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Mogawer W.S.,University of Massachusetts Dartmouth | Austerman A.J.,University of Massachusetts Dartmouth | Bonaquist R.,Advanced Asphalt Technologies
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2012

The purpose of this research study was to evaluate the effects of plant type and roduction parameters on the stiffness, performance, and degree of blending between the aged and virgin binders of plant-produced reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) mixtures. Mixtures from a batch and a drum plant and the corresponding production information were obtained. The stiffness of each mixture was evaluated by measuring the dynamic modulus. Moisture susceptibility and rutting potential were evaluated with the Hamburg wheel tracking device. Low-temperature cracking characteristics were evaluated with the asphalt concrete cracking device. Finally, the workability of the mixtures was evaluated with an asphalt workability device. Binder was extracted from each mixture to measure the degree of blending between the aged and virgin binder. The degree of blending between the aged RAP and virgin binder in each mixture was evaluated with an analysis approach that used the ratio of the mixture dynamic modulus to the recovered binder shear modulus. Batch and drum plants produced RAP mixtures that performed similarly to the control mixtures and exhibited good blending. None of the RAP mixture tested showed increased susceptibility to moisture damage, rutting, and low-temperature cracking susceptibility as the RAP content was increased. Workability testing identified a potential construction issue as the mixture workability decreased as the amount of RAP in the mixture increased. Finally, the performance data indicated the importance of the proper virgin binder grade selection for mixtures with higher amounts of RAP. Source


Trewella J.C.,PetroTech Consultants LLC | Bonaquist R.,Advanced Asphalt Technologies | Sanchez V.,Kior
Asphalt Paving Technology: Association of Asphalt Paving Technologists-Proceedings of the Technical Sessions | Year: 2012

The production of renewable liquid transportation fuels is growing rapidly, particularly in the United States and Europe. This paper examines the potential for using co-products from this rapidly growing manufacturing base as blending components in asphalt. Several blends of biofuel co-products in a paving grade asphalt binder were prepared and performance grading properties were measured. Asphalt concrete mixtures using the various blends and a somewhat moisture sensitive aggregate were tested in accordance with AASHTO T283 to evaluate resistance to moisture damage. Initial laboratory findings indicate that some of these materials may be useful as binder extenders, having minimal impact on the performance grade while imparting added benefits. Source


Mogawer W.,University of Massachusetts Dartmouth | Bennert T.,Rutgers University | Daniel J.S.,University of New Hampshire | Bonaquist R.,Advanced Asphalt Technologies | And 2 more authors.
Asphalt Paving Technology: Association of Asphalt Paving Technologists-Proceedings of the Technical Sessions | Year: 2012

The main focus of this study was to obtain plant-produced Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP) mixtures, to document the mixtures production parameters and to evaluate the degree of blending between the virgin and RAP binders. The effect of mixture production parameters on the performance (in terms of stiffness, cracking, rutting and moisture susceptibility) and workability of the mixtures was evaluated. Eighteen plant-produced mixtures were obtained from three locations in the Northeast United State. RAP contents (0 to 40&) were varied and softer binders were used. The data and analysis illustrated that the degree of blending between RAP and virgin binders is a function of production parameters. The stiffness of the mixtures increased as the percent of RAP increased, but not when the discharge temperatures of the mixtures were inconsistent. The cracking resistance was reduced as the percent of RAP increased. The rutting and moisture damage resistance improved as the percent of RAP in the mixtures increased. Finally, reheating the mixtures in the laboratory caused a significant increase in the stiffness of the mixtures. Source


Haggag M.M.,University of Massachusetts Dartmouth | Mogawer W.S.,University of Massachusetts Dartmouth | Bonaquist R.,Advanced Asphalt Technologies
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2011

Warm-mix asphalt (WMA) is the generic term used to refer to a group of technologies that are used to produce asphalt pavement mixtures at temperatures lower than those of traditional hot-mix asphalt (HMA). One of the potential benefits of WMA is that it provides better fatigue cracking characteristics than does HMA. The lower temperatures should reduce the aging of asphalt binders that occur during production. The reduced aging of asphalt binders should lead to improved fatigue characteristics of asphalt mixtures. The research reported here addressed two main objectives. The first was to study the impacts of three WMA technologies on the fatigue cracking resistance of HMA by using one asphalt binder and two aggregate sources. The fatigue characteristics were measured by using a uniaxial, cyclic, direct tension compression test. The second objective was to analyze the data produced by the test by using the simplified viscoelastic continuum damage approach proposed in the NCHRP 9-43 Phase I report. Three WMA technologies were used: Advera, Evotherm 3G, and Sasobit. All mixtures were produced by using a PG 64-22 virgin binder. Data showed no significant difference between HMA mixtures and WMA mixtures for each mix except for the Advera. Source


Mogawer W.S.,University of Massachusetts Dartmouth | Austerman A.J.,University of Massachusetts Dartmouth | Bonaquist R.,Advanced Asphalt Technologies | Roussel M.,University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2011

This study designed and evaluated the performance of thin-lift mixtures that incorporated a high reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) content, recycled asphalt shingles (RAS), and a warm-mix asphalt (WMA) technology, both individually and collectively. A Superpave® 9.5-mm mixture was designed with new materials and designated as the control mixture. The same control mixture was developed with 40% RAP, with 5% RAS, and with 35% RAP and 5% RAS. Each of the mixture designs was then repeated at a lower mixing and compaction temperature according to a wax-based WMA technology. The effect of the RAP, RAS, or both on the stiffness of each mixture was measured by using the dynamic modulus. The performance of each mixture was determined by measuring (a) its reflective cracking resistance with an overlay tester, (b) its lowtemperature cracking resistance with an asphalt concrete cracking device, and (c) its moisture susceptibility with a Hamburg wheel tracking device. In addition, binder was extracted from each mixture and the performance grade determined. The mixtures that incorporated high RAP content, RAS, or both exhibited higher stiffness, which was confirmed with the extracted binder grading results. The use of RAP, RAS, or both reduced the reflective cracking resistance but did not have a negative impact on the low-temperature cracking resistance of the mixtures. Moisture susceptibility test results indicated that the addition of RAP, RAS, or both improved the mixtures' resistance to moisture failure. The addition of WMA technology to the mixtures provided similar or improved performance in most of the mixture tests. Source

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