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Chao R.,Advanced Linear Devices
Electronic Products | Year: 2012

An ultra-low-voltage (LV) booster module is added to present generation of energy-harvesting (EH) modules to boost the sources' power output to a level high enough to drive the modules. This module is capable of utilizing ultra-low-power sources with outputs as low as 40 mV and 2W. This device enables many of the formerly aloof waste or scavenged sources such as single cell photovoltaic, piezoelectric, ambient radiation, thermoelectric generators (TEG), biomechanical sources, radio frequency (RF) and embedded systems to be utilized as feasible power sources. The device is very scalable, and so it can be configured to provide energy for all levels of EH applications. The new single-component EH modules also reduce the need to cascade large numbers of junctions.


Chao B.,Advanced Linear Devices
Electronic Products | Year: 2012

Low-voltage booster modules (LVBM) is designed to boost the ultralow voltages of the sources mentioned above, as well as other ultra-low-output devices. The module will boost the source's native voltage or power output and produce an output capable of supplying the higher input threshold voltages required by EH (energy harvesting) modules. In the case where there is both a drop-in module and a component kit, one argument for design-in of the LVBM generally relates to the complexity of the device design itself, and the complexity of the design-in circuit. In most cases, if the product design is very complex or needs to have tolerances precisely controlled, it is more likely that the manufacturer will want to control all of the component parameters. The LVBM has a two-wire input and a two-wire output. All the product manufacturer really needs to know to integrate it is the device's power requirements and the I/O impedances.


Chao R.L.,Advanced Linear Devices
Electronic Products | Year: 2013

Significant innovations in precision circuit semiconductors are driving advancements in the fields of energy harvesting, sensor networks, building automation, and security systems. The precision semiconductor technology delivers improved system sensitivity, reliability, stability, and functionality for all these system categories. Building automation demonstrates how advances in semiconductor technology enable new capabilities in these systems. Operators of large facilities, such as office buildings and municipal complexes have been able to cut costs and improve energy efficiency by using building automation and security along with energy-harvesting systems and wireless sensor networks. Large office complexes use sensor networks to interface with building controls to turn on power, heating, and ventilation individual offices and cubicles only when people are present.


Energy-harvesting technology has evolved to capture accumulate, store, and manage the energy available from low-state energy sources. Modern commercial photovoltaic technology was developed in the United States in 1954 when Daryl Chapin, Calvin Fuller, and Gerald Pearson developed the first commercially producible silicon photovoltaic (PV) cell at Bell Labs. In the early 1970's, Dr. Elliot Berman, backed by Exxon Corporation, designed a significantly less costly solar cell. Today, human breath is capable of being harvested as a power source a far cry from the trade winds that powered early man to the far corners of the world. The most renowned utilization of windmills is the fabled Dutch windmill innovation that allowed them to drain lakes and rivers in Europe's Rhine river delta. The ability to reduce the power requirements of portable devices by orders of magnitude has made formerly unthinkable waste energy sources realistic for the next generation of portable and remote devices.

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