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News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: phys.org

For robots, it's all in the gears. Gears are essential for precision robotics. They allow limbs to turn smoothly and stop on command; low-quality gears cause limbs to jerk or shake. If you're designing a robot to scoop samples or grip a ledge, the kind of gears you'll need won't come from a hardware store. At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, technologist Douglas Hofmann and his collaborators are building a better gear. Hofmann is the lead author of two recent papers on gears made from bulk metallic glass (BMG), a specially crafted alloy with properties that make it ideal for robotics. "Although BMGs have been explored for a long time, understanding how to design and implement them into structural hardware has proven elusive," said Hofmann. "Our team of researchers and engineers at JPL, in collaboration with groups at Caltech and UC San Diego, have finally put BMGs through the necessary testing to demonstrate their potential benefits for NASA spacecraft. These materials may be able to offer us solutions for mobility in harsh environments, like on Jupiter's moon Europa." How can this mystery material be both a metal and a glass? The secret is in its atomic structure. Metals have an organized, crystalline arrangement. But if you heat them up into a liquid, they melt and the atoms become randomized. Cool them rapidly enough —about 1,832 degrees Fahrenheit (1,000 degrees Celsius) per second—and you can trap their non-crystalline, "liquid" form in place. This produces a random arrangement of atoms with an amorphous, or non-crystalline microstructure. That structure gives these materials their common names: "amorphous metals," or metallic glass. By virtue of being cooled so rapidly, the material is technically a glass. It can flow easily and be blow-molded when heated, just like windowpane glass. When this glassy material is produced in parts greater than about four tenths of an inch (1 millimeter), it's called "bulk" metallic glass, or BMG. Metallic glasses were originally developed at Caltech in Pasadena, California, in 1960. Since then, they've been used to manufacture everything from cellphones to golf clubs. What makes these gears perfect for space? Among their attractive qualities, BMGs have low melting temperatures. That allows parts to be cast using injection-molding technology, similar to what's used in the plastics industry, but with much higher strength and wear-resistance. BMGs also don't get brittle in extreme cold, a factor which can lead to a gear's teeth fracturing. This last quality makes the material particularly useful for the kinds of robotics done at JPL. Hofmann said that gears made from BMGs can "run cold and dry": initial testing has demonstrated strong torque and smooth turning without lubricant, even at -328 degrees Fahrenheit (-200 degrees Celsius). For robots sent to frozen landscapes, that can be a power-saving advantage. NASA's Mars Curiosity rover, for example, expends energy heating up grease lubricant every time it needs to move. "Being able to operate gears at the low temperature of icy moons, like Europa, is a potential game changer for scientists," said R. Peter Dillon, a technologist and program manager in JPL's Materials Development and Manufacturing Technology Group. "Power no longer needs to be siphoned away from the science instruments for heating gearbox lubricant, which preserves precious battery power." The second paper led by Hofmann looked at how BMGs could lower the cost of manufacturing strain wave gears. This type of gear, which includes a metal ring that flexes as the gear spins, is tricky to mass produce and ubiquitous in expensive robots. Not only can BMGs allow these gears to perform at low temperatures, but they can also be manufactured at a fraction of the cost of their steel versions without sacrificing performance. This is potentially game changing for reducing the cost of robots that use strain wave gears, since they are often their most expensive part. "Mass producing strain wave gears using BMGs may have a major impact on the consumer robotics market," Hofmann said. "This is especially true for humanoid robots, where gears in the joints can be very expensive but are required to prevent shaking arms. The performance at low temperatures for JPL spacecraft and rovers seems to be a happy added benefit." The paper published by Advanced Engineering Materials looked at designing and testing BMG gears for planetary gearboxes. It included collaborators at Caltech and UC San Diego. The paper published in Scientific Reports examines how BMGs can be used to reduce the cost of strainwave gears. It also included Caltech collaborators. The Bulk Metallic Glass Gears project is funded by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate's Game Changing Development Program, which investigates ideas and approaches that could solve significant technological problems and revo¬lutionize future space endeavors.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A major new £100 million investment by the government into the development of an innovative multi-disciplinary science and technology research centre was announced today (Thursday 23rd February) by Business Secretary Greg Clark. The new Rosalind Franklin Institute (RFI) - named in honour of the pioneering British scientist whose use of X-rays to study biological structures played a crucial role in the discovery of DNA's 'double helix' structure by Francis Crick and James Watson - will bring together UK strengths in the physical sciences, engineering and life sciences to create a national centre of excellence in technology development and innovation. Business Secretary Greg Clark said: "The UK has always been a pioneer in the world of science, technology and medical research. It's this excellence we want to continue to build on and why we made science and research a central part of our Industrial Strategy - strengthening links between research and industry, ensuring more home-grown innovation continues to benefit millions around the world. "Named after one of the UK's leading chemists, the new Rosalind Franklin Institute will inspire and house scientists who could be responsible for the next great discovery that will maintain the UK's position at the forefront of global science for years to come." Delivered and managed by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the RFI will bring together academic and industry researchers from across the UK to develop disruptive new technologies designed to tackle major challenges in health and life sciences, accelerate the discovery of new treatments for chronic diseases affecting millions of people around the world (such as dementia), and deliver new jobs and long-term growth to the local and UK economies. Chair of the Research Councils and EPSRC Chief Executive, Professor Philip Nelson said: "The UK is currently in a world leading position when it comes to developing new medical treatments and technologies in the life sciences. However, other countries are alive to the potential and are already investing heavily. The Rosalind Franklin Institute will help secure the country as one of the best places in the world to research, discover, and innovate." The central hub at Harwell will link to partner sites at the universities of Cambridge, Edinburgh, Manchester and Oxford, Imperial College, King's College London, and University College London. Industry partners will be on board from the outset, and the Institute will grow over time, as more universities and researchers participate. The work at new Institute will contribute directly to the delivery of EPSRC's 'Healthy Nation' prosperity outcome, its Healthcare Technologies programme, and to the Technology Touching Life initiative that spans three research councils (the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), the Medical Research Council (MRC) and EPSRC) and seeks to foster interdisciplinary technology development research across the engineering, physical and life sciences. The development of the RFI has been led by Professor Ian Walmsley, FRS, from the University of Oxford, who said: "This is a new joint venture between some of the UK's leading universities and key partners in industry and research councils. The aim is to speed the application of cutting-edge physical science insights, methods and techniques to health and life sciences by providing an interface between research programmes at the forefront of these areas, co-located at Harwell and connected, dynamically, to the wider UK research base. "We anticipate innovative new businesses will grow from this effort over time, as the Institute will engage with a range of key industries from inception. A collaborative joint venture model allows the RFI to make the most of interactions and draw on a wide range of existing research excellence from across the UK." Patrick Vallance President of R&D at GSK said: "We welcome the creation of the RFI which will bring world-leading, multi-disciplinary teams from industry and academia closer together, and will further strengthen the UK as a place to translate excellent science into patient benefit. Through collaboration we will be able to make advances in life science technologies much quicker than we could manage alone." Research at the RFI will initially be centred on five selected technology themes, focusing on next-generation imaging technologies - X-ray science, correlated imaging (combining X-ray, electron and light microscopy), imaging by sound and light, and biological mass spectrometry - and on new chemical methods and strategies for drug discovery. Dame Carol Robinson, FRS, who is leading the RFI's biological mass spectrometry theme, and received the 2004 Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award that recognises outstanding scientific contributions and supports the promotion of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, said: "It is fitting that this new Institute bears Rosalind Franklin's name. She achieved so much in a relatively short life and without her work many of the advances that have taken place since would not have come about. Work in the Institute will include development of the next-generation of physical tools including mass spectrometry, instruments for X-ray science and for advanced microscopy - fields directly descended from her research interests." For further information please contact the EPSRC Press Office on 01793 444 404 or email pressoffice@epsrc.ac.uk As the main funding agency for engineering and physical sciences research, our vision is for the UK to be the best place in the world to Research, Discover and Innovate. By investing £800 million a year in research and postgraduate training, we are building the knowledge and skills base needed to address the scientific and technological challenges facing the nation. Our portfolio covers a vast range of fields from healthcare technologies to structural engineering, manufacturing to mathematics, advanced materials to chemistry. The research we fund has impact across all sectors. It provides a platform for future economic development in the UK and improvements for everyone's health, lifestyle and culture. We work collectively with our partners and other Research Councils on issues of common concern via Research Councils UK. http://www. The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) is keeping the UK at the forefront of international science and tackling some of the most significant challenges facing society such as meeting our future energy needs, monitoring and understanding climate change, and global security. The Council has a broad science portfolio and works with the academic and industrial communities to share its expertise in materials science, space and ground-based astronomy technologies, laser science, microelectronics, wafer scale manufacturing, particle and nuclear physics, alternative energy production, radio communications and radar. STFC operates or hosts world class experimental facilities including in the UK the ISIS pulsed neutron source, the Central Laser Facility, and LOFAR, and is also the majority shareholder in Diamond Light Source Ltd. It enables UK researchers to access leading international science facilities by funding membership of international bodies including European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL), European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO). STFC is one of seven publicly-funded research councils. It is an independent, non-departmental public body of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS). Follow us on Twitter at @STFC_Matters. http://www. BBSRC invests in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public. Our aim is to further scientific knowledge, to promote economic growth, wealth and job creation and to improve quality of life in the UK and beyond. Funded by Government, BBSRC invested £473M in world-class bioscience, people and research infrastructure in 2015-16. We support research and training in universities and strategically funded institutes. BBSRC research and the people we fund are helping society to meet major challenges, including food security, green energy and healthier, longer lives. Our investments underpin important UK economic sectors, such as farming, food, industrial biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. More information about BBSRC, our science and our impact. The Medical Research Council is at the forefront of scientific discovery to improve human health. Founded in 1913 to tackle tuberculosis, the MRC now invests taxpayers' money in some of the best medical research in the world across every area of health. Thirty-one MRC-funded researchers have won Nobel prizes in a wide range of disciplines, and MRC scientists have been behind such diverse discoveries as vitamins, the structure of DNA and the link between smoking and cancer, as well as achievements such as pioneering the use of randomised controlled trials, the invention of MRI scanning, and the development of a group of antibodies used in the making of some of the most successful drugs ever developed. Today, MRC-funded scientists tackle some of the greatest health problems facing humanity in the 21st century, from the rising tide of chronic diseases associated with ageing to the threats posed by rapidly mutating micro-organisms. http://www. Diamond Light Source is the UK's synchrotron science facility, and is approximately the size of Wembley Stadium. It works like a giant microscope, harnessing the power of electrons to produce bright light that scientists can use to study anything from fossils to jet engines to viruses and vaccines. Diamond is used by thousands of academic and industrial researchers across a wide range of disciplines, including structural biology, health and medicine, solid-state physics, materials & magnetism, nanoscience, electronics, earth & environmental sciences, chemistry, cultural heritage, energy and engineering. Many everyday commodities that we take for granted, from food manufacturing to consumer products, from revolutionary drugs to surgical tools, from computers to mobile phones, have all been developed or improved using synchrotron light. Diamond generates extremely intense pin-point beams of synchrotron light. These are of exceptional quality, and range from X-rays to ultraviolet to infrared. Diamond's X-rays are around 10 billion times brighter than the sun. Diamond is one of the most advanced scientific facilities in the world, and its pioneering capabilities are helping to keep the UK at the forefront of scientific research. 2017 marks a double celebration for Diamond - 15 years since the company was formed, and 10 years of research and innovation. In this time, researchers who have obtained their data at Diamond have authored over 5,000 papers. The institute is funded by the UK Government through the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), and by the Wellcome Trust For more information about Diamond visit http://www. Harwell Campus is a public private partnership between Harwell Oxford Partners, U+I Group PLC and two Government backed agencies, the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) and the UK Atomic Energy Agency (UKAEA). Harwell is one of the world's most important science and innovation locations. It has a growing reputation as the UK's gateway to space with over 65 space and satellite applications related organisations located on campus and is now seeing rapid growth in the Life Sciences and HealthTec sector with over 1,000 people working in this field alone at Harwell. In addition to space and life sciences, the campus hosts an array of other key sectors including, Big Data and Supercomputing, Energy and Environment and Advanced Engineering and Materials. With a legacy of many world firsts, the campus comprises 710 acres, over 200 organisations and 5,500 people. Harwell Campus is the UK's National Science Facility and is among Europe and the world's leading sites dedicated to the advancement of science, technology and innovation. Having spent 75 years at the forefront of British innovation and discovery, Harwell Campus continues to drive scientific advancements to the benefit of the UK economy and centred around a community hub. Science experts, academics, government organisations, private sector R&D departments and investors create an environment where innovation, collaboration and discovery thrive. To find out more about events, open days or the new developments, visit http://www. or call 01235 250091


Harwell Campus SWINDON, 27-Feb-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — A major new £100 million investment by the government into the development of an innovative multi-disciplinary science and technology research centre was announced today (Thursday 23 February 2017) by Business Secretary Greg Clark. The new Rosalind Franklin Institute (RFI) – named in honour of the pioneering British scientist whose use of X-rays to study biological structures played a crucial role in the discovery of DNA‘s ‘double helix’ structure by Francis Crick and James Watson – will bring together UK strengths in the physical sciences, engineering and life sciences to create a national centre of excellence in technology development and innovation. The new Rosalind Franklin Institute will have a hub based at the Harwell campus It will bring together UK expertise to develop new technologies that will transform our understanding of disease and speed up the development of new treatments Part of the government’s Industrial Strategy to maintain the UK’s global leadership in science, innovation and research Business Secretary Greg Clark said: The UK has always been a pioneer in the world of science, technology and medical research. It’s this excellence we want to continue to build on and why we made science and research a central part of our Industrial Strategy – strengthening links between research and industry, ensuring more home-grown innovation continues to benefit millions around the world. Named after one of the UK’s leading chemists, the new Rosalind Franklin Institute will inspire and house scientists who could be responsible for the next great discovery that will maintain the UK’s position at the forefront of global science for years to come. Delivered and managed by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the RFI will bring together academic and industry researchers from across the UK to develop disruptive new technologies designed to tackle major challenges in health and life sciences, accelerate the discovery of new treatments for chronic diseases affecting millions of people around the world (such as dementia), and deliver new jobs and long-term growth to the local and UK economies. Chair of the Research Councils and EPSRC Chief Executive, Professor Philip Nelson said: The UK is currently in a world leading position when it comes to developing new medical treatments and technologies in the life sciences. However, other countries are alive to the potential and are already investing heavily. The Rosalind Franklin Institute will help secure the country as one of the best places in the world to research, discover, and innovate. The central hub at Harwell will link to partner sites at the universities of Cambridge, Edinburgh, Manchester and Oxford, Imperial College, King’s College London, and University College London. Industry partners will be on board from the outset, and the Institute will grow over time, as more universities and researchers participate. The work at new Institute will contribute directly to the delivery of EPSRC‘s ‘Healthy Nation’ prosperity outcome, its Healthcare Technologies programme, and to the Technology Touching Life initiative that spans three research councils (the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), the Medical Research Council (MRC) and EPSRC) and seeks to foster interdisciplinary technology development research across the engineering, physical and life sciences. The development of the RFI has been led by Professor Ian Walmsley, FRS, from the University of Oxford, who said: This is a new joint venture between some of the UK’s leading universities and key partners in industry and research councils. The aim is to speed the application of cutting-edge physical science insights, methods and techniques to health and life sciences by providing an interface between research programmes at the forefront of these areas, co-located at Harwell and connected, dynamically, to the wider UK research base. We anticipate innovative new businesses will grow from this effort over time, as the Institute will engage with a range of key industries from inception. A collaborative joint venture model allows the RFI to make the most of interactions and draw on a wide range of existing research excellence from across the UK. Patrick Vallance, President of R&D at GSK said: We welcome the creation of the RFI which will bring world-leading, multi-disciplinary teams from industry and academia closer together, and will further strengthen the UK as a place to translate excellent science into patient benefit. Through collaboration we will be able to make advances in life science technologies much quicker than we could manage alone. Research at the RFI will initially be centred on five selected technology themes, focusing on next-generation imaging technologies – X-ray science, correlated imaging (combining X-ray, electron and light microscopy), imaging by sound and light, and biological mass spectrometry – and on new chemical methods and strategies for drug discovery. Dame Carol Robinson, FRS, who is leading the RFI‘s biological mass spectrometry theme, and received the 2004 Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award that recognises outstanding scientific contributions and supports the promotion of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, said: It is fitting that this new Institute bears Rosalind Franklin’s name. She achieved so much in a relatively short life and without her work many of the advances that have taken place since would not have come about. Work in the Institute will include development of the next-generation of physical tools including mass spectrometry, instruments for X-ray science and for advanced microscopy – fields directly descended from her research interests. Notes for Editors: The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) As the main funding agency for engineering and physical sciences research, our vision is for the UK to be the best place in the world to Research, Discover and Innovate. By investing £800 million a year in research and postgraduate training, we are building the knowledge and skills base needed to address the scientific and technological challenges facing the nation. Our portfolio covers a vast range of fields from healthcare technologies to structural engineering, manufacturing to mathematics, advanced materials to chemistry. The research we fund has impact across all sectors. It provides a platform for future economic development in the UK and improvements for everyone’s health, lifestyle and culture. We work collectively with our partners and other Research Councils on issues of common concern via Research Councils UK. The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) STFC is keeping the UK at the forefront of international science and tackling some of the most significant challenges facing society such as meeting our future energy needs, monitoring and understanding climate change, and global security. The Council has a broad science portfolio and works with the academic and industrial communities to share its expertise in materials science, space and ground-based astronomy technologies, laser science, microelectronics, wafer scale manufacturing, particle and nuclear physics, alternative energy production, radio communications and radar. STFC operates or hosts world class experimental facilities including in the UK the ISIS pulsed neutron source, the Central Laser Facility, and LOFAR, and is also the majority shareholder in Diamond Light Source Ltd. It enables UK researchers to access leading international science facilities by funding membership of international bodies including European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL), European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO). STFC is one of seven publicly-funded research councils. It is an independent, non-departmental public body of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) BBSRC invests in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public. Our aim is to further scientific knowledge, to promote economic growth, wealth and job creation and to improve quality of life in the UK and beyond. Funded by Government, BBSRC invested £473M in world-class bioscience, people and research infrastructure in 2015-16. We support research and training in universities and strategically funded institutes. BBSRC research and the people we fund are helping society to meet major challenges, including food security, green energy and healthier, longer lives. Our investments underpin important UK economic sectors, such as farming, food, industrial biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. More information about BBSRC strategically funded institutes. The Medical Research Council (MRC) The Medical Research Council is at the forefront of scientific discovery to improve human health. Founded in 1913 to tackle tuberculosis, the MRC now invests taxpayers’ money in some of the best medical research in the world across every area of health. Thirty-one MRC-funded researchers have won Nobel prizes in a wide range of disciplines, and MRC scientists have been behind such diverse discoveries as vitamins, the structure of DNA and the link between smoking and cancer, as well as achievements such as pioneering the use of randomised controlled trials, the invention of MRI scanning, and the development of a group of antibodies used in the making of some of the most successful drugs ever developed. Today, MRC-funded scientists tackle some of the greatest health problems facing humanity in the 21st century, from the rising tide of chronic diseases associated with ageing to the threats posed by rapidly mutating micro-organisms. www.mrc.ac.uk Diamond Light Source Diamond Light Source is the UK’s synchrotron science facility, and is approximately the size of Wembley Stadium. It works like a giant microscope, harnessing the power of electrons to produce bright light that scientists can use to study anything from fossils to jet engines to viruses and vaccines. Diamond is used by thousands of academic and industrial researchers across a wide range of disciplines, including structural biology, health and medicine, solid-state physics, materials & magnetism, nanoscience, electronics, earth & environmental sciences, chemistry, cultural heritage, energy and engineering. Many everyday commodities that we take for granted, from food manufacturing to consumer products, from revolutionary drugs to surgical tools, from computers to mobile phones, have all been developed or improved using synchrotron light. Diamond generates extremely intense pin-point beams of synchrotron light. These are of exceptional quality, and range from X-rays to ultraviolet to infrared. Diamond’s X-rays are around 10 billion times brighter than the sun. Diamond is one of the most advanced scientific facilities in the world, and its pioneering capabilities are helping to keep the UK at the forefront of scientific research. 2017 marks a double celebration for Diamond – 15 years since the company was formed, and 10 years of research and innovation. In this time, researchers who have obtained their data at Diamond have authored over 5,000 papers. The institute is funded by the UK Government through the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), and by the Wellcome Trust The Harwell Campus Harwell Campus is a public private partnership between Harwell Oxford Partners, U+I Group PLC and two Government backed agencies, the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) and the UK Atomic Energy Agency (UKAEA). Harwell is one of the world’s most important science and innovation locations. It has a growing reputation as the UK’s gateway to space with over 65 space and satellite applications related organisations located on campus and is now seeing rapid growth in the Life Sciences and HealthTec sector with over 1,000 people working in this field alone at Harwell. In addition to space and life sciences, the campus hosts an array of other key sectors including, Big Data and Supercomputing, Energy and Environment and Advanced Engineering and Materials. With a legacy of many world firsts, the campus comprises 710 acres, over 200 organisations and 5,500 people. Harwell Campus is the UK’s National Science Facility and is among Europe and the world’s leading sites dedicated to the advancement of science, technology and innovation. Having spent 75 years at the forefront of British innovation and discovery, Harwell Campus continues to drive scientific advancements to the benefit of the UK economy and centred around a community hub. Science experts, academics, government organisations, private sector R&D departments and investors create an environment where innovation, collaboration and discovery thrive. Harwell’s Cluster Strategy The Cluster of about 70 Space organisations at Harwell is testament to the power of co-locating industry, academia and the public sector alongside investors and entrepreneurs. The European Space Agency, RAL Space, The UK Space Agency, Airbus, Thales Alenia Space, Lockheed Martin, and Deimos Space UK can all be found on the Campus. This creates many opportunities for collaboration, increasing capability and sharing risk. Being within a Cluster brings access to high-quality common infrastructure, facilities and expertise, alongside exposure to new markets The Harwell vision is to be home to a number of Clusters that exploit the existing strengths of the Campus. The next step is a new HealthTec Cluster that will benefit from the considerable synergies across the life and physical sciences capabilities of the Campus and the Space cluster. These clusters will enrich each other, creating a powerful multidisciplinary environment tailored to problem solving that will allow the UK to compete with the best in the world. The clustering of industries, facilities and science experts has given rise to the term Harwell Effect – and is an ideal model for future science and business innovation programmes. Science clusters drive economic growth. MIT has created businesses with a combined value of $3tn, the equivalent of California’s GDP. Harwell Campus is the only location in the UK with the potential to emulate this success. To find out more about events, open days or the new developments, visit the Harwell Campus website. SOURCE: EPSRC Contact Details In the following table, contact information relevant to the page. The first column is for visual reference only. Data is in the right column. Name: EPSRC Press Office Telephone: 01793 444404


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Branchenweit anerkannter Technologiespezialist wird bei Visteon die Weiterentwicklung von ADAS-Controllern und -Plattformen leiten. VAN BUREN TOWNSHIP, Michigan, 6. Dezember 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Die Visteon Corporation (NYSE: VC), der führende Automobilhersteller von Cockpitelektronik, hat Matthias Schulze die Entwicklungsleitung für Fahrerassistenzsysteme (ADAS, Advanced Driver Assistance System) der nächsten Generation einschließlich eines neuen zentralisierten Ansatzes für Domain-Controller- und Plattformentwicklung übertragen. Matthias Schulze wird im Visteon Technologiezentrum in Karlsruhe, Deutschland, tätig sein und an Chief Technology Officer Markus Schupfner berichten. Seine neue Position bei Visteon wird Schulze im Januar 2017 antreten. Zurzeit ist Matthias Schulze bei der Daimler AG beschäftigt, wo er die Aktivitäten des Automobilherstellers in den Bereichen Group Research und Advanced Engineering in der Umgebungswahrnehmung leitet und für die Entwicklung von ADAS-Systemen sowie für die Bereiche autonomes Fahren und Fahrzeugkommunikation verantwortlich ist. Mit über 20 Jahren Erfahrung in der Entwicklung fortschrittlicher Technologien ist Schulze ein anerkannter Technologie-Experte mit hervorragenden Verbindungen zu globalen ADAS und ITS (Intelligent Transport) Gemeinschaften, internationalen Konsortien und akademischen Institutionen sowie Forschungs- und Entwicklungszentren führender Automobilhersteller und Zulieferer. „Visteon hat sich die Entwicklung von branchenführenden Lösungen für autonomes Fahren und ADAS zum Ziel gesetzt. Wir freuen uns, dass Matthias Schulze mit seinen Qualifikationen diese Initiative leitet", so Sachin Lawande, President und CEO bei Visteon. „Matthias besitzt herausragende Kenntnisse und Fähigkeiten zur Entwicklung von ADAS-Technologien. Mit seiner einzigartigen Reputation als anerkannter Experte auf diesem Gebiet wird er dazu beitragen, Visteon als führenden Anbieter von Lösungen für das autonome Fahren zu etablieren." Schulze ist der jüngste Neuzugang im Team führender Technologie-Experten des von Visteon neu gegründeten Chief Technology Office (CTO), das von Markus Schupfner geleitet wird. Das CTO ist für die Entwicklung branchenführender ADAS-Systeme und Lösungen für autonomes Fahren verantwortlich, die auf dem Ansatz eines einzigartigen zentralen Domain-Controllers basieren und sich auf künstliche Intelligenz sowie Objekterkennung und -klassifizierung durch Maschinen stützen. „Ich freue mich sehr, Matthias bei Visteon begrüßen zu dürfen", sagte Schupfner. „Mit seinen Erfolgen bei der Markteinführung neuer Technologien ist er eine hervorragende Ergänzung unseres Teams, das an der Umsetzung unseres Technologie-Fahrplans arbeitet, um durch ADAS-Anwendungen autonomes Fahren Realität werden zu lassen." Schulze besitzt einen Universitätsabschluss in Maschinenbau, erworben an der Universität Karlsruhe, Deutschland, und einen Abschluss für Betriebswirtschaft, den er am Institut für betriebswirtschaftliche Weiterbildung in Würzburg, Deutschland, erlangt hat. Visteon ist ein globales Unternehmen, das für die meisten der weltweit führenden Automobilhersteller innovative Cockpit-Elektronikprodukte und Lösungen für vernetzte Autos entwickelt und produziert. Visteon ist ein führender Anbieter von Kombi-Instrumenten, Head-Up-Displays, Informationsanzeigen, Infotainment- und Audio-Systemen sowie Telematiklösungen und SmartCore™ Cockpit-Domänencontrollern. Darüber hinaus liefert Visteon eingebettete Softwarelösungen für die Konnektivität von Multimedia-Geräten und Smartphones für die globale Automobilindustrie. Der Hauptsitz des Unternehmens, das an über 40 Standorten in 18 Ländern zirka 10.000 Mitarbeiter beschäftigt, befindet sich in Van Buren Township im US-Bundesstaat Michigan. Visteon erzielte 2015 einen Umsatz von 3,25 Milliarden USD. Weitere Informationen erhalten Sie auf unserer Website www.visteon.com.


Wiseguyreports.Com Adds “Advanced Packaging -Market Demand, Growth, Opportunities and analysis of Top Key Player Forecast to 2021” To Its Research Database This report studies sales (consumption) of Advanced Packaging in Global market, especially in United States, China, Europe, Japan, focuses on top players in these regions/countries, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each player in these regions, covering Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with sales (consumption), revenue, market share and growth rate of Advanced Packaging in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like United States China Europe Japan Split by product Types, with sales, revenue, price and gross margin, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Type I Type II Type III Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of Advanced Packaging in each application, can be divided into Application 1 Application 2 Application 3 Global Advanced Packaging Sales Market Report 2016 1 Advanced Packaging Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Advanced Packaging 1.2 Classification of Advanced Packaging 1.2.1 Type I 1.2.2 Type II 1.2.3 Type III 1.3 Application of Advanced Packaging 1.3.1 Application 1 1.3.2 Application 2 1.3.3 Application 3 1.4 Advanced Packaging Market by Regions 1.4.1 United States Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.2 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.3 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value and Volume) of Advanced Packaging (2011-2021) 1.5.1 Global Advanced Packaging Sales and Growth Rate (2011-2021) 1.5.2 Global Advanced Packaging Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021) 7 Global Advanced Packaging Manufacturers Analysis 7.1 ASE 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.1.2 Advanced Packaging Product Type, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Type I 7.1.2.2 Type II 7.1.3 ASE Advanced Packaging Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 Amkor Technology 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.2.2 117 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Type I 7.2.2.2 Type II 7.2.3 Amkor Technology Advanced Packaging Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 SPIL 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.3.2 136 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Type I 7.3.2.2 Type II 7.3.3 SPIL Advanced Packaging Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 Stats Chippac 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.4.2 Nov Product Type, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Type I 7.4.2.2 Type II 7.4.3 Stats Chippac Advanced Packaging Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 Powertech Technology 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.5.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Type I 7.5.2.2 Type II 7.5.3 Powertech Technology Advanced Packaging Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 Jiangsu Changjiang Electronics Technology 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.6.2 Million USD Product Type, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Type I 7.6.2.2 Type II 7.6.3 Jiangsu Changjiang Electronics Technology Advanced Packaging Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.7 J-Devices 7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.7.2 Chemical & Material Product Type, Application and Specification 7.7.2.1 Type I 7.7.2.2 Type II 7.7.3 J-Devices Advanced Packaging Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.8 UTAC 7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.8.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.8.2.1 Type I 7.8.2.2 Type II 7.8.3 UTAC Advanced Packaging Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.9 Chipmos Technologies 7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.9.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.9.2.1 Type I 7.9.2.2 Type II 7.9.3 Chipmos Technologies Advanced Packaging Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.10 Chipbond Technology 7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.10.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.10.2.1 Type I 7.10.2.2 Type II 7.10.3 Chipbond Technology Advanced Packaging Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.11 STS Semiconductor 7.12 Tianshui Huatian Technology 7.13 Nantong Fujitsu Microelectronics 7.14 Carsem Semiconductor 7.15 Walton Advanced Engineering 7.16 Unisem 7.17 Orient Semiconductor Electronics 7.18 AOI Electronics 7.19 Formosa Advanced Technologies 7.20 NEPES


News Article | November 11, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

Notes:  Sales, means the sales volume of Advanced Packaging  Revenue, means the sales value of Advanced Packaging This report studies sales (consumption) of Advanced Packaging in Global market, especially in United States, China, Europe, Japan, focuses on top players in these regions/countries, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each player in these regions, covering  ASE  Amkor Technology  SPIL  Stats Chippac  Powertech Technology  Jiangsu Changjiang Electronics Technology  J-Devices  UTAC  Chipmos Technologies  Chipbond Technology  STS Semiconductor  Tianshui Huatian Technology  Nantong Fujitsu Microelectronics  Carsem Semiconductor  Walton Advanced Engineering  Unisem  Orient Semiconductor Electronics  AOI Electronics  Formosa Advanced Technologies  NEPES  Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with sales (consumption), revenue, market share and growth rate of Advanced Packaging in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like  United States  China  Europe  Japan  Split by product Types, with sales, revenue, price and gross margin, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into  Type I  Type II  Type III  Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of Advanced Packaging in each application, can be divided into  Application 1  Application 2  Application 3 Global Advanced Packaging Sales Market Report 2016  1 Advanced Packaging Overview  1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Advanced Packaging  1.2 Classification of Advanced Packaging  1.2.1 Type I  1.2.2 Type II  1.2.3 Type III  1.3 Application of Advanced Packaging  1.3.1 Application 1  1.3.2 Application 2  1.3.3 Application 3  1.4 Advanced Packaging Market by Regions  1.4.1 United States Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.2 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.3 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.5 Global Market Size (Value and Volume) of Advanced Packaging (2011-2021)  1.5.1 Global Advanced Packaging Sales and Growth Rate (2011-2021)  1.5.2 Global Advanced Packaging Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021) 2 Global Advanced Packaging Competition by Manufacturers, Type and Application  2.1 Global Advanced Packaging Market Competition by Manufacturers  2.1.1 Global Advanced Packaging Sales and Market Share of Key Manufacturers (2011-2016)  2.1.2 Global Advanced Packaging Revenue and Share by Manufacturers (2011-2016)  2.2 Global Advanced Packaging (Volume and Value) by Type  2.2.1 Global Advanced Packaging Sales and Market Share by Type (2011-2016)  2.2.2 Global Advanced Packaging Revenue and Market Share by Type (2011-2016) Figure Picture of Advanced Packaging  Table Classification of Advanced Packaging  Figure Global Sales Market Share of Advanced Packaging by Type in 2015  Figure Type I Picture  Figure Type II Picture  Table Applications of Advanced Packaging  Figure Global Sales Market Share of Advanced Packaging by Application in 2015  Figure Application 1 Examples  Figure Application 2 Examples  Figure United States Advanced Packaging Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021)  Figure China Advanced Packaging Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021)  Figure Europe Advanced Packaging Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021)  Figure Japan Advanced Packaging Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021)  Figure Global Advanced Packaging Sales and Growth Rate (2011-2021)  Figure Global Advanced Packaging Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021)  Table Global Advanced Packaging Sales of Key Manufacturers (2011-2016)  Table Global Advanced Packaging Sales Share by Manufacturers (2011-2016)  Figure 2015 Advanced Packaging Sales Share by Manufacturers  Figure 2016 Advanced Packaging Sales Share by Manufacturers  Table Global Advanced Packaging Revenue by Manufacturers (2011-2016)  Table Global Advanced Packaging Revenue Share by Manufacturers (2011-2016)  Table 2015 Global Advanced Packaging Revenue Share by Manufacturers  Table 2016 Global Advanced Packaging Revenue Share by Manufacturers  Table Global Advanced Packaging Sales and Market Share by Type (2011-2016)  Table Global Advanced Packaging Sales Share by Type (2011-2016)  Figure Sales Market Share of Advanced Packaging by Type (2011-2016)  Figure Global Advanced Packaging Sales Growth Rate by Type (2011-2016)  Table Global Advanced Packaging Revenue and Market Share by Type (2011-2016) FOR ANY QUERY, REACH US @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/enquiry/736131-global-advanced-packaging-sales-market-report-2016


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

The autonomic cloud platform enables self-managing EC2 instances and Kubernetes clusters, partnering with RiverMeadow to enable customers to safely accelerate cloud migration initiatives BOSTON, MA--(Marketwired - December 01, 2016) - Turbonomic, the autonomic cloud platform, will be demonstrating new cloud native capabilities at AWS re:Invent 2016, booth 1944. With most of Turbonomic's over 1600 customers adopting or preparing to adopt the cloud, Turbonomic aims to ensure their success as they do so. These extensions to the platform, as well as the recent partnership with RiverMeadow Software, are only the latest examples of Turbonomic's commitment to enabling customers to confidently accelerate their cloud strategies. Turbonomic provides organizations leveraging elastic compute in the cloud the ability to scale while assuring app performance and minimizing cloud costs. Traditionally, AWS users must determine EC2 placement, sizing, and autoscaling manually, often relying on 3rd-party or homegrown automation scripts to scale. An autonomic cloud platform elevates humans from this cumbersome process by enabling EC2 instances to self-manage. Turbonomic also enables more organizations to reap the benefits of Kubernetes at scale. The autonomic platform enables Pods and EC2 instances to self-manage, significantly minimizing the operational lift and expertise typically required to run Kubernetes. With Turbonomic, users can fully leverage this powerful open source container-cluster manager, controlling heterogeneous, highly-dynamic environments at scale. Further, Turbonomic is announcing a partnership with RiverMeadow Software, a leading provider of cross-hypervisor, Lift & Shift server migration. RiverMeadow's SaaS offering automates the migration of physical, virtual and cloud-based servers into and between public, private and hybrid clouds. "Performance fine-tuning and cloud migration are two significant friction points that enterprises are faced with when migrating servers to Cloud," says Richard Scannell, President & CEO of RiverMeadow Software. "The RiverMeadow-Turbonomic partnership removes this friction. It arms customers with the analytics necessary to make smart business decisions on where to house their servers and applications while providing them with automated migration at scale and real-time self-management." Together, Turbonomic and RiverMeadow Software enable customers to accelerate cloud migrations by assuring application performance across hybrid- and multi-cloud environments. The RiverMeadow partnership and Turbonomic's cloud native capabilities are only the most recent examples of the promise of autonomic intelligence. In November 2015, Verizon and Turbonomic jointly announced Intelligent Cloud Control. Powered by Turbonomic, ICC drives real-time, automatable, price-, performance- and compliance-based placement decisions, as well as sizing and configuration decisions to deploy and migrate workloads to and across CSPs. In October 2016, Turbonomic announced Cloud Cost Compare, a free service which, after input of the details of your application, tells you where your application should run based on performance and cost. "Customers are eager to leverage public clouds for the agility and go-to-market benefits the cloud enables. Whether IT decision-makers take a hybrid- or multi-cloud approach, Turbonomic is committed to providing the autonomic platform that enables the production-grade delivery of their vision," said Turbonomic VP of Advanced Engineering, Endre Sara. "Our efforts over the last year are just the beginning." In 2009 Turbonomic's founders set out to create a platform that controls any workload on any infrastructure. That mission to transform the industry with autonomic intelligence has even greater relevance as organizations leverage multiple clouds-each with their own ecosystem of tools and services-to deliver IT services. Turbonomic delivers an autonomic platform where virtual and cloud environments self-manage in real-time to assure application performance. Turbonomic's patented decision engine dynamically analyzes application demand and allocates shared resources to maintain a continuous state of application health. Launched in 2010, Turbonomic is one of the fastest growing technology companies in the virtualization and cloud space. Turbonomic's autonomic platform is trusted by thousands of enterprises to accelerate their adoption of virtual, cloud, and container deployments for all mission critical applications. RiverMeadow Software Inc. sets the standard for cloud migration with its industry-leading RiverMeadow SaaS that automates the Lift & Shift migration of physical, virtual and cloud-based servers into and between public, private and hybrid clouds. For more information, visit www.rivermeadow.com or follow the company on Twitter at @RiverMeadow1 and LinkedIn.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: phys.org

The finding might overcome a basic issue confronting medical engineers: How to create electronics that are flexible enough to be worn comfortably on or even inside the human body—without exposing a person to harmful chemicals in the process—and will last long enough to be useful and convenient. "Overall this could be a major step in wearable sensor research," said NIST biomedical engineer Darwin Reyes-Hernandez. Wearable health monitors are already commonplace; bracelet-style fitness trackers have escaped mere utility to become a full-on fashion trend. But the medical field has its eye on something more profound, known as personalized medicine. The long-term goal is to keep track of hundreds of real-time changes in our bodies—from fluctuations in the amount of potassium in sweat to the level of particular sugars or proteins in the bloodstream. These changes manifest themselves a bit differently in each person, and some of them could mark the onset of disease in ways not yet apparent to a doctor's eye. Wearable electronics might help spot those problems early. First, though, engineers need a way to build them so that they work dependably and safely—a tall order for the metals that make up their circuits and the flexible surfaces or "substrates" on which they are built. Gold is a good option because it does not corrode, unlike most metals, and it has the added value of being nontoxic. But it's also brittle. If you bend it, it tends to crack, potentially breaking completely— meaning thin gold wires might stop conducting electricity after a few twists of the body. "Gold has been used to make wires that run across plastic surfaces, but until now the plastic has needed to be fairly rigid," said Reyes-Hernandez. "You wouldn't want it attached to you; it would be uncomfortable." Reyes-Hernandez doesn't work on wearable electronics. His field is microfluidics, the study of tiny quantities of liquid and their flow, typically through narrow, thin channels. One day he was exploring a commercially available porous polyester membrane—it feels like ordinary plastic wrap, only a lot lighter and thinner—to see if its tiny holes could make it useful for separating different fluid components. He patterned some gold electrodes onto the membrane to create a simple device that would help with separations. While sitting at his desk, he twisted the plastic a few times and noticed the electrodes, which covered numerous pores as they crisscrossed the surface, still conducted electricity. This wasn't the case with nonporous membranes. "Apparently the pores keep the gold from cracking as dramatically as usual," he said. "The cracks are so tiny that the gold still conducts well after bending." Reyes-Hernandez said the porous membrane's electrodes show even higher conductivity than their counterparts on rigid surfaces, an unexpected benefit that he cannot explain as yet. The next steps, he said, will be to test changes in conductivity over the long term after many bends and twists, and also to build some sort of sensor out of the electrode-coated membrane to explore its real-world usability. "This thin membrane could fit into very small places," he said, "and its flexibility and high conductivity make it a very special material, almost one of a kind." Explore further: Supersonic spray yields new nanomaterial for bendable, wearable electronics More information: Aveek Gangopadhyay et al, Flexible Thin-Film Electrodes on Porous Polyester Membranes for Wearable Sensors , Advanced Engineering Materials (2016). DOI: 10.1002/adem.201600592


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.techradar.com

To a robot, gears are everything. High-quality gears mean that robotic limbs start and stop smoothly, and operate without jerking or shaking. Low-quality gears are usually a recipe for disaster. That's why Nasa is pursuing an exotic material to make the gears that'll drive the next generation of robotic astronauts. Metallic glass is a specially-crafted alloy that's made by heating up a metal until it melts and then cooling it extremely rapidly to trap its "liquid" structure in place. The result is a material that's extremely easy to shape into whatever parts you need, but has a much higher strength and wear-resistance than alternatives like plastic. Most importantly for Nasa, metallic glasses don't get brittle when exposed to low temperatures. For robots sent to frozen planets in our outer solar-system, that's extremely useful. Past generations of robotic explorers, like Curiosity, use lubricant in their gearboxes that must be heated before use - a process that requires precious power. In testing of metallic glass gears however, Nasa engineers showed that they demonstrate strong torque and smooth turning with no lubricant at all, even at temperatures as low as -200C. "Being able to operate gears at the low temperature of icy moons, like Europa, is a potential game changer for scientists," R Peter Dillon, a Nasa technologist. "Power no longer needs to be siphoned away from the science instruments for heating gearbox lubricant, which preserves precious battery power." What's more, it could have advantages on Earth too. It turns out that a complex, expensive robotics component called a "strain wave gear" can be made far more simply and cheaply, without sacrificing performance, by using metallic glass. "Mass producing strain wave gears using metallic glass may have a major impact on the consumer robotics market," said Douglas Hofmann, who led the research. "This is especially true for humanoid robots, where gears in the joints can be very expensive but are required to prevent shaking arms." "The performance at low temperatures for JPL spacecraft and rovers seems to be a happy added benefit." Details of the gears produced by JPL can be found in published in Advanced Engineering Materials and Scientific Reports.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.materialstoday.com

UK 3D printing and innovative technology show Advanced Engineering 2016 reported a record-breaking number of visitors globally. ‘Once again we have seen fantastic numbers walk through the doors, but importantly, not only have we had quantity, but also the level of quality visitor has remained very strong this year,’ said Matthew Benyon, managing director at Artexis Easyfairs UK and Global. Advanced Engineering also hosted the largest open conference of its kind, providing visitors with over 180 hours of case studies, supply chain opportunities, and market sector outlooks over the two days. The next Advanced Engineering UK will take place on 1 and 2 November 2017. This story is reprinted from material from Advanced Engineering, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

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