Adult Nephrology Unit and

West Jerusalem, Israel

Adult Nephrology Unit and

West Jerusalem, Israel
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Shavit L.,Adult Nephrology Unit and | Tauber R.,Shaare Zedek Medical Center | Lifschitz M.,Adult Nephrology Unit and | Bitran D.,Shaare Zedek Medical Center | And 2 more authors.
Kidney and Blood Pressure Research | Year: 2012

Background/Aims: Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are high in patients with chronic kidney disease. We evaluated the influence of small differences in preoperative kidney function on mortality and complications following cardiac surgery. Methods: This is an observational study that included adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was estimated by the 4-component Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations based on preoperative creatinine levels. For analysis, patients were divided into groups according to their preoperative creatinine (0.2 mg/dl increments) and eGFR levels (15-30 ml/min/1.73 m2 decrements). Results: Data on 5,340 patients were analyzed. A significant increase in postoperative mortality was demonstrated with preoperative creatinine at high-normal versus low-normal values (OR 1.7, 95% CI: 1-2.5; p = 0.02). For preoperative creatinine >1.2 mg/dl, adjusted OR for in-hospital mortality increased stepwise with every 0.2-mg/dl increment of creatinine. In addition, a statistically significant increment of mortality was detected with every 15-ml/min/1.73 m2 decrement in preoperative eGFR. Conclusions: Minimal changes of preoperative kidney function are associated with a substantial increase in the risk of mortality and morbidity following cardiac surgery. Even within the 'normal' range, minimal increases in serum creatinine levels are associated with increased risk of adverse events postoperatively. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.


PubMed | Adult Nephrology Unit and and Shaare Zedek Medical Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN | Year: 2014

Preoperative anemia adversely affects outcomes of cardiothoracic surgery. However, in patients with CKD, treating anemia to a target of normal hemoglobin has been associated with increased risk of adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events. We investigated the association between preoperative hemoglobin and outcomes of cardiac surgery in patients with CKD and assessed whether there was a level of preoperative hemoglobin below which the incidence of adverse surgical outcomes increases.This prospective observational study included adult patients with CKD stages 3-5 (eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) undergoing cardiac surgery from February 2000 to January 2010. Patients were classified into four groups stratified by preoperative hemoglobin level: <10, 10-11.9, 12-13.9, and 14 g/dl. The outcomes were postoperative AKI requiring dialysis, sepsis, cerebrovascular accident, and mortality.In total, 788 patients with a mean eGFR of 43.5 3.7 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) were evaluated, of whom 22.5% had preoperative hemoglobin within the normal range (men: 14-18 g/dl; women: 12-16 g/dl). Univariate analysis revealed an inverse relationship between the incidence of all adverse postoperative outcomes and hemoglobin level. Using hemoglobin as a continuous variable, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a proportionally greater frequency of all adverse postoperative outcomes per 1-g/dl decrement of preoperative hemoglobin (mortality: odds ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.23 to 1.57; P<0.001; sepsis: odds ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 1.14 to 1.49; P<0.001; cerebrovascular accident: odds ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 to 1.67; P=0.03; postoperative hemodialysis: odds ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.75; P<0.01). Moreover, preoperative hemoglobin<12 g/dl was an independent risk factor for postoperative mortality (odds ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 7.3; P=0.04).Similar to the general population, preoperative anemia is associated with adverse postoperative outcomes in patients with CKD. Whether outcomes could be improved by therapeutically targeting higher preoperative hemoglobin levels before cardiac surgery in patients with underlying CKD remains to be determined.

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