Adventure Aquarium

Camden, NJ, United States

Adventure Aquarium

Camden, NJ, United States

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News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

VOORHEES, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--American Water Works Company, Inc. (NYSE: AWK) announced today that it will hold its Annual Meeting of Stockholders at 10 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) on Friday, May 12, 2017, at The Camden Adventure Aquarium, 1 Riverside Drive, Camden, N.J. Stockholders of record at the close of business on the record date, March 16, 2017, are entitled to vote on all matters that properly come before the meeting. Interested parties may listen to the audio webcast over the Internet by logging on to the Investor Relations page of the company’s website at www.amwater.com. The online archive of the webcast will be available for 30 days following the annual meeting. Any media interested in attending the annual meeting of stockholders should call American Water External Affairs at 856-309-4690 by May 10, 2017. With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly-traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,800 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com. Click here to subscribe to Mobile Alerts for American Water.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

VOORHEES, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--American Water Works Company, Inc. (NYSE: AWK), the largest publicly traded U.S. water and wastewater utility company, held a groundbreaking ceremony today for the company’s new headquarters at One Water Street on The Camden Waterfront. When completed in late 2018, the five-story, 220,000 square foot facility will house more than 600 employees, consolidating four different locations in southern New Jersey. American Water President and CEO Susan Story was joined by U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross; Camden Mayor Dana Redd; Bob Martin, commissioner, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection; Timothy Lizura, president and COO of the New Jersey Economic Development Authority; William Hankowsky, president and CEO of Liberty Property Trust and more than 150 guests to celebrate the start of construction, which is expected to last about 18 months. “American Water and our employees are excited about our new home on the Camden waterfront,” said Susan Story, president and CEO of American Water. “We know this will be a place where we can become an even stronger presence in this great city; where we can attract and develop talent for today and the future; and where we can develop solutions to challenges for clean, safe, reliable and affordable water and water services for people across the country.” American Water’s headquarters will rise between the Ben Franklin Bridge and Adventure Aquarium. The environmentally friendly building will have panoramic views of the Philadelphia skyline, easy access to a waterfront park along the Delaware River, plentiful natural lighting, a rooftop terrace, and cutting-edge technology. Robert A.M. Stern Architects is the architect with Gensler designing the interior of the building. “The construction of One Water Street marks another great chapter in our city’s history,” said Mayor Redd. “I commend both Liberty Property Trust along with American Water for committing to Camden.” “This project also signifies a private investment of $1 billion in our city,” added Mayor Redd. “That commitment extends to hiring Camden residents and sourcing services and materials from Camden based companies. It will transform our waterfront and benefit our residents for many years to come.” Congressman Norcross added: “American Water's new headquarters will be more than just a building. It will stand as a symbol of Camden's renewal. Today we’re a step closer to realizing the vision of a revitalized Camden City with new jobs and opportunities for our entire community.” American Water is joining a growing group of prominent corporations locating their headquarters in Camden, including most recently the Philadelphia 76ers and Holtec International. These corporations are building upon the foundation of stability and growth built by anchor institutions, such as Cooper Hospital, Rowan University and Rutgers University-Camden. The Camden Waterfront is a new, mixed-use neighborhood that will attract corporations, employment and significant inward investment. Liberty Property Trust is working to put in place additional pieces of The Camden Waterfront master plan designed by Robert A.M Stern Architects including a proposed 180-room Hilton Garden Inn to be developed by Ensemble Real Estate Solutions and 188 residential units for which an agreement is pending with The Michaels Organization. The office component of the development will consist of build-to-suit projects for corporations seeking to grow their businesses in this environment. In addition, over $8 million is planned to be invested in the reconstruction and enhancement of the existing waterfront park creating more than 2.5 additional acres offering diverse opportunities for recreation, exploration, respite, and engagement with nature. As part of the overall project, Liberty has entered into a Community Investment Agreement with Camden in which it has committed to staffing 10 to 20 percent of the construction workforce with qualified Camden residents, maximizing sourcing from Camden-based businesses and providing opportunities for Camden youth through paid internships, participation in the creation of construction fencing murals and supporting youth sports. Additionally, 20 percent of the residential units will be allocated to affordable housing. “The significance of this moment is twofold,” said Liberty Property Trust Chairman, President, and CEO William Hankowsky. “Today, we not only celebrate breaking ground on American Water’s new corporate headquarters, but also recognize this is the very first step in establishing The Camden Waterfront as a thriving and dynamic community.” With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,700 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com. Click here to subscribe to Mobile Alerts for American Water.


Hyatt M.W.,Adventure Aquarium | Rosas-Rosas A.G.,University of Connecticut | Wolf J.C.,Experimental Pathology Laboratories Inc | Frasca S.,University of Connecticut
Journal of Aquatic Animal Health | Year: 2015

An aquarium-maintained female Red Irish Lord Hemilepidotus hemilepidotus presented with severe coelomic distension. The fish was anesthetized for ultrasonographic examination, which highlighted multiple cyst-like lesions in the liver and a distended ovary that was filled with follicles and an inspissated egg mass. Multiple exploratory celiotomies were performed for eggmass removal, liver biopsy, ovariosalpingectomy, and body wall rupture repair. Fourteen weeks after original presentation, and subsequent to 2 weeks of anorexia, the fish died. At necropsy, the liver was severely enlarged and distorted by multiple, coalescing, cyst-like spaces with no grossly normal liver parenchyma. The spleen also contained a raised cyst-like structure. Microscopically, the liver had welldemarcated foci of hepatocyte loss with retained meshworks of interconnected, perisinusoidal stellate cells. The fluid-filled spaces surrounded by stellate cells were not lined by epithelium or endothelium. The spleen had similar fluid-filled spaces formed of stellate cells. The cyst-like lesions in the liver were consistent with spongiosis hepatis; however, the concurrent development of a morphologically comparable lesion in the spleen is not typical of spongiosis hepatis cases. This case may represent the first report of spontaneously occurring spongiosis hepatis in a fish maintained in a public aquarium, as well as the first report in a fish of spongiosis hepatis-like lesions in an organ other than the liver. © American Fisheries Society 2015.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

The organization and its collaborating scientists satellite-tagged six great white sharks, including the first male NANTUCKET, MA--(Marketwired - November 02, 2016) - OCEARCH, a globally recognized nonprofit dedicated to the study and tracking of keystone marine species such as great white sharks, just concluded its 27th research expedition in Nantucket, MA. During the expedition the organization and its collaborating scientists successfully tagged, and sampled six great white sharks. The data collected will help researchers understand the entire North Atlantic white shark population. "More movement data remains the key to a comprehensive understanding of why so many white sharks are there," said Dr. Simon Thorrold, Senior Scientist and Director of the Ocean Life Institute at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. "Understanding where, when, and how the sharks use this area can help us better predict how human activities might be impacting them." After tagging three great white sharks -- Grey Lady, Miss Costa, and Madaket Millie -- within three days of expedition, OCEARCH was on hold for several days due to intense weather conditions. After its weather hold, OCEARCH tagged three more sharks, including two males -- the first ever satellite-tagged in the region. "It's especially exciting that we sampled and tagged our first large males, one of which was sexually mature," said lead scientist Dr. Robert Hueter, Director of the Center for Shark Research at Mote Marine Laboratory. "Once a male shark has been satellite tagged, you can overlap his tracks with the female tracks and begin to understand where they meet, eventually locating the breeding areas." In 2012 and 2013, OCEARCH tagged five mature, female great white sharks in the North Atlantic. Sharks like Lydia and Katharine have connected millions of people to their real-time migratory tracks. Lydia, a mature female, was the first satellite-tagged white shark documented crossing the mid-Atlantic Ridge; and Katharine, an immature female, was also the first great white shark documented entering the Gulf of Mexico. The data gathered from the six newly tagged great white sharks will build on these previous findings. "The six large white sharks sampled and tagged during Expedition Nantucket provide a major leap forward in science in the Northwest Atlantic," Dr. Hueter added. "We more than doubled the sample size of large sharks sampled for the institutions taking part in OCEARCH-supported studies." OCEARCH's mission is to enable data collection by providing collaborating researchers and institutions unprecedented access to mature marine animals. During the Nantucket Expedition, OCEARCH collaborated with scientists from the Center for Shark Research at Mote Marine Laboratory, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, University of Massachusetts, Wildlife Conservation Society' New York Aquarium, Adventure Aquarium, University of North Florida, University of South Carolina, Auburn University, College of Charleston, Cape Canaveral Scientific, Georgia Aquarium, and Cape Eleuthera Institute. "Up to 15 different researchers from 12 institutions received biological samples from each animal and are now analyzing results from the blood, mucus, muscle, parasite, genetic, and other samples collected," said Alisa Newton, Head of Aquatic Health at the Wildlife Conservation Society' New York Aquarium. "They will use the results to better define the normal physiology, biology and health of the Atlantic white shark population and, through that, the health of the environment that we share." All sharks were fitted with a satellite transmitter tag, PSAT tag, and an acoustic tag. In combination with the satellite tags, the PSAT tags will allow researchers to reconstruct three-dimensional movements of the white sharks up to six months after deployment. The resulting data will shed light on the interactions between white shark behavior and their physical environment. "Identifying habitat preferences will be an important component of comprehensive conservation strategy for white sharks in the North Atlantic," said Dr. Thorrold. "The fact that the first two male sharks to be satellite-tagged in the Atlantic also got PSAT tags was a real bonus for the expedition, and we are waiting eagerly to see how these tracks differ (or not) from the females tagged in this and previous expeditions." As the sharks' fins break the surface, the satellite tag will transmit their locations. "It's amazing to see that three of the sharks, Madaket Millie, YETI, and Grey Lady, are still in the area while Miss Costa is off the coast of South Carolina, George is off the coast of Virginia, and Cisco is off the coast of Delaware," said Chris Fischer, OCEARCH Founding Chairman and Expedition Leader. "We are learning so much already." Combined with the nine juvenile white sharks OCEARCH tagged during Expedition Montauk, there are now a total of 20 satellite-tagged white sharks of various life stages swimming around the North Atlantic. "The open access satellite data reporting in from these sharks will bring the previously blurry picture of white shark movement patterns into focus in the Atlantic, showing us the areas that are critical for white shark survival," Dr. Hueter said. Anyone and everyone can follow the sharks' movements by accessing the near-real time, free online Global Shark Tracker or by downloading the Global Shark Tracker App available for Apple and Android platforms. About OCEARCH OCEARCH is a recognized world leader in generating critical scientific data related to tracking (telemetry) and biological studies of keystone marine species such as great white and tiger sharks, in conjunction with conservation outreach and education at a measurable global scale. OCEARCH shares real-time migration data through OCEARCH's Global Shark Tracker -- In 2015, OCEARCH open-sourced the data on the Global Shark Tracker to 2.3 million users. OCEARCH also inspires current and future generations of explorers, scientists, and stewards of the ocean through its STEM Learning Program. The free STEM Curriculum, available for grades K-8 and created in partnership with Landry's, Inc. enables students to learn STEM skills while following the real-time data on the movements of their favorite sharks. The researchers OCEARCH supports work aboard the M/V OCEARCH, a 126' Cat-powered vessel equipped with a 75,000 lb. hydraulic research platform, where the ship serves as both mothership and at-sea laboratory. Scientists have approximately 15 minutes of access to live, mature sharks to conduct up to 12 studies. The sharks are measured, tissue and blood samples are collected, and satellite and acoustic transmitters are attached. Over 131 researchers from 69 regional and international institutions have partnered with OCEARCH. About Costa As the leading manufacturer of the world's clearest polarized performance sunglasses, Costa offers superior lens technology and unparalleled fit and durability. Still handcrafted today in Florida, Costa has created the highest quality, best performing sunglasses for outdoor enthusiasts since 1983. For Costa, conservation is all about sustainable fishing. Many fisheries that should be vibrant and healthy are all but devoid of native fish because they have fallen victim to poor fishing practices, unregulated development, lack of watershed protection or all of the above. Costa works with partners around the world to help increase awareness and influence policy so that both the fish and fishermen of tomorrow will have healthy waters to enjoy. Costa encourages others to help in any way they can. About Aurora Flight Sciences Aurora Flight Sciences is a leader in the development and manufacturing of advanced unmanned systems and aerospace vehicles. At the core of the company's DNA is a commitment to the science of autonomous flight; whether that means a fully autonomous drone, or a program that is breaking new ground in the interface between man and machine as relates to flight. Since its founding in 1989, Aurora's unmanned aircraft have supported a number of environmental and educational missions across the globe. From the North Slope in Alaska, to the wilderness in South Africa, Aurora has conducted dozens of successful scientific and philanthropic operations, proving the countless abilities and benefits of unmanned flight. For more information, visit www.aurora.aero.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

OCEARCH and its collaborating scientists will focus on mature white sharks in GA, SC, and NC PARK CITY, UT--(Marketwired - February 22, 2017) - After confirming the white shark nursery in Long Island, NY and satellite-tagging the first male white shark in Nantucket, MA, OCEARCH, a globally recognized nonprofit dedicated to the study and tracking of keystone marine species such as great white sharks and tiger sharks, is heading to the lowcountry -- Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina -- for the first time. OCEARCH's 28th expedition begins on February 22, 2017 and ends on March 15, 2017, kicking off in Savannah, GA with education and outreach events before heading to Hilton Head, SC to start the research on the water. "Data from the OCEARCH global Shark Tracker suggest our nearshore waters are critical overwintering habitat for white sharks. We are hopeful that this expedition will allow us to build on existing data to define habitat most critical to these apex predators," said Bryan Frazier, expedition lead scientist and Marine Biologist at the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The goal of this expedition is to gather data on the ecology, physiology, and behavior of sharks in the North Atlantic Ocean, and to increase the sample size of the Great White Shark research started in 2012 in Cape Cod, MA. "The Lowcountry region is a critical habitat for white sharks," said Chris Fischer, OCEARCH Founding Chairman and Expedition Leader. "We are looking to enable local researchers to expand the data on the species as well as the understanding of their local resources." Combined with the nine juvenile white sharks OCEARCH tagged in Long Island, NY and the six white sharks tagged in Nantucket, MA in 2016, there are now a total of 20 satellite-tagged white sharks of various life stages swimming around the North Atlantic; however, scientists need a larger sample size to have a complete understanding of the species' habitat usage. OCEARCH's mission is to enable data collection by providing collaborating researchers and institutions unprecedented access to mature marine animals. Up to 17 different researchers from 13 various institutions will receive biological samples from each animal tagged, allowing them to analyze the results from the blood, mucus, muscle, parasite, genetic, and other samples collected. Scientists will use these samples to conduct several studies, including understanding the sharks' reproductive condition. The expedition will include scientists from the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, Mote Marine Laboratory, University of North Florida, Adventure Aquarium, Georgia Aquarium, Georgia Southern, University of South Florida, University of South Carolina-Beaufort, WCS' New York Aquarium, University of Massachusetts, Cape Eleuthera Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Auburn University, and College of Charleston. All sharks will be fitted with a satellite transmitter tag, PSAT tag, and an acoustic tag. As the sharks' fins break the surface, the satellite tag will transmit their locations. You can follow the sharks tagged during Expedition Lowcountry by accessing the near-real time, free online Global Shark Tracker or by downloading the Global Shark Tracker App available for Apple and Android platforms. The expedition comes at an opportune time as OCEARCH announces a multi-year agreement with Southern Tide, a Greenville, SC-based lifestyle apparel brand that boasts exceptional craftsmanship and classic design. The brand will also spearhead wholesale opportunities to increase awareness for OCEARCH conservation efforts. "Southern Tide is thrilled to partner with OCEARCH and to support their important research," said Christopher Heyn, Southern Tide CEO. "Our connection to OCEARCH evolved organically; it is true to who we are as a brand, and our coastal roots. We could not be more pleased with this collaboration and are very excited that this upcoming expedition is happening in our backyard." About OCEARCH: OCEARCH is a recognized world leader in generating critical scientific data related to tracking (telemetry) and biological studies of keystone marine species such as great white and tiger sharks, in conjunction with conservation outreach and education at a measurable global scale. OCEARCH shares real-time migration data through OCEARCH's Global Shark Tracker -- In 2015, OCEARCH open-sourced the data on the Global Shark Tracker to over 15 million users. OCEARCH also inspires current and future generations of explorers, scientists, and stewards of the ocean through its STEM Learning Program. The free STEM Curriculum, available for grades K-8 and created in partnership with Landry's, Inc. enables students to learn STEM skills while following the real-time data on the movements of their favorite sharks. In partnership with Costa Sunglasses and YETI Coolers, the researchers OCEARCH supports work aboard the M/V OCEARCH, a 126' Cat-powered vessel equipped with a 75,000 lb. hydraulic research platform, where the ship serves as both mothership and at-sea laboratory. Scientists have approximately 15 minutes of access to live, mature sharks to conduct up to 12 studies. The sharks are measured, tissue and blood samples are collected, and satellite and acoustic transmitters are attached. Over 146 researchers from 80 regional and international institutions have partnered with OCEARCH. About Costa: As the leading manufacturer of the world's clearest polarized performance sunglasses, Costa offers superior lens technology and unparalleled fit and durability. Still handcrafted today in Florida, Costa has created the highest quality, best performing sunglasses for outdoor enthusiasts since 1983. For Costa, conservation is all about sustainable fishing. Many fisheries that should be vibrant and healthy are all but devoid of native fish because they have fallen victim to poor fishing practices, unregulated development, lack of watershed protection or all of the above. Costa works with partners around the world to help increase awareness and influence policy so that both the fish and fishermen of tomorrow will have healthy waters to enjoy. Costa encourages others to help in any way they can. About Southern Tide: Founded in 2006, Southern Tide is a Greenville, S.C.-based lifestyle apparel brand that boasts exceptional craftsmanship and classic design. Southern Tide is best known for its Skipjack Polo, deemed by many to be the finest, most comfortable polo shirt. In addition to the Skipjack Polo, Southern Tide offers a variety of apparel and accessory products. In 2013, the company was named to the Inc. 5,000 list for the third consecutive year and represented the fastest growing apparel company to make the list. Southern Tide is available for purchase in more than 850 specialty retailers and premium department stores in more than 45 states across the United States as well as online at www.southerntide.com. Southern Tide is a wholly owned subsidiary of Oxford Industries. ( : OXM)


Hyatt M.W.,Adventure Aquarium | Georoff T.A.,Philadelphia Zoo | Nollens H.H.,SeaWorld San Diego | Wells R.L.,Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine | Year: 2015

Aspergillosis is a common respiratory fungal disease in penguins managed under human care. Triazole antifungal drugs, including itraconazole, are most commonly used for treatment; however, itraconazole treatment failures from drug resistance are becoming more common, requiring newer treatment options. Voriconazole, a newer triazole, is being used more often. Until recently, no voriconazole pharmacokinetic studies had been performed in penguins, leading to empiric dosing based on other avian studies. This has led to increased anecdotal reporting of apparent voriconazole toxicity in penguins. This report describes 18 probable and 6 suspected cases of voriconazole toxicity in six penguin species from nine institutions: 12 African penguins (Spheniscus demersus), 5 Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti), 3 Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus), 2 gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua papua), 1 macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus), and 1 emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri). Observed clinical signs of toxicity included anorexia, lethargy, weakness, ataxia, paresis, apparent vision changes, seizure-like activity, and generalized seizures. Similar signs of toxicity have also been reported in humans, in whom voriconazole therapeutic plasma concentration for Aspergillus spp. infections is 2-6 μg/ml. Plasma voriconazole concentrations were measured in 18 samples from penguins showing clinical signs suggestive of voriconazole toxicity. The concentrations ranged from 8.12 to 64.17 μg/ml, with penguins having plasma concentrations above 30 μg/ml exhibiting moderate to severe neurologic signs, including ataxia, paresis, and seizures. These concentrations were well above those known to result in central nervous system toxicity, including encephalopathy, in humans. This case series highlights the importance of species-specific dosing of voriconazole in penguins and plasma therapeutic drug monitoring. Further investigation, including pharmacokinetic studies, is warranted. The authors recommend caution in determining voriconazole dosages for use in penguin species. © Copyright 2015 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.


Cray C.,University of Miami | Stremme D.W.,Adventure Aquarium | Arheart K.L.,University of Miami
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine | Year: 2010

In a clinical setting, it is important to differentiate abnormal values that may be a normal change resulting from feeding and those that may be disease related. Such postprandial changes have been identified in mammalian and avian species. In the current study, pre- and postvalues for several routine biochemical analytes from penguins (Spheniscus demersus) were examined. Significant increases were found in uric acid, triglycerides, and bile acids (P < 0.001). Uric acid levels increased more than threefold. These data indicate that postprandial changes should be considered when interpreting abnormal biochemistry values in penguins. © 2010 American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.

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