Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Katsumata Y.,Tokyo Womens Medical University | Kawaguchi Y.,Tokyo Womens Medical University | Baba S.,Tokyo Womens Medical University | Hattori S.,Tokyo Medical University | And 10 more authors.
Modern Rheumatology | Year: 2013

Objectives: We assessed the association between serum autoantibodies against the 70-kDa polypeptide of the U1-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex (U1-70k) and the central nervous system (CNS) syndromes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Methods: We studied 106 hospitalized patients with active SLE, comparing those with (n = 32) and without (n = 74) CNS syndromes. CNS syndromes were further classified into neurologic (n = 21) and psychiatric (n = 15) disorders. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-U1-70k antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant antigens. IgG antibodies against whole U1-RNP were measured using commercial ELISA kits. Results: Although there was no significant difference in the levels of serum anti-U1-70k antibodies in SLE patients with or without CNS syndromes (p = 0.83), the levels were significantly elevated in SLE patients compared with patients without psychiatric syndromes (p = 0.030). In contrast, no significant difference was observed in the levels of serum anti-U1-RNP antibodies in SLE patients with or without psychiatric syndromes (p = 0.555). Conclusions: These results indicate that serum anti-U1-70k antibodies are associated with psychiatric syndromes in SLE but that they are not associated with CNS syndromes as a whole or with neurologic syndromes. The anti-U1-70k antibodies might be involved in the pathological mechanisms of psychiatric syndromes in SLE. © 2012 Japan College of Rheumatology. Source


Katsumata Y.,Tokyo Womens Medical University | Kawaguchi Y.,Tokyo Womens Medical University | Baba S.,Tokyo Womens Medical University | Hattori S.,Tokyo Medical University | And 11 more authors.
Molecular and Cellular Proteomics | Year: 2011

Our objective was to identify new serum autoantibodies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), focusing on those found in patients with central nervous system (CNS) syndromes. Autoantigens in human brain proteins were screened by multiple proteomic analyses: two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/Western blots followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis and immunoprecipitation followed by liquid chromatographytandem mass spectrometry shotgun analysis. The presence of serum IgG autoantibodies against 11 selected recombinant antigens was assessed by Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the sera of 106 SLE patients and 100 normal healthy controls. The O.D. values in sera from SLE patients were significantly higher than those of controls for the antigens crystallin αB (p = 0.0002), esterase D (p = 0.0002), APEX nuclease 1 (p < 0.0001), ribosomal protein P0 (p < 0.0001), and PA28γ (p = 0.0005); the first three are newly reported. The anti-esterase D antibody levels were significantly higher in the CNS group than in the non-CNS group (p = 0.016). Moreover, when the SLE patients were categorized using CNS manifestations indicating neurologic or psychiatric disorders, the anti-APEX nuclease 1 antibody levels were significantly elevated in SLE patients with psychiatric disorders (p = 0.037). In conclusion, the association of SLE with several new and previously reported autoantibodies has been demonstrated. Statistically significant associations between anti-esterase D antibodies and CNS syndromes as well as between anti-APEX nuclease 1 antibodies and psychiatric disorders in SLE were also demonstrated. The combined immunoproteomic approaches used in this study are reliable and effective methods for identifying SLE autoantigens. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc. Source

Discover hidden collaborations