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Tucson, AZ, United States

Gangireddy S.,University of Michigan | Halloran J.W.,University of Michigan | Wing Z.N.,Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Inc.
Journal of the European Ceramic Society | Year: 2013

Flexural creep of ZrB2-30vol% SiC ultra high temperature ceramic composite was studied at 1700-2200°C and 20-50MPa using the novel method of electromagnetic Lorentz force loading of electrically heated specimens. Experiments were conducted in air and in non-oxidizing atmospheres. The apparent activation energy for creep was 344±35kJ/mol for non-oxidizing conditions. The stress exponent was 1.4±0.4. The creep rate was slightly higher in air due to a decrease in the size of the load bearing substrate because of oxidation. There was no evidence of electric field effects. Creep experiments could be performed up to 2200°C very quickly, with experiments conducted in a few minutes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE II | Award Amount: 784.00K | Year: 2014

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will develop materials and processes that enable any composite resin system to be produced Out Of Autoclave (OOA) with excellent inner and outer surfaces. To ensure high quality and reliability, aerospace composites are processed inside autoclaves that combine heat and pressure. The capital and labor costs and manufacturing times associated with autoclave processing are significant but necessary to ensure composite quality. Achieving high-complexity geometries poses additional hurdles. Current methods used in these cases include a small selection of OOA pre-impregnated parts, the use of thermoplastic bladders, or the bonding of autoclaved components. A large opportunity exists for OOA technology to reduce material and labor costs while also enabling one piece, seamless composite structures with extremely complex internal & external geometries, allowing manufacturing of parts which were previously unachievable. The Phase II project will further the development of a self-pressurizing technology that allows OOA processing of any resin system without a loss in quality. The Phase II will expand the operating temperature and pressure window, improve forming processes, and characterize performance on commercially relevant pre-impregnated systems. Phase II results will yield a mature forming process and several tooling grades with verified performance.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is the realization of a manufacturing technology that will enable the composites industry to form more complex geometries and allow greater competition throughout the industry. Society will see benefits through the broader use of fuel-efficient composites in air and land based vehicles and smaller carbon waste streams. The use of advanced fiber reinforced composites in aircraft has become a necessity to achieve higher performance and greater fuel efficiencies. Boeings 787 and Airbuss A350 are two such aircraft that exemplify the push to increase composite content above 50% by weight. The proposed technology will impact new aircraft as well as the design and manufacture of other vehicles. Technologically, this project will lead to a better understanding of self-pressurizing materials and their potential applications, as well as advance domestic manufacturing capabilities. Finally, undergraduates at the University of Arizona will have an opportunity to work on the project in conjunction with industrial scientists and engineers.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.99K | Year: 2014

Legacy refractory materials that have origins dating to the original Saturn program are commonly used in current launch facilities. Although they fail to meet the target requirements, they are the only approved material. Our research team has demonstrated a baseline system during the Phase I effort that combines a non-cement binder, a high temperature macro aggregate, and reactive nano aggregates to produce an Ultra High Temperature Refractory (UHTR). Our UHTR system has sustained short term exposures to 3000C in a laboratory test and excellent resistance to environmental aging. The Phase II effort will optimize the mechanical and thermal behavior based on rocket plume exposure testing.


Patent
Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Inc. | Date: 2010-06-04

A method for forming a composite structure, using a mandrel that is later removed from the composite structure, involves production of a mandrel by depositing a particulate mixture, including an aggregate and a binder, into a mold and removing the mandrel from the mold. The mandrel may be treated while still in the mold by heating, curing with an agent, microwave energy, or by some combination thereof. Once finished, the mandrel can be used in manufacturing polymer and/or composite components. The mandrel can also be include materials that can be easily removed from the finished composite structure by water, shakeout, chemically dissolving, or by some combination thereof


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 179.96K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project seeks to develop materials and manufacturing processes that enable aerospace composite materials to be produced without an autoclave. To ensure the best material quality and reliability, aerospace composites are processed inside autoclaves that combine heat and pressure to fully bond multi-layered composites. Autoclaves that can accommodate aircraft fuselages and wings now exist. The capital costs, labor costs, and manufacturing times associated with autoclave processing are significant but are a necessary evil to ensure composite quality. A large opportunity exists for Out Of Autoclave (OOA) technology to reduce costs and streamline composite manufacturing operations. The current OOA focus of industry is to develop new resin/fabric systems that can be processed OOA but still yield suitable performance. A better approach to achieve broad-based OOA manufacturing is to compatibilize existing resin/fabric systems. This goal may be achieved through a combination of new tooling materials and manufacturing processes that can self-pressurize and consolidate composites. The results of the Phase I effort will demonstrate a true OOA technique that allows autoclave equivalent composite properties to be achieved in any existing resin/fabric system without the use of autoclave.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to provide the composites industry with an OOA solution that is resin independent. The use of advanced fiber reinforced composites in aircraft has become a necessity to achieve higher performance and greater fuel efficiencies. Boeings 787 and Airbus A350 are two such aircraft that exemplify the push to increase composite content above 50% by weight. A large opportunity exists for OOA technology to reduce costs and streamline composite manufacturing operations. The OOA technology developed in Phase I will have a large impact on the composites industry through cost reduction and manufacturing efficiency gains. It will allow a broader manufacturing base to produce autoclave-like parts. Society will see benefits through the broader use of fuel-efficient composites in air- and land-based vehicles. This effort will also foster collaboration between small business and large aerospace manufacturers as well as offer undergraduate and high school students an opportunity to work on the project.

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