White Bear Lake, MN, United States

Advanced Research Corp.

www.arcnano.com
White Bear Lake, MN, United States
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Patent
Advanced Research Corp. | Date: 2016-10-31

Various systems, devices and methods are provided for interconnection between wafers and/or chips using catch flexures. In one example, among others, a catch flexure assembly includes a first interconnect affixed to a first wafer. The first interconnect can include a female opening at a distal end of a flexible member that is configured to receive a male extension of a second interconnect affixed to a second wafer when the first wafer is aligned with the second wafer, and retain the male extension during a bonding process of the first and second flexible interconnects. The catch flexure assembly can also include bonding material disposed adjacent to the female opening, which is configured to secure the male extension in the female opening during the bonding process.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.90K | Year: 2016

This proposal addresses a pressing need in the detector development community within experimental high energy physics (HEP). The HEP community has been involved in the development of highly segmented and miniaturized detection elements ever since silicon strip detectors were first invented in the late 1970s. Various experiments have employed silicon detectors in a variety of readout configurations, such as silicon drift detectors, charge-coupled devices, hybrid pixel detectors, silicon-based calorimeters, and even trackers in satellites. The high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) has raised a new challenge for the technology: the future of HEP lies in development of increasingly complex detectors with resident intelligence, e.g., trackers with Level-1 trigger, pixel detectors with even finer segmentation, and calorimeters involving a massive increase in scale. Furthermore, these detectors will all need to be hardened against the unprecedented levels of radiation dosage expected at the HL-LHC. Continued expansion in scale, density, complexity, and radiation hardness of silicon-based detectors requires concurrent development of technologies that enable interconnections between detector elements, readout electronics and data acquisition systems. In some sense, the interconnection capabilities are partly driving the innovations in detector design and inspiring bold triggering concepts. Moreover, these designs require layers of novel materials whose thermal, mechanical and radiation tolerance properties need to be studied independently and also within assemblies that include the interfaces. Advance Research Corp. (ARC) has been a leader in the development of technologies involved in hybridization, the process which provides interconnection between sensors and corresponding readout integrated circuits (ROICs). They offer a multitude of solutions aimed at particular problems requiring hybridization. Prof. Tripathi at UC Davis has been involved with silicon detectors since the early 1980s and has worked on several HEP detectors, especially in the areas of readout electronics and detector fabrication using interconnect techniques. Prof. Thom at Cornell is an expert in the technical needs of the CMS tracker in the HL-LHC era, and is emerging as a leader in the management structure of the pixel project. A major strength of our team is the perfect combination of engineering provided by ARC and the expertise in HEP detectors brought by the academic faculty. The issue present in the HL-LHC and other HEP experiments, is not the bump size and pitch, but rather the issue of Dielectric Breakdown. During operation, due to radiation damage, the ROIC chip needs to supply the sensor with upwards of 500-600V. The issue, is that at these potential differences, the ROIC will short to the sensor. In order to prevent shorting, the interconnects need to be surrounded by a dielectric with sufficient breakdown strength after irradiation. The fundamental problem of this STTR is the “radiation Hardness” of the necessary material structures and how the material electrical and mechanical properties evolve after radiation exposure. This is the first order problem which must be addressed, both for the near and far term needs of the HEP community. The detailed work plan for this effort, is to test and quantify a material set for application to both the near and far term needs of the high energy beam lines with regard to Silicon detectors.


Miyawaki A.,Advanced Research Corp. | Miyawaki A.,RIKEN
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology | Year: 2011

Proteins are always on the move, and this may occur through diffusion or active transport. The realization that the regulation of signal transduction is highly dynamic in space and time has stimulated intense interest in the movement of proteins. Over the past decade, numerous new technologies using fluorescent proteins have been developed, allowing us to observe the spatiotemporal dynamics of proteins in living cells. These technologies have greatly advanced our understanding of protein dynamics, including protein movement and protein interactions. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Patent
Advanced Research Corp. | Date: 2015-07-22

A vehicle ground collision prevention method involves acquiring a geometric profile of a road feature, the geometric profile defining a shape of the upper surface of the road feature, acquiring wheel diameters and inter-axle distances for a vehicle, generating an interference boundary based on the road feature geometric profile, wheel diameters and inter-axle distances, where the interference boundary is an upper envelope bounding the trajectories of all points on the road feature geometric profile as observed in a vehicle-fixed reference frame as the vehicle passes over the road feature, acquiring an underbody profile of the vehicle, the underbody profile defining the shape of the lower surface of the vehicle, calculating a ground clearance curve for the vehicle-road feature pair by comparing the underbody profile with the interference curve, determining a minimum ground clearance over the ground clearance curve, and providing information regarding the minimum ground clearance to the vehicles driver.


Patent
West Virginia University and Advanced Research Corp. | Date: 2015-04-21

Various examples are provided for collimator assemblies and/or energy analyzer arrays of plasma spectrometers. In one example, among others, an ultra-compact plasma spectrometer includes a collimator assembly; an energy analyzer array that receives charged particles from the collimator; and a detector plate that detects charged particles exiting the energy analyzer array. The energy analyzer array can include a plurality of analyzer plates having distinct energy channels. In another example, a method includes bonding a stack of analyzer plates to form an energy analyzer array, affixing a collimator assembly to the entrance surface of the energy analyzer array, and affixing an array of detectors to the exit surface of the energy analyzer array. The analyzer plates include energy analyzer bands extending from the entrance surface to the exit surface. The aperture arrays and the detectors can align with the energy analyzer bands.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

As magnetically confined plasmas progress towards ignition and very long pulse experiments, the physics of the pedestal and divertor regions has become increasingly important. There is a critical need for comprehensive measurements in boundary layer plasmas and the importance of such measurements to the improvement of predictive numerical simulations. The focus of this proposal is the direct, spatially resolved, measurement of the energy spectra of ions in the edge of a plasma using in-situ probes that are easily replaced and require minimal resources. This will be accomplished by the development of a Micro Scale Ion Spectrometer. In the Phase I research, a proof of concept device will be fabricated and tested. This device will be constructed of sensing elements of the same size as a fully functional device and hence provide a very high degree of confidence in the applicability of this instrument. The benefits of a successful completion of Phase I and Phase II are significant in that the resulting sensor and instrument of a new Micro Ion Spectrometer which will exhibit extremely small size and low power consumption and which can be positioned and manipulated easily inside sealed chambers such as plasma and related vacuum process chambers. The MIS sensor has the potential to play a useful role in fundamental physic plasma research such as in fusion plasma devices and in the broader community of plasma physics and chemistry research at national research laboratories, private industry, and universities. The extended commercial applications include the gamut of plasma processes as used in semiconductor manufacturing technologies. It is thought that all plasma processing equipment are a potential site for on-board OEM packages of the MIS that could fulfill the need for real time in-situ plasma sensing. Future developments of the sensor will be that of a Micro Mass Spectrometer. The extension to semiconductor device processing will help create semiconductor structures that will lead to new and novel devices. In space based applications, such as being a part of the instrumentation package for CubeSats and other micro-satellites, the new device can be used to yield new information about energetic charged particles ion the heliosphere and magnetosphere and thereby support the expanding field of space weather research. Early warnings of space weather events are critically needed for space-based communications infrastructure and ground-based electrical distribution networks.


Grant
Agency: Department of Commerce | Branch: National Institute of Standards and Technology | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.33K | Year: 2015

This project focuses on developing a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent that may increase the detection of tagged cells by a factor of 10-100. The ability to noninvasively track specifically labeled (tagged) cells, enables a researcher or medical treatment professional to dynamically monitor the delivery and targeted application of medicinal and bio-reactive agents.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 495.30K | Year: 2016

Launch and recovery (L&R) of manned and unmanned systems from ships is very challenging. As Sea State increases, the reliability of most existing L&R systems such as conventional cranes and davits will deteriorates. ATR Corporation developed an innovative L&R system conceptual design during the SBIR Phase I. The L&R system has been analyzed to be feasible to launch and recover both surface craft, such as RHIBs and MK-105 sled, and underwater vehicles, such as the SDV and RMMV from the Afloat Forward Staging Base (AFSB). In this SBIR Phase II, the L&R system will be further analyzed by seakeeping analysis, dynamics simulation, finite element modeling, and scaled prototype testing in simulated wave environments in up to Sea State 4. The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) will be gradually raised to TRL 5/6 at the end of Phase II. With the ability to reliably launch and recover mission vehicles in high sea conditions, the L&R system would have clear benefits for mine warfare and special operations. In addition, the L&R technology developed for the AFSB could have applicability to other ships in the Navy and other organizations both in the military and in industry.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.93K | Year: 2015

ATR proposes further development of a Robotic Mission Module Handling System (RMMHS) in the SBIR Phase II to provide a highly adaptable and mobile handling device that is common to both LCS seaframes. The RMMHS consists of a team of robots which work together to handle Mission Modules (MMs). This modular approach takes advantage of the structural strength of the TEU or flat rack to eliminate excess equipment weight while minimizing the deck space taken up by the handling system when not in use. The small size of the RMMHS allows the operator to address and transfer a MM from any deck arrangement with minimal clearance between neighboring modules or ship structure. The intuitive remote control operation of the RMMHS is expected to reduce crew training requirements. The RMMHS is also more cost-effective to operate compared to the existing material handling equipment on both LCS seaframes. A technology demonstration prototype of the RMMHS will be developed and tested in laboratory environments during the SBIR Phase II to achieve TRL 5.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.77K | Year: 2015

The overall goal of this Phase II project is to develop a motion compensating platform (MCP) technology for the 32MJ Electromagnetic (EM) railgun aboard the Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV). Ship motion for the catamaran is significantly different from a monohull such as the DDG 51. Both its peak linear and peak angular accelerations will be higher than those for a monohull in high sea conditions. Because the current turret train and elevating actuators of the railgun are not designed to accommodate the higher accelerations and higher frequency contents in the ship motions of the JHSV, the Navy has desired to mount the railgun on an MCP so that the turret train and elevating actuators can function as designed. Specific design objective of the MCP includes reducing the linear accelerations by at least 50%. The MCP will also reduce the higher frequency contents to make them similar to those of an uncompensated monohull. A technology demonstrator of the MCP will be developed and tested using a fire control radar as its payload aboard the JHSV in the summer of 2016. The developed MCP technology is scalable for much larger payload should a requirement for supplemental railgun stabilization emerge.

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