Advanced Veterinary Care Center

Hawthorne, CA, United States

Advanced Veterinary Care Center

Hawthorne, CA, United States
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PubMed | Advanced Veterinary Care Center and University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign
Type: | Journal: Veterinary medicine international | Year: 2014

This study sought to quantify in vitro antiproliferative effects of pamidronate in feline cancer cells and assess feasibility of use of pamidronate in cats by assessing short-term toxicity and dosing schedule in cats with bone-invasive cancer. A retrospective pilot study included eight cats with bone invasive cancer treated with intravenous pamidronate. In vitro, pamidronate reduced proliferation in feline cancer cells (P < 0.05). One cat treated with pamidronate in combination with chemotherapy and two cats treated with pamidronate as a single agent after failing prior therapy had subjective clinically stable disease; median progression free interval in these cats from initial pamidronate treatment was 81 days. Three cats developed azotemia while undergoing various treatment modalities including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and pamidronate. Median overall survival was 116.5 days for all cats and 170 days for cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Median progression free survival was 55 days for all cats and 71 days for cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Pamidronate therapy appears feasible for administration in cancer bearing cats with aggressive bone lesions in the dose range of 1-2mg/kg every 21-28 days for multiple treatments. No acute or short-term toxicity was directly attributable to pamidronate.


Song R.B.,University of Pennsylvania | Vite C.H.,University of Pennsylvania | Bradley C.W.,University of Pennsylvania | Cross J.R.,University of Pennsylvania | Cross J.R.,Advanced Veterinary Care Center
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine | Year: 2013

Background: Intracranial neoplasia of dogs is frequently encountered in veterinary medicine, but large-scale studies on prevalence are lacking. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of intracranial neoplasia in a large population of dogs examined postmortem and the relationship between breed, age, and weight with the presence of primary intracranial neoplasms. Animals: All dogs that underwent postmortem examination from 1986 through 2010 (n = 9,574), including dogs with a histopathologic diagnosis of primary (n = 227) and secondary (n = 208) intracranial neoplasia. Methods: Retrospective evaluation of medical records from 1986 through 2010. Results: Overall prevalence of intracranial neoplasia in this study's population of dogs was 4.5%. A statistically significant higher prevalence of primary intracranial neoplasms was found in dogs with increasing age and body weights. Dogs ≥15 kg had an increased risk of meningioma (odds ratio 2.3) when compared to dogs <15 kg. The Boxer, Boston Terrier, Golden Retriever, French Bulldog, and Rat Terrier had a significantly increased risk of primary intracranial neoplasms while the Cocker Spaniel and Doberman Pinscher showed a significantly decreased risk of primary intracranial neoplasms. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Intracranial neoplasia in dogs might be more common than previous estimates. The study suggests that primary intracranial neoplasia should be a strong differential in older and larger breed dogs presenting with signs of nontraumatic intracranial disease. Specific breeds have been identified with an increased risk, and others with a decreased risk of primary intracranial neoplasms. The results warrant future investigations into the role of age, size, genetics, and breed on the development of intracranial neoplasms. © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.


Murphy L.A.,Oradell Animal Hospital | Russell N.J.,Advanced Veterinary Care Center | Dulake M.I.,VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital | Nakamura R.K.,Veterinary Medical Surgical Group Orange County
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery | Year: 2014

A 4-year-old female spayed domestic longhair cat was referred for dyspnea. Further diagnostics revealed severe pleural effusion and a peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH). Following surgical correction of the PPDH the pleural effusion persisted. Re-check echocardiogram 4 weeks after initial evaluation revealed leftward deviation of the interventricular septum and interatrial septum occurring with inspiration. There were also exaggerated phasic changes in trans-tricuspid flow velocities suggestive of constrictive pericardial disease. Cardiac catheterization was performed and revealed elevated pressures in the right atrium and right ventricle. Constrictive pericarditis (CP) and epicarditis was confirmed at surgery, where subtotal pericardiectomy was performed with epicardial decortication. The cat continued to develop recurrent pleural effusion after surgery, although the volume and frequency of recurrence slowed over time. This is the first reported case of CP following PPDH repair in a cat. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.


Nakamura R.K.,Advanced Veterinary Care Center | Zimmerman S.A.,Advanced Veterinary Care Center | Lesser M.B.,Advanced Veterinary Care Center
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology | Year: 2011

A 4-year old female spayed domestic short hair cat presented for evaluation of a tachyarrhythmia identified on routine physical examination. Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) was identified on electrocardiogram (ECG). Echocardiogram failed to identify any structural heart disease. A positive Bartonella antibody titer was identified on serological evaluation. The cat received anti-arrhythmics for control of the SVT and azithromycin for Bartonella. After completion of antibiotic therapy, a four-fold decrease in the Bartonella antibody titer was measured and the cat was eventually weaned off anti-arrhythmic medications. At 1 week, 1 month and 3 month re-checks off all therapy, no SVT was identified. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Nakamura R.K.,Advanced Veterinary Care Center
Compendium (Yardley, PA) | Year: 2012

Nosocomial infections (NIs) are infections acquired during hospitalization. They are characterized by a high incidence of antimicrobial resistance. The most common NIs are pneumonia and urinary tract, surgical site, and bloodstream infections. Hand hygiene has demonstrated efficacy in reducing NIs.


Nakamura R.K.,Advanced Veterinary Care Center | Zimmerman S.A.,Advanced Veterinary Care Center | Lange A.J.,Advanced Veterinary Care Center | Lesser M.B.,Advanced Veterinary Care Center
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology | Year: 2012

A 4-year-old male castrated Borzoi dog presented on referral for evaluation of pleural effusion, ventricular arrhythmias, and suspected dilated cardiomyopathy. Echocardiogram identified several masses along the chordae tendineae, as well as a long the annulus of the mitral valve. A blood culture was positive for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis. The dog was also positive for Bartonella DNA on PCR testing. Aggressive antibiotic therapy was instituted. However, the dog continued to have recurrent pleural effusion and progressive azotemia. The dog was euthanized 39 days after diagnosis. Necropsy confirmed the presence of intracardiac abscesses, thrombosis and endocarditis. S. lugdunensis is a recently identified rare cause of endocarditis in humans characterized by intracardiac abscess formation, highly destructive valvular lesions preferentially affecting the mitral valve and a high mortality rate. This is the first reported case of S. lugdunensis isolation in a dog with endocarditis. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Nakamura R.K.,Advanced Veterinary Care Center
Compendium (Yardley, PA) | Year: 2012

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection is currently the most common skin infection identified in human emergency rooms, and the development of methicillin resistance is increasing in veterinary medicine. This article reviews the current knowledge about methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus infections in human medicine as well as the limited information available in veterinary medicine, including options for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.


PubMed | Advanced Veterinary Care Center
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Journal of veterinary emergency and critical care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) | Year: 2013

To describe a case of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT) after massive Africanized bee envenomation in a dog.While boarding at a kennel, a dog was stung by approximately 300 Africanized bees. During initial veterinary examination, the dog was deemed to be in shock, characterized by collapse, with hypotension, bradycardia, and hypoglycemia. In addition, severe diffuse erythema and edema were noted over the entire body. Supportive care, including IV crystalloid and colloid fluids, dextrose, fresh frozen plasma, oxygen therapy, broad spectrum antimicrobials, dexamethasone, and diphenhydramine was initiated. The dogs condition stabilized over the next 2 days. Forty-eight hours after admission the dog developed hematemesis and hematochezia, and severe thrombocytopenia was identified. Extensive diagnostic investigation revealed no likely trigger other than the Africianized bee exposure, and a diagnosis of IMT was made. Following a red blood cell transfusion and immunosuppressive doses of dexamethasone and gastroprotectant therapy, the dogs condition stabilized, and the platelet count returned to normal after 7 days from initiation of therapy.IMT is a possible sequelae of massive Africanized bee envenomation in the dog.


PubMed | Advanced Veterinary Care Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of veterinary emergency and critical care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) | Year: 2015

To describe the complications and frequency of thrombosis associated with the use of enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin, in dogs with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA).Retrospective case series.Two privately owned veterinary referral hospitals.Twenty-one client-owned dogs with primary IMHA.Dogs were treated with enoxaparin (0.8 mg/kg subcutaneously every 6 h) as the sole anticoagulation therapy starting at admission to the hospital.Only 2 dogs had minor hemorrhagic complications associated with enoxaparin therapy. Frequency of thrombosis was not assessed. Long-term survival was comparable to other anticoagulation protocols reported for dogs with primary IMHA.The use of enoxaparin was safe in a small group of dogs with primary IMHA. Whether enoxaparin therapy can reduce mortality and thrombotic complications in dogs with primary IMHA compared with other anticoagulation protocols remains unknown.


PubMed | Advanced Veterinary Care Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Veterinary surgery : VS | Year: 2014

To compare laparoscopic gastropexy using 2 self-anchoring barbed sutures to gastropexy using laparoscopically tied intracorporeal knots.Prospective, randomized controlled, clinical trial.Dogs (n=30) weighing >16kg.Dogs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 laparoscopic gastropexy groups: group 1 (controls), intracorporeal 2-0 polydioxanone sutures (PDSII, Ethicon); group 2, barbed suture (0 Quill PDO; Angiotech); and group 3, barbed suture (2-0 V-Loc 180; Covidien). Gastropexy suturing time (GST) and total surgery time (TST) were recorded for each dog. Complications were recorded. Each dog was examined by ultrasound (1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively) to ensure persistence of the gastropexy. One dog each in group 2 and group 3 had 2nd look laparoscopy to evaluate the gastropexy.All gastropexies were intact at 6 months. Mean GST was significantly longer for group 1 (36minutes; range, 25-46minutes) than for groups 2 (20minutes; range, 16-37minutes) and 3 (19minutes; range, 15-30minutes; P<.05), which were not significantly different from each other. Likewise TSTs for groups 2 and 3 were significantly shorter than for group 1 (P<.05).Barbed sutures (Quill and V-Loc) allowed for effective intracorporeal laparoscopic suturing of an incisional gastropexy without tying intracorporeal knots.

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