Los Angeles, CA, United States
Los Angeles, CA, United States

AECOM Technology Corporation is a professional technical and management support services firm. Ranked in terms of revenue from design projects, the company was the number one design firm for 2010 and 2011 by Engineering News-Record and ranked number one by Architectural Record for 2008. It provides services in the areas of transportation, planning, environmental, energy, water and government. With approximately 45,000 employees in 2012, AECOM is listed at #353 on the Fortune 500 list. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 2.24M | Year: 2011

The U.K. population is projected to reach 80 million by 2050 and it is anticipated that the overwhelming majority will continue to live in cities. Besides becoming more densely populated, future cities will be surrounded with expanding urban areas. Interactions within cities; across urban areas and with surrounding cities, towns and rural areas with the rest of the UK will place new and different demands on infrastructure, whether housing, energy, transport, freight distribution and disposal of waste. Decisions that are made now will have profound implications for the resultant pressures on transport, living space, energy use, and ecosystem services (the benefits humans receive from ecosystems). These decisions will play out at two fundamentally different spatial scales. First, and by far the better understood, are those decisions that concern individual households and their neighbourhoods. These include issues of how their members move around, what kinds of housing they occupy, how their energy demands and waste production are reduced, and how their negative influences on the wider environment generally will be limited. Second, broad scale strategic decisions regarding regional planning will determine where in the U.K. population growth is primarily accommodated. This will determine, and be shaped by, the kinds of transport and energy infrastructure required, and the environmental impacts. Obviously these two sets of decisions are not independent. The demands for and impacts of broad scale development (whether this be the creation of new urban areas or the intensification of existing ones) - and thus how this is best achieved to deliver sustainability- will be influenced not by the typical demands and impacts exhibited now by households, but by the way in which these have been changed in response to the modification to the associated infrastructure. This makes for a challenging problem in predicting and evaluating the possible consequences of different potential scenarios of regional development. The proposed study SElf Conserving URban Environments (SECURE) will address this grand challenge of integration across scales (the global aim) by developing a range of future regional urbanization scenarios, and exploring their consequences for selected high profile issues of resource demand and provision (transport, dwellings, energy, and ecosystem services) alongside sustainable waste utilisations. In doing so, it will build on findings of research outputs of several previous SUE projects and harness its relationship in the context of policy and economic growth. The study includes specific research objectives under five broad cross-cutting themes - Urbanisation, Ecosystems Services, Building and Energy, Stakeholder Engagement and Policy Integration across themes. SECURE is designed to assemble novel deliverables to bring about step change in current knowledge and practice. The North East Region will be used as a test bed and evaluation of transitional scenarios leading up to 2050 will quantify the benefits of integration across the scales through conservation across the themes. SECURE will deliver policy formulation and planning decisions for 2030 and 2050 with a focus on creating Sustainable Urban Environment.The contributors to this project are researchers of international standings who have collaborated extensively on several EPSRC funded projects, including the SUE research since its inception. The SECURE team builds on their current collaboration on the SUE2 4M project. The Project consortium is led by Newcastle - Prof Margaret Bell as PI and Dr Anil Namdeo as co-ordinator alongside Dr Jenny Brake with academic partners: Prof David Graham (Environmental Engineering), Prof David Manning (Geosciences); from Loughborough: Prof Kevin Lomas, Prof Jonathan Wright and Dr Steven Firth (Civil and Building Engineering); from Sheffield: Prof Kevin Gaston and Dr Jonathan Leake (Animal and Plant Sciences).


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 3.68M | Year: 2014

The UK water sector is experiencing a period of profound change with both public and private sector actors seeking evidence-based responses to a host of emerging global, regional and national challenges which are driven by demographic, climatic, and land use changes as well as regulatory pressures for more efficient delivery of services. Although the UK Water Industry is keen to embrace the challenge and well placed to innovate, it lacks the financial resources to support longer term skills and knowledge generation. A new cadre of engineers is required for the water industry to not only make our society more sustainable and profitable but to develop a new suite of goods and services for a rapidly urbanising world. EPSRC Centres for Doctoral Training provide an ideal mechanism with which to remediate the emerging shortfall in advanced engineering skills within the sector. In particular, the training of next-generation engineering leaders for the sector requires a subtle balance between industrial and academic contributions; calling for a funding mechanism which privileges industrial need but provides for significant academic inputs to training and research. The STREAM initiative draws together five of the UKs leading water research and training groups to secure the future supply of advanced engineering professionals in this area of vital importance to the UK. Led by the Centre for Water Science at Cranfield University, the consortium also draws on expertise from the Universities of Sheffield and Bradford, Imperial College London, Newcastle University, and the University of Exeter. STREAM offers Engineering Doctorate and PhD awards through a programme which incorporates; (i) acquisition of advanced technical skills through attendance at masters level training courses, (ii) tuition in the competencies and abilities expected of senior engineers, and (iii) doctoral level research projects. Our EngD students spend at least 75% of their time working in industry or on industry specified research problems. Example research topics to be addressed by the schemes students include; delivering drinking water quality and protecting public health; reducing carbon footprint; reducing water demand; improving service resilience and reliability; protecting natural water bodies; reducing sewer flooding, developing and implementing strategies for Integrated Water Management, and delivering new approaches to characterising, communicating and mitigating risk and uncertainty. Fifteen studentships per year for five years will be offered with each position being sponsored by an industrial partner from the water sector. A series of common attendance events will underpin programme and group identity. These include, (i) an initial three-month taught programme based at Cranfield University, (ii) an open invitation STREAM symposium and (iii) a Challenge Week to take place each summer including transferrable skills training and guest lectures from leading industrialists and scientists. Outreach activities will extend participation in the programme, pursue collaboration with associated initiatives, promote brand awareness of the EngD qualification, and engage with a wide range of stakeholder groups (including the public) to promote engagement with and understanding of STREAM activities. Strategic direction for the programme will be formulated through an Industry Advisory Board comprising representatives from professional bodies, employers, and regulators. This body will provide strategic guidance informed by sector needs, review the operational aspects of the taught and research components as a quality control, and conduct foresight studies of relevant research areas. A small International Steering Committee will ensure global relevance for the programme. The total cost of the STREAM programme is £9m, £2.8m of which is being invested by industry and £1.8m by the five collaborating universities. Just under £4.4m is being requested from EPSRC


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2017

Sustainable Multi-functional Automated Resilient Transport Infrastructures ETN, will bring together a stimulating platform where the stakeholders of the transport infrastructure sector will work alongside world-wide experts in smartening of systems (developers of high-tech sensors, advanced monitoring equipment, automated structures, etc.,) with direct support from the roads, railways and airports managers. This environment will enable talented graduates to conceive the transport infrastructure network of the future and will provide them with world-wide extended training in each of the four pillars supporting the SMARTI vision: designed to last by maximising recycling and minimizing impact (Sustainable), conceived not for transport purposes only and towards optimisation of land use (Multi-functional), equipped for communicating with managers and users, to allow a more intuitive use and a simplified management (Automated), built to be adaptable to natural and anthropogenic hazards (Resilient). The consortium will combine and share expertise to offer advanced scientific training structured into network-wide thematic taught modules combined with original research supported by secondments that will expose fellows to both academia and industry and will also allow them with the possibility to be award with Doctoratus Europeus. The training programme will be enriched by specific modules to support job creation by enabling the fellows with business, entrepreneurship, communication, project management and other transferrable skills. A tailored Dissemination strategy will evaluate the variety of channels and means appropriate to allow the fellows to be prepared and successful in reaching both scientific and larger public audiences. As a result, SMARTI ETN will create a new generation of highly-skilled and appealing professionals that will be in great demand in this rapidly expanding field and will benefit Europe and developing countries


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 23.28K | Year: 2014

The Climate Change Act 2008 requires a 34% cut in 1990 greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 and at least an 80% reduction in emissions by 2050. Residential and commercial buildings account for 25% and 18% of the UKs total CO2 emissions respectively and therefore have a significant role to play in a national decarbonisation strategy. As the UK has some of the oldest and least efficient buildings in Europe, there is substantial scope for improving the efficiency of energy end-use within UK buildings. However efforts to improve building energy efficiency, specifically the thermal efficiency of the building fabric, have to date focused primarily on the analysis and assessment of single properties. The slow uptake of insulation measures through the Green Deal and Energy Companies Obligation testifies to the difficulty of achieving these changes on a house-by-house basis. If the UK is to achieve its energy and climate policy targets, then a more ambitious whole-city approach to building energy improvements is needed. Technical innovations in remote sensing and infrared thermography mean that it is now possible to conduct building efficiency surveys at a mass scale. The challenge is how such data can be improved (for example moving from 2D plan imagery to 3D models of the built environment) and combined with systems analysis tools to inform effective retrofit strategies. The Urban Scale Building Energy Network will investigate this research challenge by bringing together five academic co-investigators with disciplinary expertise from across the building retrofit value chain from remote autonomous sensing to building physics, energy systems design, consumer behaviour and policy. Working with two experienced mentors from the fields of energy systems and building energy services, the co-investigators will undertake a series of activities in collaboration with project partners from industry and government to better understand the research challenge and develop roadmaps for future research. The activities include: - Two workshops and a series of bilateral meetings for the academic team to learn about each others expertise and how it can be coordinated and brought to bear on the research challenge. The project mentors will play a crucial role here, helping the co-investigators to create personal development plans that will build both technical and non-technical skills for successful careers. - A workshop with over 20 representatives from government and industry to discuss previous experience and the perceived obstacles to more ambitious building energy retrofits. - An active online communications strategy incorporating a project website, YouTube videos, and a Twitter hashtag campaign in order to engage the general public and understand how households and commercial building occupants understand the challenge of transforming the UKs building stock. - A feasibility study to summarize the state of the art in new sensing technologies and analysis techniques for building thermal energy performance assessment and to identify major outstanding challenges for future research proposals. The proposed network will therefore facilitate collaboration between academics, industry, government and the general public to address a question of great national importance. The project outputs will help to create a wider understanding of the specific challenges facing the UKs aspirations for the transformation of its building stock as well as highlighting potentially fruitful avenues for research. The network therefore aspires to build upon this twelve-month programme of work and develop significant long-term research collaborations with benefits for academic knowledge, society and the wider economy.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

Thousands of sites across Europe are polluted with toxic metals and organic solvents; many more exist worldwide. As EU population grows, clean water will determine the quality of life and economic stability. Most sites remain contaminated because existing technology is costly and disruptive. Society needs an innovative way to decontaminate soil and groundwater directly underground. In METAL-AID, we will develop new technologies through fundamental knowledge. We are a consortium of experts in natural materials, contaminant reactivity, groundwater treatment and environment policy, spread over 4 consulting firms, 6 universities and a government agency. We will train 14 early stage researchers (ESRs) through integrated, intersectoral research, using advanced technology, ranging from nanometre to field scale. ESRs will gain technical, business and personal skills, as they push a promising soil and groundwater remediation technology toward commercialisation. To meet the METAL-AID goals, the ESRs will: 1) Test known layered double hydroxide (LDH) and redox active green rust (GR) reactants that show promise for remediating toxic metals and chlorinated compounds and invent new ones; 2) Derive thermodynamic and kinetic data, essential for safety assessment modelling; 3) Quantify reactant effectiveness and reacted phase stability and compare these with natural analogues; 4) Inject the new reactants at field sites operated by our beneficiaries. METAL-AID begins at technology readiness level, TRL 1 and runs to TRL 6, implementation. The government agency will provide guidance so our new technology complies with regulations and has promised R&D funding after the ETN ends, to carry it into full commercialisation. The ESRs will be trained to tackle challenges of concern to society, to communicate across sector boundaries and with the public, in a network that will last long after the project ends. We will provide a pool of scientists for roles in EUs knowledge based economy.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-3-5-01 | Award Amount: 4.52M | Year: 2010

MAGICPAH aims to explore, understand and exploit the catalytic activities of microbial communities involved in the degradation of persistent PAHs. It will integrate (meta-) genomic studies with in-situ activity assessment based on stable isotope probing particularly in complex matrices of different terrestrial and marine environments. PAH degradation under various conditions of bioavailability will be assessed as to improve rational exploitation of the catalytic properties of bacteria for the treatment and prevention of PAH pollution. We will generate a knowledge base not only on the microbial catabolome for biodegradation of PAHs in various impacted environmental settings based on genome gazing, retrieval and characterization of specific enzymes but also on systems related bioavailability of contaminant mixtures. MAGICPAH takes into account the tremendous undiscovered metagenomic resources by the direct retrieval from genome/metagenome libraries and consequent characterization of enzymes through activity screens. These screens will include a high-end functional small-molecule fluorescence screening platform and will allow us to directly access novel metabolic reactions followed by their rational exploitation for biocatalysis and the re-construction of biodegradation networks. Results from (meta-) genomic approaches will be correlated with microbial in situ activity assessments, specifically dedicated to identifying key players and key reactions involved in anaerobic PAH metabolism. Key processes for PAH metabolism particularly in marine and composting environments and the kinetics of aerobic degradation of PAH under different conditions of bioavailability will be assessed in model systems, the rational manipulation of which will allow us to deduce correlations between system performance and genomic blueprint. The results will be used to improve treatments of PAH-contaminated sites.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Small Business Research Initiative | Award Amount: 54.63K | Year: 2012

Awaiting Public Project Summary


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Small Business Research Initiative | Award Amount: 59.67K | Year: 2012

Awaiting Public Project Summary


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 27.62K | Year: 2012

This project will implement fast particle size distributions measurements during the 4th Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME IV) Study. The measurements will be made with a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) that is (1) capable of measuring the size range of interest for fresh smoke aerosols, (2) has fast time response that will be useful for all burns, and (3) is capable of measuring high concentrations. These are all characteristics of the aerosol produced by biomass burns in the FLAME experiments, particularly stack burn experiments of relatively short duration (minutes to tens of minutes from ignition to flame out and smoldering). The measurements will be complementary to those of several other investigators that include ice nuclei and evolution of secondary organic aerosols from the burn emissions. The research will help to elucidate fundamental physicochemical properties of biomass smoke, important to health and climate impacts of smoke aerosols.

The project is a unique collaboration between private sector and academic partners that has potential to lead to further developments in this arena. Broader impacts center on the continuation of FLAME collaborations begun a decade ago between the principal investigator and the other investigators on the project. Although students are not directly supported, it is anticipated that informal learning opportunities and collaborations with students working as part of the FLAME study will develop. Moreover, results to date from the principal investigators research and work activities have been successfully integrated into the classroom in his adjunct faculty position at Front Range Community College and into seminars presented at regional air quality meetings and at nearby institutions of higher learning. The project will enhance collaborations within the regional air quality research and education community.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Small Business Research Initiative | Award Amount: 66.89K | Year: 2012

Awaiting Public Project Summary

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