fitted with radios or any other equipment that wasn't strictly necessary. This is no longer the case, as we see in the interior of the McLaren 650S. The interior of the car also makes extensive use of carbon laminates, including the steering wheel spokes, allowing designers to add back in weight for a navigation system and many comfort features. In addition to providing weight savings, the carbon-fiber parts serve an aesthetic role: a reminder to the customer of the advanced materials used in the construction of their vehicle. Sports versions of luxury cars also extensively use composites, as in the Maserati GranTurismo MC, where the entire hood structure and a large number of other components are made of carbon laminate. In that example, a large number of joints, rivets and screws are used to fasten the carbon laminate parts. Engineers once believed that drilling holes for fasteners would break the fibers and make the component weak. However, innovative engineering design and extensive testing have remedied those problems.  Because the metallic parts touching carbon laminate corrode faster, designers have developed special coatings for the fasteners and on the carbon laminates. These expensive cars are not often exposed to harsh environments and tend to receive better maintenance, which helps minimize this problem, but it remains a concern in transitioning composites technology into mainstream cars.  Similar to the 650S, the GranTurismo MC also includes the option for carbon laminate trim for several interior components. Front dashboard trim, steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters, door sill inserts and side-door inserts are available in carbon laminate trim. However, the appearance is the major reason for using carbon laminate in these locations. Some of the trim components replace wood or plastics used in previous models, which are just as lightweight, implying that the carbon laminate is used solely for cosmetic reasons in some of these applications. A number of external components of the GranTurismo MC are also made of carbon composite. The rear spoiler, door handles and rearview-mirror casings are examples of such components. The $85,000 Cadillac CTS-V is similarly equipped. Large components that are subject to aerodynamic loading, such as spoilers and splitters, can benefit greatly from the stiffness and light weight of carbon laminates. However, many of the other exterior trim pieces are made of carbon laminates primarily for aesthetic reasons. In many cars, such as the Audi R8, these trim pieces are available as extras. However, large components, such as the engine cover and side panels, save weight by replacing metallic components in the R8. Other, arguably more technically remarkable, composites have long been used in automobiles without any recognition — Toyota and others have long used finely dispersed nanoplatelets of clay to improve the UV resistance of plastic bumpers and the strength of nylon fan belts, but few people have noticed them due to their nondescript appearance.  By contrast, attractive-looking carbon laminates have become fashion statements because no other material replicates the combination of the fiber weave texture, deep black color and high glossy surface finish of carbon laminates. One significant avenue for the increased structural use of carbon laminates is electric cars. Lightweight materials are well suited to this emerging market segment because the driving range on one charge is extremely weight sensitive, battery placement options are improved by having complex form-fitting structural members and their appearance fits well with the futuristic aura that electric-car makers are trying to achieve.  As electric cars continue to move from the top tier of the market, such as the BMW i8, to a more accessible segment — such as the Tesla Model 3, BMW i3 and Volkswagen eGolf — they will continue to rely on carbon laminates. The i8 and i3 already have carbon laminate bodies for reducing weight.  The wide use as trim pieces underscores the popular desire to see advanced materials in even common cars. That car buyers associate carbon fiber with high performance and quality means the future for these materials in the automotive industry is promising.  At the 2016 New York International Auto Show later this month, we anticipate seeing a wider adoption of existing carbon laminate parts, such as rearview mirror casings, spoilers and rear diffusers. These parts are made by specialized carbon-laminate manufacturers that can now customize them for other models at a lower cost. A more widespread use of some of the large-scale parts, such as seat structures, may also emerge this year. Extensive use of carbon laminates in a vehicle from a relatively more affordable segment, the BMW i3 — which achieved sales of 11,024 units in 2015 — will provide performance results in routine rugged driving conditions and better estimates for repair costs. Data from such models will help push carbon laminates into more mainstream cars. As the emissions standards tighten, all cars will require the lightening made possible by advanced materials.  The new wave of electric cars will likely promote the merger of the functional and aesthetic roles of composites, and continuous improvement in carbon-fiber laminate technology is accelerating these applications. Already, engine cover, trunk liners and rear air diffusers appear to be on their way towards wider adoption.  But perhaps most critically, the all-carbon-composite bodies of the i3 and i8 — and other production models — are providing data on the performance of hood and crash box designs in the event of a high-speed accident. So far, the outcome is excellent carbon composite performance under crash conditions, which will push usage further.  Follow all of the Expert Voices issues and debates — and become part of the discussion — on Facebook, Twitter and Google+. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. This version of the article was originally published on Live Science. Black to the Future: Carbon Fiber Research Seeds New Innovation (Op-Ed) Copyright 2016 LiveScience, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Global engineering group Cavotec has secured significant orders to supply its innovative aircraft systems to major airports in the United Arab Emirates, the UK and the US. The EUR 11.5 million contract wins, all received and confirmed in the past two months, underline the continued success of the Group’s advanced integrated aircraft utility systems at applications worldwide. “With the International Air Transport Association expecting airlines to take delivery of some 1,700 aircraft in 2017, and a 3.7 per cent annual average growth in air travellers, operators are looking for ways to ease bottlenecks and service aircraft efficiently. Cavotec’s solutions decrease aircraft turnaround time by integrating utility services into single solutions such as pop-up pits,” says Juergen Strommer, Chief Operating Officer of Cavotec’s Airports & Industry business unit. “We continue to see robust demand for our aircraft servicing systems at airports worldwide, and it’s an area on which we continue to focus,” adds Gary Matthews, Market Unit Director, Airports. For Dubai International Airport’s Concourse C, Cavotec has been awarded a turnkey contract to design, supply, install, test and commission Super Cool DX Pre-conditioned Air (PCA) units. In the US, the orders include fuel hydrant systems for applications at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and La Guardia Airport. Cavotec is to also supply its latest Series 2500+ 400Hz converters and hatch pit systems to the VT Mobile Aerospace Engineering Hangar (VTMAE) at Pensacola Internaional Airport in Florida. Deliveries are due to start later this year, and are scheduled for completion by early 2018. In the UK, Cavotec has secured a major advanced aircraft refuelling order with the end user in the US, deliveries of which are schedulded to be completed in the third quarter of 2017. Cavotec is a leading systems integrator of advanced ground support equipment in the global airports sector. The Group’s in-ground technologies minimise tarmac congestion, improve operational efficiency and reduce environmental impact at terminals, remote stands and hangars at commercial applications worldwide. Cavotec is a global engineering group that manufactures power transmission, distribution and control technologies that form the link between fixed and mobile equipment in the Ports & Maritime and Airports & Industry sectors. To find out more about Cavotec, visit our website at cavotec.com. The information in this release is subject to the disclosure requirements of Cavotec SA under the Swedish Securities Market Act and/or the Swedish Financial Instruments Trading Act. This information was publicly communicated on 22 February 2017, 12:00 CET.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: phys.org

Citizen science empowers people with little to no scientific training to participate in research led by professional scientists in different ways. The benefit of such an activity is often bidirectional, whereby professional scientists leverage the effort of a large number of volunteers in data collection or analysis, while the volunteers increase their knowledge on the topic of the scientific endeavor. Tandon researchers added the benefit of performing what can sometimes be boring or painful exercise regimes in a more appealing yet still therapeutic manner. The citizen science activity they employed entailed the environmental mapping of a polluted body of water (in this case Brooklyn's Gowanus Canal) with a miniature instrumented boat, which was remotely controlled by the participants through their physical gestures, as tracked by a low-cost motion capture system that does not require the subject to don special equipment. The researchers demonstrated that the natural user interface offers an engaging and effective means for performing environmental monitoring tasks. At the same time, the citizen science activity increased the commitment of the participants, leading to a better motion performance, quantified through an array of objective indices. Visiting Researcher Eduardo Palermo (of Sapienza University of Rome), Post-doctoral Researcher Jeffrey Laut, Professor of Technology Management and Innovation Oded Nov, late Research Professor Paolo Cappa, and Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Maurizio Porfiri provided subjects with a Microsoft Kinect sensor, a markerless human motion tracker capable of estimating three-dimensional coordinates of human joints that was initially designed for gaming but has since been widely repurposed as an input device for natural user interfaces. They asked participants to pilot the boat, controlling thruster speed and steering angle, by lifting one arm away from the trunk and using wrist motions, in effect, mimicking one widely adopted type of rehabilitative exercises based on repetitively performing simple movements with the affected arm. Their results suggest that an inexpensive, off-the-shelf device can offer an engaging means to contribute to important scientific tasks while delivering relevant and efficient physical exercises. "The study constitutes a first and necessary step toward rehabilitative treatments of the upper limb through citizen science and low-cost markerless optical systems," Porfiri explains. "Our methodology expands behavioral rehabilitation by providing an engaging and fun natural user interface, a tangible scientific contribution, and an attractive low-cost markerless technology for human motion capture."


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BROOKLYN, New York - Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have devised a method by which patients requiring repetitive rehabilitative exercises, such as those prescribed by physical therapists, can voluntarily contribute to scientific projects in which massive data collection and analysis is needed. Citizen science empowers people with little to no scientific training to participate in research led by professional scientists in different ways. The benefit of such an activity is often bidirectional, whereby professional scientists leverage the effort of a large number of volunteers in data collection or analysis, while the volunteers increase their knowledge on the topic of the scientific endeavor. Tandon researchers added the benefit of performing what can sometimes be boring or painful exercise regimes in a more appealing yet still therapeutic manner. The citizen science activity they employed entailed the environmental mapping of a polluted body of water (in this case Brooklyn's Gowanus Canal) with a miniature instrumented boat, which was remotely controlled by the participants through their physical gestures, as tracked by a low-cost motion capture system that does not require the subject to don special equipment. The researchers demonstrated that the natural user interface offers an engaging and effective means for performing environmental monitoring tasks. At the same time, the citizen science activity increased the commitment of the participants, leading to a better motion performance, quantified through an array of objective indices. Visiting Researcher Eduardo Palermo (of Sapienza University of Rome), Post-doctoral Researcher Jeffrey Laut, Professor of Technology Management and Innovation Oded Nov, late Research Professor Paolo Cappa, and Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Maurizio Porfiri provided subjects with a Microsoft Kinect sensor, a markerless human motion tracker capable of estimating three-dimensional coordinates of human joints that was initially designed for gaming but has since been widely repurposed as an input device for natural user interfaces. They asked participants to pilot the boat, controlling thruster speed and steering angle, by lifting one arm away from the trunk and using wrist motions, in effect, mimicking one widely adopted type of rehabilitative exercises based on repetitively performing simple movements with the affected arm. Their results suggest that an inexpensive, off-the-shelf device can offer an engaging means to contribute to important scientific tasks while delivering relevant and efficient physical exercises. "The study constitutes a first and necessary step toward rehabilitative treatments of the upper limb through citizen science and low-cost markerless optical systems," Porfiri explains. "Our methodology expands behavioral rehabilitation by providing an engaging and fun natural user interface, a tangible scientific contribution, and an attractive low-cost markerless technology for human motion capture." The paper, "A Natural User Interface to Integrate Citizen Science and Physical Exercise," has been published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS) and is available at http://journals. . Research was supported by the National Science Foundation. About the New York University Tandon School of Engineering The NYU Tandon School of Engineering dates to 1854, the founding date for both the New York University School of Civil Engineering and Architecture and the Brooklyn Collegiate and Polytechnic Institute (widely known as Brooklyn Poly). A January 2014 merger created a comprehensive school of education and research in engineering and applied sciences, rooted in a tradition of invention and entrepreneurship and dedicated to furthering technology in service to society. In addition to its main location in Brooklyn, NYU Tandon collaborates with other schools within NYU, the country's largest private research university, and is closely connected to engineering programs at NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai. It operates Future Labs focused on start-up businesses in downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn and an award-winning online graduate program. For more information, visit http://engineering. .


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Hagler & Associates offers an extraordinary opportunity for entry level professionals looking to gain the skills needed for a successful career within the business marketing industry. The company culture at Hagler & Associates is built on the philosophy that everyone must start at the entry level and all promotions to upper management are from within. All associates are cross-trained at the entry level of the business with the opportunity for promotion to management based off merit. The company’s President, Ahmad Hagler believes that the entry level side of any business teaches each employee the proper values, ethics, and skills desired in the management roles. We caught up with a few individuals from Hagler & Associates to find out more about their experiences they have had with this opportunity. Jessica Pabst, a young professional, has been working for Hagler & Associates for just about two years and has grown into the role as an Executive Assistant. Prior to working with Hagler & Associates, Jessica attended Centenary University and graduated with both a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing and well as an Associate’s Degree in Equine Science. After graduation she landed a job in the Equine Sports Medicine Field, but was injured shortly after and unable to return to the Equine Industry.  “Hagler & Associates gave me an opportunity when I was lost. Other than my Marketing degree, I had never worked in the field before. All my past experience was with horses.” Said Jessica, as we spoke about her opportunity. “Hagler & Associates gave me the guidance I needed to mold my skills, and figure out where I fit best.” Ms. Pabst worked in the entry level position for nine weeks before growing into her role as an Executive Assistant. Dylan Kelly, a sophomore at the University of Maryland College Park, started working for Hagler & Associates in May of 2016 as a summer intern. Prior to his beginning his internship, Dylan worked at a gym daycare, but did not feel the position aligned with his future goals.  Dylan explained his experience thus far by stating “Since working at Hagler & Associates I have matured in every aspect in my life, being held accountable has made all the difference.” By working at Hagler & Associates, Dylan realized that he can do so much more with his degree than work in a lab. Dylan’s long term goal is to use his degree in Aerospace Engineering to create a product that he can build a business around. Overall, the greatest experience Dylan feels he has gained thus far is the mentorship he has gained from Ahmad Hagler and his managing partners. Sean Kropfeld, one of Hagler & Associates newest representatives, believes that his opportunity is one of a kind. After running his own business in the wholesale industry for twenty three years, Sean’s business became internet based. It was not soon after; he took an entry level position working with the Hagler & Associates Team. For Sean, training from the entry level has been an eye opener, but a positive experience. “I am very fortunate to not only have the opportunity for advancement to the highest level of management, but my mentors have the plan laid out for me. That is not something that is very common for companies these days” Sean reflects on his opportunity with the company. Long term, Sean plans to grow with the marketing firm and assist Hagler & Associates with their expansion. The business structure at Hagler & Associates is clear and precise when it comes to promotions, ideal for entry level opportunity. Although all from different backgrounds, the team at Hagler & Associates has similar goals. With a team such as this, Hagler & Associates will continue to exceed market expansion goals.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: phys.org

Developing the next generation of UAVs requires revolutionary vehicle concepts that are compact, hover-efficient, high-speed capable, highly maneuverable with low acoustic-signatures and high gust tolerance. Benedict, a professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at Texas A&M University, and his team have been conducting pioneering research on these hover-capable Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) concepts for the Army, Navy and NASA, along with the University of Maryland. Through this research, Benedict hopes to develop the next generation of propulsion systems for large-scale UAVs. He believes that these propulsion systems may have some performance advantages in terms of efficiency, forward flight speed, agility and gust tolerance when compared to conventional helicopter rotors. So far, the key outcomes from this research are the development of the first flying cyclocopter, the only two-winged hover-capable flapping-wing aircraft in the 100-gram weight category, and successful demonstration of hover to forward flight transition of a 250-gram quad-biplane. These novel concepts have shown unprecedented performance over conventional helicopters at micro scales. Research at Texas A&M will now focus on upscaling the cyclopcopter and flapping wing for larger vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) capable UAVs. Today, large-scale UAVs are used for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance types of missions, as well as carrying weapons systems and other large payloads. They also have civilian applications, such as aerial photography and potential package delivery. VTOL is highly desired for any of these applications. A cyclocopter uses a cycloidal rotor consisting of multiple airfoils rotating around a horizontal axis to generate lift and thrust. This makes it very maneuverable, able to transition from a stable hovering position to high-speed forward flight without needing to pitch itself forward like a helicopter. At small scales, cyclocopters are able to utilize available 3-D space, requiring a much smaller footprint than conventional helicopters, resulting in a highly compact flying vehicle. Adam Kellen, an aerospace graduate student on Benedict's team says, "Developing cutting edge VTOL UAVs requires engineers to consider alternative propulsion methods to combat poor flight time. The cycloidal rotors' ability to operate at high-pitch amplitudes without stalling among other aerodynamic phenomenon at micro scales are key to its performance and are the focus of the current UAV scale research." Benedict's team is looking at the feasibility of upscaling their cycloidal rotor to be used on larger VTOL UAVs weighing hundreds of pounds, and whether they would be viable in small manned aircraft. They are targeting test drones scaled up in size in the tens of pounds. They will be looking at how the vehicles perform as the scale increases, how they compare to helicopters and whether they become more efficient with scaling up. Biological flapping-wing flight offers superior maneuverability with excellent gust tolerance. Benedict's research will focus on understanding the underlying unsteady aeroelastic mechanisms present in flapping wings and how these would scale up with size. Benedict's goal is to understand why, in nature, only insects and the smallest of birds are capable of hover flight. The team will develop some aeroelastic scaling laws and conduct some benchtop experiments using a scaled-up flapper around four times the size of the wing used on their 60-gram robotic hummingbird. The goal is to measure the forces, wing shape and flowfield around the wing. This will help them understand the underlying physics on a scaled-up wing. Based on these results, they will decide whether it is worthwhile to build a scaled-up flapping-wing UAV. Scalability in both cases entails understanding how aerodynamics, structural mechanics, vehicle dynamics/stability/controllability and weight scales with size. State-of-the-art test rigs will be designed and built to measure the aeromechanics of dynamically scaled rotor/wing models in a range of various sizes. "If this study proves that these concepts are indeed scalable up to a manned aircraft, it could pave the way for the next generation of flying vehicles such as personal air vehicles, air taxis and more," Benedict says. Explore further: Tiny UAVs and hummingbirds are put to test

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