Administrative Bureau of Shennongjia National Nature Reserve

Hugang, China

Administrative Bureau of Shennongjia National Nature Reserve

Hugang, China
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Zhang H.,CAS Wuhan Institute of Hydrobiology | Cai Q.,CAS Wuhan Institute of Hydrobiology | Liao M.,Administrative Bureau of Shennongjia National Nature Reserve
International Journal of Odonatology | Year: 2013

Three new Cephalaeschna species, C. discolor sp. nov. (holotype male; Shennongjia National Nature Reserve, Shennongjia City, Hubei province, China, 16 August 2012), C. mattii sp. nov. (holotype male; Lujiahe River, Zigui County, Hubei province, China,18 September 2012) and C. solitaria sp. nov. (holotype male; Dalongtan in Shennongjia National Nature Reserve, Shennongjia City, Hubei province, China, 19 July 2012) are described, illustrated in color and compared with the known Chinese Cephalaeschna. All the holotypes are deposited in the Collection ofAquaticAnimals, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. The hitherto unknown male of C. obversa and female of C. patrorum are also described and illustrated. Brief notes on biology of each species are also provided. © 2013 Worldwide Dragonfly Association.


He F.,CAS Wuhan Institute of Hydrobiology | He F.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Ren Z.,CAS Wuhan Institute of Hydrobiology | Ren Z.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | And 6 more authors.
Chinese Journal of Applied and Environmental Biology | Year: 2014

An investigation was carried out in May 2011 and April 2012 in order to assess the effects of anthropogenic disturbance on physicochemical characteristics and organisms of rivers in the Shennongjia Forest Region. Based on water quality, Shannon-Wiener index of macroinvertebrates and Biological Monitoring Working Party (BMWP) Score System, ecosystem health of 30 river sites in the Shennongjia Forest Region were evaluated. Water quality of river sites in the Shennongjia Forest Region indicated that 36.67% of all sample sites were "healthy"; Shannon-Wiener index showed 63.30% of them "healthy"; while BMWP score indicated the percentage of "healthy" sites as 50%. There was a significant liner relationship between the evaluation of Shannon-Wiener index and BMWP score (P < 0.01), demonstrating that it was possible to use the two indices to monitor and assess the river ecosystem health in the Shennongjia Forest Region. According to the results of the three methods combined, 66.67% of all sample sites were "subhealthy" and "healthy", indicating the river ecosystem in the Shennongjia Forest Region is generally healthy.


Liu X.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Li F.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Jiang J.,Administrative Bureau of Shennongjia National Nature Reserve | Wang X.,Administrative Bureau of Shennongjia National Nature Reserve | Li Y.,CAS Institute of Zoology
Primates | Year: 2016

Age-sex differences in diet have been reported in many nonhuman primates, and body size, reproductive costs, and growth are three mutually non-exclusive factors often proposed to explain such differences. Smaller animals tend to feed on high quality foods (high in protein/energy) more often than larger animals due to their higher metabolic requirements per body weight. Animals of different sizes tend to use different substrate levels, leading to dietary differences if food resources are unevenly distributed along substrate levels. Adult females and juveniles experience additional metabolic requirements for reproduction and growth, respectively, and tend to feed on high quality foods more frequently than adult males. We conducted an age-sex analysis for the diet of Sichuan snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in Shennongjia, China. In spite of general age-sex similarities, we found that adult males ate herbs more frequently than juveniles and adult females, most likely because they were more terrestrial. As predicted, juveniles ate high quality foods (young leaves, fruits, seeds, and buds) more frequently, and meanwhile ate low quality foods (barks and lichens) less frequently than adult males across the study year or in some seasons when these food types were eaten. However, we found high similarities in diet between adult females and adult males. The most likely reason was that the low diversity of food sources and strong phenological synchrony did not allow adult females to select foods based on quality to cope with their higher metabolic constraints compared to adult males. Surprisingly, the only sex difference in diet except herbs was that adult females ate lichens more frequently in autumn. One plausible reason was that lactating females experienced their highest metabolic requirements in the middle period of infant care (autumn), and had to disproportionately increase the intake of lichens due to the limited availability of plant foods. © 2016 Japan Monkey Centre and Springer Japan


PubMed | University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, CAS Institute of Zoology and Administrative Bureau of Shennongjia National Nature Reserve
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Primates; journal of primatology | Year: 2016

Age-sex differences in diet have been reported in many nonhuman primates, and body size, reproductive costs, and growth are three mutually non-exclusive factors often proposed to explain such differences. Smaller animals tend to feed on high quality foods (high in protein/energy) more often than larger animals due to their higher metabolic requirements per body weight. Animals of different sizes tend to use different substrate levels, leading to dietary differences if food resources are unevenly distributed along substrate levels. Adult females and juveniles experience additional metabolic requirements for reproduction and growth, respectively, and tend to feed on high quality foods more frequently than adult males. We conducted an age-sex analysis for the diet of Sichuan snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in Shennongjia, China. In spite of general age-sex similarities, we found that adult males ate herbs more frequently than juveniles and adult females, most likely because they were more terrestrial. As predicted, juveniles ate high quality foods (young leaves, fruits, seeds, and buds) more frequently, and meanwhile ate low quality foods (barks and lichens) less frequently than adult males across the study year or in some seasons when these food types were eaten. However, we found high similarities in diet between adult females and adult males. The most likely reason was that the low diversity of food sources and strong phenological synchrony did not allow adult females to select foods based on quality to cope with their higher metabolic constraints compared to adult males. Surprisingly, the only sex difference in diet except herbs was that adult females ate lichens more frequently in autumn. One plausible reason was that lactating females experienced their highest metabolic requirements in the middle period of infant care (autumn), and had to disproportionately increase the intake of lichens due to the limited availability of plant foods.

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