Sunnyvale, CA, United States

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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.99K | Year: 2015

Towing of a Magnetic Anomaly Detection (MAD) system is an important aspect of rotorcraft maritime operation in support of Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW). The vibratory rotary wing platform combined with the long and flexible towing cable, the low mass ratio of the towed body to the total mass (the sum of the tow body and the towing aircraft), and the rotor downwash impingement on the towed body during deployment presents a challenging task for integration of a modern towed MAD system on USN airborne ASW platforms. Phase I of the proposed research emphasizes towing simulation methodology research and development. Phase I will also carry out a full flight simulation with a towed body to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed simulation method. Overall, Phase I will accomplish (1) the development of a high fidelity aircraft simulation model for accurately capturing both the steady state performance and the vibratory characteristics of the towing operation; (2) the development of a state-of-the-art model for the interference of the towing aircraft rotor wake on the towed body; (3) the development of high fidelity dynamics and aerodynamics modelling of the towing system including the towing cable, the towed body, and the cable attachment device; (4) the performance of a full flight simulation with the integrated towing aircraft and towing system; (5) the performance of initial parametric studies to investigate the towed body aerodynamic and dynamic characteristics including the effects of body geometry, size, mass/inertia/CG, aerodynamic stabilizing surfaces, etc.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2015

Rotorcraft experience inherently complex aerodynamic interactions between the rotors, fuselage, and empennage. To overcome insufficient speed, range, and payloads of existing rotorcraft, Future Vertical Lift (FVL) design considers configurations that may have multiple main rotors, ducted fans, auxiliary wings, etc. Such FVL configurations introduce additional aerodynamic lifting devices that make aerodynamic interaction an even more dominant factor to consider. The proposed research aims at developing an advanced modelling method dedicated to interactional aerodynamics analysis in support of modern rotorcraft design and development. Phase I will accomplish a modular formulation of the coupled viscous vortex particle method with a near-body solver for full rotorcraft analysis. Phase I will also accomplish the development of the software architecture and framework for coupling VPM with near-body solvers (CFD, etc.) and comprehensive codes (CSD). The feasibility of the proposed approach will be demonstrated through an aerodynamic interaction analysis of a compound rotorcraft.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2015

Most existing finite state inflow models that are widely used in flight dynamics simulation are limited to only modeling single main rotor helicopters. Modern advanced rotorcraft configurations usually involve multiple main rotors (e.g., co-axial, tilt-rotor, etc.), ducted fans, auxiliary wings, etc.. Advances in rotor inflow modeling are needed to extend the current modeling capability to provide effective support for the design and development of advanced rotorcraft configurations. An innovative approach is proposed to develop an accurate formulation of a finite state rotor inflow solution for advanced rotorcraft configurations that is well suited for flight dynamics and control applications. The innovative methodology and implementation algorithms will be thoroughly described and tested. The feasibility of the proposed solution will be demonstrated and validated with examples in both the time and frequency domains.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.81K | Year: 2015

Most existing finite state inflow models that are widely used in flight dynamics simulation are limited to only modeling single main rotor helicopters. Modern advanced rotorcraft configurations usually involve multiple main rotors (e.g., co-axial, tilt-rotor, etc.), ducted fans, auxiliary wings, etc.. Advances in rotor inflow modeling are needed to extend the current modeling capability to provide effective support for the design and development of advanced rotorcraft configurations. An innovative approach is proposed to develop an accurate formulation of a finite state rotor inflow solution for advanced rotorcraft configurations that is well suited for flight dynamics and control applications. The innovative methodology and implementation algorithms will be thoroughly described and tested. The feasibility of the proposed solution will be demonstrated and validated with examples in both the time and frequency domains.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2016

Helicopter buffeting is an aeroelastic problem, with mutually interacting airloads and structural motions from the rotor, hub, fuselage, and empennage. Buffeting is amenable to the state-of-the-art analysis technology and addressing it is long overdue. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) provides the highest fidelity for the fluid physics while Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) provides accurate elastic structure modeling. Combined, CFD/CSD coupled analysis is essential to representing the mutually dependent aeroelastic interactions associated with buffeting. However, current coupling implementations are limited to rotors and wings, while the fuselage and empennage structures critical to the prediction of buffeting are rigidly modeled. An opportunity exists to address this problem by expanding CFD/CSD coupled analysis technology to include the aeroelastic coupling of fuselage and empennage. This effort leverages existing technology for CSD by utilizing the Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System (RCAS) and CFD by utilizing OVERFLOW and Create-AV Helios to focus development on the fluid structure interface (FSI). The main requirements of which are the accurate transfer of deformations to CFD and energy conservation during the application of aerodynamic forces to CSD. Although this development targets interfacing CFD with RCAS, the developed FSI will be general and made available for integration into other structural dynamics programs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 779.98K | Year: 2012

Flight simulation provides a cost effective tool for testing aircraft systems. Testing avionics systems across a particular flight profile requires driving the simulation through the flight profile to generate the required simulated sensor data. Testing avionics systems with a human pilot is costly and it cannot provide precise repeatability, which is essential to evaluating the effect of mission parameters on aircraft survivability. However, a"virtual pilot"is capable of generating a repeatable control, which guarantees an identical flight every time. Development of a virtual pilot that can address a range of maneuvers and which can be adapted to various aircraft configurations is a demanding task. Most current methods are not feasible for use by application Test Engineers since those methods require manual tuning of the virtual pilot for each configuration and for each maneuver. Under this SBIR, ART proposes to develop a virtual pilot control generation tool that can accomplish the task effectively. The problems of accuracy, robustness, and efficiency will be addressed using the advanced inverse simulation technique, the mathematical optimization method, a feedback compensator, and parallel computing. A graphical user interface will be developed in order to facilitate the tool usage. The innovation involved is the integration of the diverse technologies of rotorcraft modeling, inverse simulation, and optimization into a unified tool that is efficient and effective in providing a repeatable control history to drive nonlinear rotorcraft models through user defined flight profiles.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 729.90K | Year: 2011

Modeling engine and drivetrain (i.e., propulsion system) dynamics and control is a vital part of modern rotorcraft simulation as they are closely coupled with the rotor dynamics and impact the aircraft performance and transient response. The current engine modeling method for real time rotorcraft simulation relies heavily on empirical estimation and, hence, is severely limited by the availability of the data and also suffers from an inaccuracy in predicting the engine/drivetrain transient states. The proposed SBIR is dedicated to the development of a first principle based engine and drivetrain dynamics and control modeling method that will reflect rotorcraft propulsion system physics and provide an accurate simulation solution. The proposed solution will be rigorously formulated and applicable for generic turboshaft engine/drivetrain modeling. The formulation will consider the entire engine operational range including start-up, idle, started, and shut-down. The simulation implementation will also address the interaction with the engine fuel control dynamics and the drivetrain/rotor coupling for a fully integrated solution. The engine dynamic model will be developed in modular form so that it can be easily integrated with rotorcraft flight simulation programs or used as a standalone model as a plug-in in any analysis program in support of engine dynamics and engine control analysis. The physics-based solution thus developed will be tested and evaluated in an industry standard rotorcraft modeling and simulation program to validate the methodology in support of rotorcraft analysis and flight simulation.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: There is a need to utilize mobile computation devices to extend flight training from centralized facilities to remote field stations. Current limitations in the computational capabilities of mobile computing devices require that the software be partitioned between a more powerful centrally located host and the mobile computing devices. This requires simulation software that supports flight training applications to be modular and scalable to take advantage of a distributed architecture. Advanced Rotorcraft Technology,Inc.(ART) has pioneered the development of modular, scalable simulation software to support reconfigurable simulator applications. ART"s existing Boeing 737-800NG avionics training simulator can be adapted to utilizing a remote mobile computer for the instrument displays and pilot inputs, providing a convenient prototyping system to evaluate software and hardware architectures for mobile computer training applications in Phase I. A trainee at a remote facility with a mobile computing device can then select any display or switch panel from a cockpit overview and render a full size image on the touch screen to exercise procedural training with that display. In addition, ART"s authoring tool supports embedding interactive displays and switches with the training tutorial, allowing a remote student access to interactive training from a tutorial on the mobile computing device. Under Phase I, potential architectures for a variety of training applications for mobile computing devices will be examined, including weapon system training, maintenance training, and collective mission training using a distributed simulation communications protocol. BENEFIT: Extending effective training simulation to mobile computing devices can tremendously expedite training, allowing centrally located computers and instructors to support students in the field with a mobile computing device. ART can provide a central computing facility for downloading required applications to support the training exercises. Simulation software can be purchased, leased, or accessed on a"time-required"basis as a business model. The modular, scalable design of the simulation software will also enable the configuration of multiple mobile devices into training devices with varying levels of sophistication to support a wide range of training applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2012

There is a need in the wind industry for a comprehensive analysis code that is tailored to wind turbine analysis, intuitive to use, fast, accurate, and scalable. Advanced Rotorcraft Technology, Inc. (ART) would like to fulfill this need by adapting its industry leading comprehensive helicopter analysis codes for wind turbine analysis. The end product would be Wind Turbine Comprehensive Analysis Software (WTCAS) and would be dedicated to the modeling and analysis of wind turbine systems. ART has supported the helicopter industry with comprehensive analysis codes and consulting since 1982. ART is especially well suited for this task because of its flagship finite element comprehensive analysis products, RCAS and FLIGHTLAB. These software products provide the helicopter industry with turnkey analysis programs that are fast, accurate, extremely scalable, and intuitive to use. ART would leverage this existing software to create WTCAS by reusing their software architecture and analysis methodology, and adapting their structural and aerodynamic element libraries for improved applicability to wind turbine applications. Adapting ART & apos;s existing comprehensive analysis codes will enable fast and cost-effective development of WTCAS and allow much of this SBIR to focus on enhancement of WTCAS for modeling and analysis issues specific to wind turbines. At the end of Phase I, ART will have developed and demonstrated an initial implementation of WTCAS. This implementation of WTCAS will be capable of performing a wide variety of analyses and form a strong basis for Phase II development by tangibly demonstrating its advantages over the current generation of analysis tools. The objective of Phase II will be to create a market ready version of the Wind Turbine Comprehensive Analysis System and provide a superior comprehensive analysis alternative to today & apos;s analysis tools. During Phase II, this project will focus on expanding WTCAS scalability, usability, and flexibility. A benchmark WTCAS-CFD coupling analysis using high fidelity 2-D shell elements will be performed and validated and utilities to facilitate the process of coupling CFD with WTCAS will be developed. A high performance computing scheme for WTCAS-CFD coupling will be implemented to reduce the benchmark WTCAS-CFD coupling analysis run-time. Additionally, a variety of WTCAS analysis utility functions will be added including moving block FFT and harmonic analysis. Unfortunately, the current generation of wind turbine analysis tools has not kept pace with the rapid development of the industry and does not satisfy today & apos;s analysis needs. The primary issue with the current set of analysis tools is that there is no comprehensive option available that computes the coupled aerodynamics and structural dynamics of a model. This limitation forces the user to perform the error prone and unnecessary task of coupling (at least) two independent codes when running an aero-elastic analysis. While no comprehensive analysis option currently exists in the wind turbine industry, the helicopter industry has developed several comprehensive analysis programs that fulfill the majority of wind industry needs. Helicopter and wind turbine analysis is fundamentally similar as both systems require advanced aerodynamic modeling and include a rotor, non-rotating structure (fuselage or tower), and drivetrain. Advanced Rotorcraft Technology plans to leverage its expertise and existing comprehensive helicopter analysis programs to develop the Wind Turbine Comprehensive Analysis System (WTCAS). Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: WTCAS will greatly enhance the capability with which wind turbine designers, manufacturers, and researchers can setup and analyze complete aero-elastic modeling problems. This will allow the wind turbine industry to focus more on, and better analyze, novel wind turbine designs that improve performance and reliability, reduce acoustic noise, and lower maintenance costs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.97K | Year: 2016

Towing of a Magnetic Anomaly Detection (MAD) system is an important aspect of rotorcraftmaritime operation. The oscillatory rotorcraft combined with the long and flexible towingcable, the low mass ratio of the towed body to the towing aircraft, and the rotor wake effecton the towed body presents a challenge for integration of a modern MAD system withrotorcraft platform. The research objective is to develop a high fidelity coupled rotorcraft and towing system simulation methodology to support the design of a stable towed body to carry MAD sensors. The integration goal is to maintain a stable towed body attitude and altitude change as required for the towing. The development of a high fidelity flight simulation tool to accurately model the towing system to satisfy both towing stability and safety as required for the towing operation. The proposed Phase II research will emphasize: (a) the enhancement andvalidation of the towing simulation methodology as initially formulated and tested in Phase I, (b) the design and analysis of a towing system to satisfy both towing stability and safety as required, and (c) high fidelity full flight simulation models of USN for supporting towing applications.

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