Boulder, CO, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Patent
Advanced Conductor Technologies LLC | Date: 2016-12-09

A cable machine system for winding conductive tapes or wires around a cable core includes a rotatable pickup spool for receiving and winding a cable. The system also includes a rotatable shaft having a central passage along its axial length, through which the cable core extends during a winding operation. At least one rotatable conductor spool is rotatable about a spool axis and holds a conductive tape or wire. Each rotatable conductor spool is attached to the rotatable shaft and rotatable about the axis of the rotatable shaft with rotation of the rotatable shaft. A tape or wire extends from each conductor spool to the cable core and is wound around the cable core as the rotatable shaft is rotated about its axis. At least one of the conductor spools, the rotatable shaft, and the rotatable pickup spool is coupled to a drive device through a self-locking mechanism to inhibit rotation of the at least one of the conductor spools, the rotatable shaft, and the rotatable pickup spool when the drive device is not activated.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2015

The Navy is interested in developing hybrid superconducting power transmission cables that would carry at least 5 kA of current and have a current density of at least 35 MA/m2. The cable should be able to carry 30 % of the rated current even when the superconducting cable fails. We propose to develop a hybrid superconducting cable, based on CORC cables, which potentially have a current density of 500 MA/mm2, while being extremely flexible. We will develop multiple cable designs, based on cold and warm dielectrics, and determine their feasibility for continuous operation at 30 % of rated current when the superconducting cable fails. A full-size hybrid power transmission cable will be delivered at the end of the proposed program.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2016

Future power systems on board Navy ships require electrical power in the order of 20 to 80 MW, which currently cant be provided by conventional copper or aluminum power cables. Advanced Conductor Technologies LLC (ACT) has been developing high-temperature superconducting Conductor on Round Core (CORC) power transmission cables, rated at 10 kA per phase, for the Navy that form a potential solution in which the required power can be transported in a lightweight and low-loss system. A significant challenge that needs to be overcome for CORC cables cooled with cryogenic helium gas is the ability to operate the cables at voltages exceeding 1 kV. Advanced Conductor Technologies, together with the Center for Advanced Power Systems (CAPS) at the Florida State University (FSU) and Georgia Institute of Technology propose to develop fully encapsulating dielectrics for use in cryogenic helium gas, enabling voltage operation of 20 kV, providing the CORC cable with a power rating of as high as 200 MW. We will determine feasible dielectric materials and application methods that would prevent helium penetration into the dielectric and would result in a robust and cost-effective fully encapsulated dielectric.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.99K | Year: 2013

The feasibility for fusion as a practical energy source needs to be enhanced significantly by removing some of the restrictions that low-temperature superconductors put on the fusion magnet systems. This can be done by using high-temperature superconductors, allowing for much larger temperature margins, a higher magnet performance and less mechanical degradation during operation. There are currently no feasible methods to construct HTS cables that have the performance and current homogeneity needed for fusion magnets. Advanced Conductor Technologies will develop high-temperature superconducting `Conductor-on-Round-Core cables, invented by the Principal Investigator, for use in fusion magnets. These cables will have a homogenous current distribution at high current ramp rates, a stable operation at elevated temperatures and high magnetic fields, and will be mechanically robust. During Phase I we have demonstrated the feasibility of Conductor-on-RoundCore cables for fusion applications. Weve shown, both analytically and experimentally, that the current distribution in these cables remains homogeneous at current ramp rates as high as 68,000 amperes per second. We also developed a cable with a record current carrying performance of 5,021 amperes in a background field of 19 teslas. During Phase II we propose to construct a six-aroundone cable, capable of carrying a current of over 60,000 A, by bundling six Conductor-on-RoundCore cables around a central cooling tube. The cable will be optimized to withstand the large forces during operation and to allow for operation at elevated temperatures. We will test the cable in flowing helium gas and at magnetic fields as high as 12 teslas. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: High-temperature superconducting magnet cables will enable more practical fusion magnets, the next generation of very high field scientific magnets, and magnets for grid energy storage and for proton cancer treatment facilities.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1000.00K | Year: 2014

Accelerator magnets that are currently being used in high-energy physics experiments are limited to a maximum magnetic field of about 20 T because superconductivity in the low- temperature superconductors (LTS) from which the magnets are constructed breaks down at higher fields. The only way to build the next generation of more powerful accelerator magnets is by using high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that can operate at magnetic fields of 20 T and above. There is currently no feasible method to bundle HTS into high-current cables that have an overall current density of at least 150 A/mm2 at 20 T that is required for the next generation of accelerator magnets. This proposal seeks to develop HTS cables that have a high current density needed for the next generation of superconducting accelerator magnets that operate at fields of 20 T and above. During Phase I, we demonstrated the feasibility of raising the critical current density at 20 T of conductor on round core (CORC) cables that were invented by the PI towards 200 A/mm2. During Phase II we will commercialize CORC cables that have a critical current density of at least 300 A/mm2 at 20 T from which the next generation of accelerator magnets can be built. We will accomplish this by optimizing the cable layout when using superconducting tapes that have thin layers of copper and contain thin substrates. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: High-temperature superconducting magnet cables with high current densities will enable the next generation of accelerator magnets for high-energy physics, proton cancer treatment facilities, and practical fusion magnets. These cables will also benefit superconducting magnetic energy storage systems for use in the power grid and for application within the Department of Defense.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1000.00K | Year: 2016

The feasibility of fusion as a practical energy source needs to be improved significantly by removing some of the restrictions that low temperature superconductors put on the fusion magnet systems. One method to simplify the magnet system is by using high temperature superconductors (HTS) that allow for a higher magnet performance and much larger temperature margins. Successful application of HTS in fusion magnets requires reliable, low resistance cable joints. There is currently no practical method of making reliable joints in high current HTS cables. This proposal seeks to develop reliable, low resistance joints between HTS magnet cables that would allow for practical fusion magnets to become a reality. Joints between magnet cables capable of carrying currents exceeding 60 kA will be developed into an industrial product with the goal of having a joint resistance of less than 10 nΩ at 4.220 K. During Phase I of the program, we demonstrated feasibility of our approach to make joints between HTS magnet cables and demonstrated a joint with resistance of 110 nΩ at 77 K in a subscale cable carrying 8 kA. We demonstrated that current was injected homogenously into the cable containing 111 superconducting tapes. During Phase II of the program, the joints will be further optimized to reduce the resistance to below 10 nΩ, while joints between cables containing as many as 400 superconducting tapes will be developed. Several full scale cables with joints will be constructed and their performance will be measured at 4.2 K while carrying currents in excess of 50 kA. Reliable, low resistance joints between high current HTS cables will enable compact fusion magnets, high field magnets for scientific experiments and the next generation of accelerator magnets for particle physics and proton cancer treatment facilities. They will also enable high density power transmission cables for Department of Defense applications. Key words Compact fusion magnets, high temperature superconducting cable joints, demountable fusion magnets. The development of practical and reliable joints between high temperature superconducting cables is necessary for the US to maintain their leadership position in fusion research, materials science, and high energy physics research.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

Accelerator magnets that are currently being used in high-­‐energy physics experiments are limited to a maximum magnetic field of less than 20 T because superconductivity in the low-­‐ temperature superconductors from which the magnets are constructed breaks down at higher fields. The next generation of accelerator magnets needs to be made from high-­‐temperature superconducting magnet cables. The requirement of operating these fragile materials at high current densities while experiencing high stresses makes this very challenging. This proposal seeks to develop high-­‐temperature superconducting CORC® magnet wires that would enable the next generation of accelerator magnets that operate at 20 T and above. They will be tailored for use in canted cosine theta accelerator magnets, which is a design in which the stresses on the conductor are limited. During Phase I of the program, we will develop CORC® wires with a current density of at least 300 A/mm2 at 4.2 K and 20 T, while ensuring that they retain at least 80 % of the performance when bent to a diameter of less than 40 mm. We will design a canted cosine theta insert magnet based on CORC® wires, which would be operated inside an outsert made from low temperature superconductors, with the goal to increase the total magnetic field to at least 20 T. The CORC® wire performance will be increased to 600 A/mm2 at 20 T and several prototype canted cosine theta insert magnets will be constructed and tested during Phase II of the program. The development of high current density magnet wires made from high-­‐temperature superconductor and magnets wound from these wires is necessary for the US to maintain their leadership position in superconductivity research, materials science, and high-­‐energy physics research. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: High-­‐temperature superconducting magnet wires that have a high current density at 20 T, while being bendable to diameters less than 40 mm, will enable some of the next generation of high-­‐ energy physics magnets, proton cancer treatment facilities, practical fusion magnets, and scientific magnets. These magnets will also benefit superconducting magnetic energy storage systems for use in the power grid and for application within the Department of Defense.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

The feasibility of fusion as a practical energy source needs to be improved significantly by removing some of the restrictions that low temperature superconductors put on the fusion magnet systems. One method to simplify the magnet system is by using high temperature superconductors that allow for a higher magnet performance and much larger temperature margins. The larger temperature margins allow for superconducting demountable fusion magnets, which would significantly reduce the magnet construction complexity and maintenance time and costs. There are currently no feasible methods to construct demountable fusion magnets from superconducting cables. This proposal seeks to develop methods to develop low loss joints for use in high temperature superconducting cables, allowing development of demountable superconducting fusion magnets. During Phase I, we will determine the feasibility of making practical and reliable joints in high temperature superconducting cables that carry as much as 5 kA in a background field of 14 T. During Phase II we will further optimize the joint structure such that it can be applied to cables that carry 60 kA in 14 T background field. Reliable low loss joints in high temperature superconducting cables will enable demountable fusion magnets that are less complex to construct and easier to repair and maintain than conventional fusion magnets. Demountable cable joints will directly benefit other applications, such as high energy density, superconducting power transmission on board of Navy vessels, Air Force aircraft and data centers.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2014

The Navy has expressed interest in shipboard high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems for power transmission and degaussing purposes. The practical application of such cable systems require flexible superconducting cables and cable connectors that allow for a quick and reliable installation into, or removal from, its pre-installed cryostat. Advanced Conductor Technologies LLC (ACT) of Boulder, Colorado and the Center for Advanced Power Systems at Florida State University propose to develop flexible Conductor on Round Core (CORC) cables and reliable, low-loss CORC cable terminations and connections for their application in shipboard helium gas-cooled power transmission systems. The CORC cable that is being commercialized by ACT is currently the only HTS cable that is flexible enough to be pulled through a pre-installed cryostat. During the Phase II program, we will design and construct CORC cables, terminations and connectors for 2-phase dc and 3-phase ac power transmission.


Patent
Advanced Conductor Technologies LLC | Date: 2016-05-27

A cable machine system for winding conductive tapes or wires around a cable core includes a rotatable pickup spool for receiving and winding a cable. The system also includes a rotatable shaft having a central passage along its axial length, through which the cable core extends during a winding operation. At least one rotatable conductor spool is rotatable about a spool axis and holds a conductive tape or wire. Each rotatable conductor spool is attached to the rotatable shaft and rotatable about the axis of the rotatable shaft with rotation of the rotatable shaft. A tape or wire extends from each conductor spool to the cable core and is wound around the cable core as the rotatable shaft is rotated about its axis.

Loading Advanced Conductor Technologies LLC collaborators
Loading Advanced Conductor Technologies LLC collaborators