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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

London, United Kingdom, May 09, 2017 --( The company is looking for partners such as Storage Resellers/VARs, System Integrators, Managed Service & Infrastructure Providers and Consultants, with experience across one or more fields of storage and data management technologies. “As the market moves faster towards commoditised storage, open source and cloud-based storage, channel margins are suffering. Even the incumbent proprietary storage vendors are axing prices and margins to compete,” comments David Gillard, Pydio CEO. “Pydio offers a near-risk-free way for channel partners to turn commodity storage into a sophisticated file sharing solution, delivering added customer value with the potential to earn extra margins. And as data protection regulations increase, the many companies that have relied on consumer-focus online solutions such as DropBox and Google Drive, will need to switch to Enterprise-grade alternatives.” Pydio works internationally from its base in Paris, France. However, in order to get closer to its UK customer base and extend it, the company wants partners with local expertise and a wide portfolio to address the file sharing and synchronisation market. Pydio offers customers the most advanced, open source file sharing and synchronisation platform, giving channel partners and service providers the ability to deliver significant value-add to their existing offerings. The company’s flexible support options and Pydio Enterprise Distribution, then gives partners a chance to earn additional commission from upselling customers that require additional features for managing larger numbers of users, maintaining tighter control of company data and delivering reports and audits or regulatory compliance. The nascent channel programme offers UK partners the ability to negotiate deals on a per-company or per-case basis, giving greater opportunities to those companies committed to selling the solution. Other benefits include marketing and technical support. “Strengthening our partners programme in the UK channel is an important part of our business growth strategy. Our aim is to reach new customers and help them realise their file sharing and synchronisation goals,” adds David Gillard, Co-founder Pydio. In the coming months, Pydio will also be expanding its partner network in various other EMEA countries. About Pydio Pydio is the world’s largest Open Source file sharing and synchronization focused project for the enterprise. Pydio is a founder's owned company. The Pydio Project delivers a sustainable balance between enterprise customers needs and Open-Source collaborative spirit. Sold in 25 countries, from Cupertino to Singapore, Pydio is used by leading brands such as Nikon, Ion Geophysical, and Guitar Center. Pydio also serves education and government clients such as Cambridge University (UK) and ADEME (France). It currently has over one million downloads. London, United Kingdom, May 09, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Pydio, the most popular, open source file sharing & sync solution is looking to strengthen its UK partner network: offering a new, low risk source of value-add and revenue, in a market suffering ever-shrinking margins.The company is looking for partners such as Storage Resellers/VARs, System Integrators, Managed Service & Infrastructure Providers and Consultants, with experience across one or more fields of storage and data management technologies.“As the market moves faster towards commoditised storage, open source and cloud-based storage, channel margins are suffering. Even the incumbent proprietary storage vendors are axing prices and margins to compete,” comments David Gillard, Pydio CEO. “Pydio offers a near-risk-free way for channel partners to turn commodity storage into a sophisticated file sharing solution, delivering added customer value with the potential to earn extra margins. And as data protection regulations increase, the many companies that have relied on consumer-focus online solutions such as DropBox and Google Drive, will need to switch to Enterprise-grade alternatives.”Pydio works internationally from its base in Paris, France. However, in order to get closer to its UK customer base and extend it, the company wants partners with local expertise and a wide portfolio to address the file sharing and synchronisation market.Pydio offers customers the most advanced, open source file sharing and synchronisation platform, giving channel partners and service providers the ability to deliver significant value-add to their existing offerings. The company’s flexible support options and Pydio Enterprise Distribution, then gives partners a chance to earn additional commission from upselling customers that require additional features for managing larger numbers of users, maintaining tighter control of company data and delivering reports and audits or regulatory compliance.The nascent channel programme offers UK partners the ability to negotiate deals on a per-company or per-case basis, giving greater opportunities to those companies committed to selling the solution. Other benefits include marketing and technical support.“Strengthening our partners programme in the UK channel is an important part of our business growth strategy. Our aim is to reach new customers and help them realise their file sharing and synchronisation goals,” adds David Gillard, Co-founder Pydio.In the coming months, Pydio will also be expanding its partner network in various other EMEA countries.About PydioPydio is the world’s largest Open Source file sharing and synchronization focused project for the enterprise. Pydio is a founder's owned company. The Pydio Project delivers a sustainable balance between enterprise customers needs and Open-Source collaborative spirit. Sold in 25 countries, from Cupertino to Singapore, Pydio is used by leading brands such as Nikon, Ion Geophysical, and Guitar Center. Pydio also serves education and government clients such as Cambridge University (UK) and ADEME (France). It currently has over one million downloads. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Pydio


News Article | November 24, 2015
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Hyundai Motor America picks AeroVironment to provide dealer charging stations for 2016 Sonata Plug-in Hybrid | Main | BASF announces winners of the open innovation contest on energy storage » Global Bioenergies has reached two milestones—the labscale performance and the industrial process scale-up—of its process to produce renewable isobutene, one of them more than 2 months in advance. The BioMA+ project is financed by the ADEME in the context of the French “Investissements d’Avenir” State program. The project targets the development of a value chain that converts renewable resources into isobutene and subsequently into methacrylic acid, an essential component of acrylic paints. These milestones give rise to a payment of €879,000 (US$936,000). Since 2008, Global Bioenergies has been developing an innovative process to convert renewable resources into isobutene, one of the main building blocks of the petrochemical industry from which fuels, plastics and rubbers are made. In 2013, the Company announced that, as part of its “Investissements d’Avenir” program, the French government had granted financing of €5.2 million (US$5.5 million) to a consortium bringing together Arkema, the French center for scientific research (CNRS) and Global Bioenergies. The project involves developing and demonstrating at pilot scale a process for converting renewable resources (sugar, cereals, agricultural and forestry wastes) into isobutene, which is subsequently converted into methacrylic acid, an essential component of acrylic paints and for which there is a market of more than €500 million. At the beginning of 2015, Global Bioenergies announced having reached the project’s first milestone and having received payments totaling €2.3 million (US$2.5 million) from the overall amount of €4 million (US$4.3 million) directly allocated to the Company. In recent months we have made very significant progress in industrializing our isobutene process. We are already preparing the next phase, which will consist in operating our process in our demonstration plant, which is currently under construction at the Leuna site in Germany. This will be the last stage before large-scale commercial operations. The installation of a first plant in France is already being discussed within the context of the IBN-One Joint Venture, started this year with the Cristal Union Group.


Montpellier, December 14, 2016 - DEINOVE (Alternext Paris: ALDEI), a biotech company that discovers, develops and produces high value compounds from rare bacteria, notably from the Deinococcus genus, announces that it has validated the 3rd key milestone of its DEINOCHEM program, dedicated to the bio-based production of carotenoids and financed by ADEME (the French Environment and Energy Management Agency) under the "Investissements d'Avenir" (Investments for the Future) program. This new key milestone validates the technical progress made in developing the carotenoid production process. The target thresholds for productivity and yield have been reached using optimized Deinococcus strains on the laboratory scale. Beyond genetic engineering, the following steps are already underway: -          Development of a carotenoid extraction and purification process from the fermentation medium to obtain a marketable product; -          Scale up of the carotenoid production process for industrial use; -          Identification and selection of subcontractors ensuring rapid start-up for production. The Company's ambition is to market its first batches of the target compounds in 2018, and last November it announced[1] that it had selected Processium, an expert in industrial process engineering, to work with on these developments. "We are highly satisfied with these results, which validate the progress obtained in developing our bio-based carotenoids and confirm our strategic choices to refocus our activities on molecules with high added value," declared Emmanuel Petiot, CEO of DEINOVE. "Carotenoids represent market opportunities worth several hundreds of millions of dollars in a wide range of applications in healthcare, nutrition and cosmetics. We are more than ever focused on getting to the market quickly." In accordance with the aid agreement signed in 2013[2], ADEME's validation that the expected results have been obtained for the deliverables intended in Key Milestone 3 resulted in the payment, early December, of approximately €0.8 million in repayable advances. The DEINOCHEM program targets the production of carotenoids, compounds that are naturally found in many living beings and widely used in industry for their coloring and antioxidant properties. The worldwide carotenoid market is expected to reach $1.8 billion by 2019[3]. In 2013, Europe was the largest market, followed by North America. Applications for these molecules are becoming increasingly diversified in human and animal food, as well as in cosmetics and healthcare. The largest share of production comes from petroleum derivatives, but natural molecules are generating the strongest growth, notably due to consumer demand. Today, there are several production techniques such as extraction from tomatoes (lycopene) or paprika (capsanthin) and bioproduction from algae (astaxanthin) or microorganisms (beta-carotene). The supply of bio-based solutions is nonetheless limited due to their high production costs. DEINOVE's objective is to provide industrials with a competitive, bio-based alternative by developing a carotenoid biotechnological production process and offering significant advantages in terms of supply stability and quality, natural resource conservation and costs. DEINOCHEM, which is expected to require a total investment of €15.9 million by 2018, benefits from €5.9 million in financial support over 3 ans a half years from ADEME and CGI as part of the "Investissements d'Avenir" (Investments for the Future) program. DEINOVE (Alternext Paris: ALDEI) is a biotech company that discovers, develops and produces compounds with industrial value from rare microorganisms, for the healthcare, nutrition and cosmetics markets. These innovative production methods represent a sustainable and competitive alternative. For this, DEINOVE relies on two key assets: Based in Montpellier, DEINOVE employs approximately 50 employees and has nearly 170 international patent applications. The Company has been listed on Alternext since April 2010.


The Government and Alstom present the progress of the commitments made for the maintenance of railway and industrial activities at the Belfort site 17 February 2017 - Christophe SIRUGUE, Minister of State for Industry, and Henri POUPART-LAFARGE, Chairman and CEO of Alstom, presented today in Paris the progress of the commitments made by the Government and Alstom for the maintenance of rail and industrial activities at the Belfort site. For the second time, they convened the national monitoring committee, which brings together the State, the management and trade unions of the Alstom group, as well as the elected representatives of the territory of Belfort and the Burgundy-Franche-Comté region. The local committee, bringing together local elected representatives, trade unions, Alstom and the State services in the regions, was convened on 6 February under the authority of the Prefect of the Territory of Belfort. The diversification of the Belfort site, in particular the services and maintenance activities, continues: since October 2016, Alstom has already invested one million euros in the development of a new industrial building dedicated to maintenance. On 6 February 2017 the State, local authorities, SNCF Réseau and Alstom signed a financing agreement for the electrification of the site's test track. These investments underline Alstom's decision to create a European locomotive maintenance centre in Belfort. Akiem, a subsidiary of the SNCF group and Deutsch Asset Management, plans to entrust the maintenance of 23 locomotives to the Belfort site. This choice highlights the commitment to turn the Belfort site into the Alstom group's centre of reference for locomotive maintenance in Europe. The decision will be formalised by Akiem before 15 March. In parallel, SNCF Réseau confirms its need for 20 emergency locomotives, the acquisition procedure of which will be decided in the coming weeks. The State will continue to accompany Alstom in the development of the bimodal locomotives, both through the support of the ADEME for the development of this new platform, decided last autumn and representing four million euros, and through export markets on which the company can position itself. SNCF Mobilités has confirmed that it will buy 15 Euroduplex TGV trainsets to modernise its train fleet. The acquisition decision will be made at the Board of Directors' meeting to be held on 23 February. SNCF Mobilités and Alstom are continuing to hold discussions over the trains destined for the Paris-Milan line, their characteristics, the business plan and financing. Key steps have also been taken to develop the TGV of the Future as part of the innovation partnership between Alstom and SNCF. The acquisition of the thirty regional TET trains (trains d'équilbre du territoire) was decided by the Passengers' Committee of SNCF Mobilités on 7 December and the financing voted at the AFITF Board of Directors' meeting on 31 January 2017. Notification of the order will be given before 10 March, just after the signing of the TET agreement between the State and SNCF. The Government and the Chairman and CEO of Alstom welcome the achievement of several major milestones in the continuity plan for the rail activities of the Belfort site and will continue to pay close attention to its implementation. Henri POUPART-LAFARGE said: "In line with the commitments made on 4 October, Alstom is investing in the creation of a European centre of excellence for maintenance in Belfort. This is reflected in the implementation of several Alstom investments, including the reconstruction of a test track on the site announced last week." "The implementation of the continuity plan for the railway activities at Belfort is progressing and reflects the strong commitment of the Government to fulfil the commitments made. I am particularly attached to the growth of the new activities of the site, which will participate, alongside orders, in ensuring the continuity of Alstom's site at Belfort. I will of course pay close attention to the continuation of our collective efforts in this direction," said Christophe SIRUGUE. About Alstom As a promoter of sustainable mobility, Alstom develops and markets systems, equipment and services for the railway sector. Alstom manages the widest range of solutions in the market - from high-speed trains to metros and tramways - customised services (maintenance, modernisation,...) and infrastructure and signalling solutions. Alstom is a world leader in integrated railway systems. It recorded sales of €6.9 billion and booked €10.6 billion of orders in the 2015/16 fiscal year. Headquartered in France, Alstom is present in over 60 countries and employs 31,000 people today. Alstom's employees in France total approximately 8,800, providing a pool of expertise to serve French and international clients. A job at Alstom creates about three amongst its suppliers.  www.alstom.com A propos d'Alstom Promoteur de la mobilité durable, Alstom conçoit et propose des systèmes, équipements et services pour le secteur ferroviaire. Alstom offre la gamme de solutions la plus large du marché - des trains à grande vitesse aux métros et tramways - des services personnalisés (maintenance, modernisation,.) ainsi que des solutions d'infrastructure et de signalisation. Alstom se positionne comme un leader mondial des systèmes ferroviaires intégrés. En 2015/16, l'entreprise a réalisé un chiffre d'affaires de 6,9 milliards d'euros et enregistré pour 10,6 milliards d'euros de commandes. Alstom, dont le siège est basé en France, est présent dans plus de 60 pays et emploie actuellement 31 000 collaborateurs. Ses quelque 8 800 collaborateurs en France sont détenteurs d'un savoir-faire destiné à servir les clients français et internationaux. Un emploi chez Alstom en génère environ trois chez ses fournisseurs. www.alstom.com


News Article | November 25, 2015
Site: news.yahoo.com

The cooling tower of the nuclear power plant is pictured near the northern Swiss town Leibstadt May 1, 2014. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse (SWITZERLAND - Tags: ENERGY) More PARIS (Reuters) - Early this year, France's state energy and environment agency was set to publish a study that found the country could realistically abandon nuclear reactors and rely completely on renewable power in decades to come. But the presentation was scrapped under political pressure, with Energy Minister Segolene Royal later saying the agency needed to be "coherent" with government targets. The episode illustrated the tensions surrounding energy policy in a country steeped in nuclear power since the 1970s and which relies on it for three-quarters of its electricity - more than any other nation. Any suggestion of abandoning the atom is unthinkable for many in France, where scientists played a key role in discovering radioactivity, atomic energy is broadly accepted by all major political parties except the greens and the nuclear industry employs 220,000 people. Ahead of the U.N. climate change conference in Paris next week, the French position exposes the lack of any consistent European policy on how best to switch from polluting fossil fuels to cleaner energy and reduce carbon emissions. In Germany, the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster led to an exit from nuclear and a massive switch to renewables, while many other countries also decided to phase out nuclear. But French lawmakers in July voted only to cap nuclear capacity at current levels and to reduce its share in the power mix to 50 percent by 2025 - without announcing any concrete steps towards that goal. They also backed a government target for renewables to generate 40 percent of power by 2030. The study by state energy and environment agency ADEME - tasked with leading France's energy transition - had found, by contrast, that France could switch to 100 percent renewable energy for power generation by 2050 at a cost similar to sticking with atomic energy for 50 percent of its power. "We show that a hypothesis that most stakeholders thought was unthinkable, is actually technically possible," ADEME head Bruno Lechevin wrote. The report was finally published in October - months after lawmakers had approved the government's energy transition law - and included a carefully worded introduction by Lechevin, saying it was "an exploratory scientific study, not a political scenario". France's heavy reliance on nuclear power means it is, in some respects, a model for low-carbon power generation, but that also makes it harder to consider a shift to renewable energy. The nuclear industry argues world leaders at the COP21 conference in Paris next week should not have to choose between nuclear and renewables but between low-carbon energy - including nuclear - and fossil fuels. "We were surprised to see that the draft COP21 documents do not mention nuclear energy at all as a solution to climate change," said Isabelle Jouette of French nuclear lobby SFEN. But critics like Greenpeace say nuclear power - whose share of world electricity production has been stable at around 11 percent for years - cannot be part of any climate solutions put forward at the U.N. conference because of the risks related to reactor accidents and waste storage. They also say building reactors is too expensive and slow. "If we are going to spend a lot of money to tackle climate change, we have to do it in the most economically efficient way, which is renewables, not nuclear," said Greenpeace energy campaigner Cyrille Cormier. Cost and timing have been the banes of the French nuclear industry in recent years. As costs for solar and wind energy have dropped dramatically in the past decade, the cost of nuclear has climbed as safety requirements have tightened. EDF's Areva-designed EPR reactor in Flamanville - the sole nuclear reactor under construction in France - has seen its cost balloon from an initial budget of 3 billion euros ($3.2 billion) to 10.5 billion euros, while the two EPR reactors EDF plans to build in Britain's Hinkley Point are estimated to cost 12 billion euros apiece. Once the great hope for a French global nuclear export drive, Areva has seen its equity wiped out by years of losses and its reactor division has been taken over by EDF. EDF itself has seen its stock fall 37 percent since January and 83 percent from its 2007 highs as investors worry where it will find the billions to upgrade its ageing French reactors, build new ones and turn around the Areva reactor unit. This is why the ADEME's 100 percent renewables study could be an existential threat to the company, which has lagged other European utilities in deploying solar and wind. If France were to switch to 100 percent renewable energies to produce power by 2050 - 63 percent wind, 17 percent solar, 13 percent hydro and 7 percent other renewables - the average cost would be 119 euros per megawatt-hour, according to the study That is nearly the same as the average 117 euros per MWh for a scenario with 55 percent nuclear and 40 percent renewables. France's former monopoly power provider EDF - the world's biggest operator of nuclear reactors - could not disagree more with the idea of phasing out nuclear in France. Its management has repeatedly said that any reduction in the share of nuclear in France's energy mix will not come from closing down reactors but from increased demand from new uses for power like electric vehicles. Despite stagnant power demand in recent years and government policies to boost energy efficiency, EDF boss Jean-Bernard Levy said last month that France's nuclear capacity of 63.2 gigawatt may be a minimum, not a maximum, and spoke of building more than 30 new reactors to replace EDF's ageing nuclear fleet. Lechevin - a former leader with the moderate CFDT union who started his career as an EDF warehouse clerk - said it was not surprising EDF still operated within a logic of equating economic growth with higher energy use. "EDF is a big tanker, it takes time to change course," he said, adding that the firm might need a shove to become a driving force of France's energy transition. Lechevin said his agency was neither for or against nuclear, but warned that EDF's strength in nuclear should not blind it to the opportunities in renewable energy and energy efficiency. "France's strong suit is nuclear, but this can also be its weakness," he said.


News Article | November 25, 2015
Site: www.reuters.com

The cooling tower of the nuclear power plant is pictured near the northern Swiss town Leibstadt May 1, 2014. But the presentation was scrapped under political pressure, with Energy Minister Segolene Royal later saying the agency needed to be "coherent" with government targets. The episode illustrated the tensions surrounding energy policy in a country steeped in nuclear power since the 1970s and which relies on it for three-quarters of its electricity - more than any other nation. Any suggestion of abandoning the atom is unthinkable for many in France, where scientists played a key role in discovering radioactivity, atomic energy is broadly accepted by all major political parties except the greens and the nuclear industry employs 220,000 people. Ahead of the U.N. climate change conference in Paris next week, the French position exposes the lack of any consistent European policy on how best to switch from polluting fossil fuels to cleaner energy and reduce carbon emissions. In Germany, the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster led to an exit from nuclear and a massive switch to renewables, while many other countries also decided to phase out nuclear. But French lawmakers in July voted only to cap nuclear capacity at current levels and to reduce its share in the power mix to 50 percent by 2025 - without announcing any concrete steps towards that goal. They also backed a government target for renewables to generate 40 percent of power by 2030. The study by state energy and environment agency ADEME - tasked with leading France's energy transition - had found, by contrast, that France could switch to 100 percent renewable energy for power generation by 2050 at a cost similar to sticking with atomic energy for 50 percent of its power. "We show that a hypothesis that most stakeholders thought was unthinkable, is actually technically possible," ADEME head Bruno Lechevin wrote. The report was finally published in October - months after lawmakers had approved the government's energy transition law - and included a carefully worded introduction by Lechevin, saying it was "an exploratory scientific study, not a political scenario". France's heavy reliance on nuclear power means it is, in some respects, a model for low-carbon power generation, but that also makes it harder to consider a shift to renewable energy. The nuclear industry argues world leaders at the COP21 conference in Paris next week should not have to choose between nuclear and renewables but between low-carbon energy - including nuclear - and fossil fuels. "We were surprised to see that the draft COP21 documents do not mention nuclear energy at all as a solution to climate change," said Isabelle Jouette of French nuclear lobby SFEN. But critics like Greenpeace say nuclear power - whose share of world electricity production has been stable at around 11 percent for years - cannot be part of any climate solutions put forward at the U.N. conference because of the risks related to reactor accidents and waste storage. They also say building reactors is too expensive and slow. "If we are going to spend a lot of money to tackle climate change, we have to do it in the most economically efficient way, which is renewables, not nuclear," said Greenpeace energy campaigner Cyrille Cormier. Cost and timing have been the banes of the French nuclear industry in recent years. As costs for solar and wind energy have dropped dramatically in the past decade, the cost of nuclear has climbed as safety requirements have tightened. EDF's Areva-designed EPR reactor in Flamanville - the sole nuclear reactor under construction in France - has seen its cost balloon from an initial budget of 3 billion euros ($3.2 billion) to 10.5 billion euros, while the two EPR reactors EDF plans to build in Britain's Hinkley Point are estimated to cost 12 billion euros apiece. Once the great hope for a French global nuclear export drive, Areva has seen its equity wiped out by years of losses and its reactor division has been taken over by EDF. EDF itself has seen its stock fall 37 percent since January and 83 percent from its 2007 highs as investors worry where it will find the billions to upgrade its ageing French reactors, build new ones and turn around the Areva reactor unit. This is why the ADEME's 100 percent renewables study could be an existential threat to the company, which has lagged other European utilities in deploying solar and wind. If France were to switch to 100 percent renewable energies to produce power by 2050 - 63 percent wind, 17 percent solar, 13 percent hydro and 7 percent other renewables - the average cost would be 119 euros per megawatt-hour, according to the study That is nearly the same as the average 117 euros per MWh for a scenario with 55 percent nuclear and 40 percent renewables. France's former monopoly power provider EDF - the world's biggest operator of nuclear reactors - could not disagree more with the idea of phasing out nuclear in France. Its management has repeatedly said that any reduction in the share of nuclear in France's energy mix will not come from closing down reactors but from increased demand from new uses for power like electric vehicles. Despite stagnant power demand in recent years and government policies to boost energy efficiency, EDF boss Jean-Bernard Levy said last month that France's nuclear capacity of 63.2 gigawatt may be a minimum, not a maximum, and spoke of building more than 30 new reactors to replace EDF's ageing nuclear fleet. Lechevin - a former leader with the moderate CFDT union who started his career as an EDF warehouse clerk - said it was not surprising EDF still operated within a logic of equating economic growth with higher energy use. "EDF is a big tanker, it takes time to change course," he said, adding that the firm might need a shove to become a driving force of France's energy transition. Lechevin said his agency was neither for or against nuclear, but warned that EDF's strength in nuclear should not blind it to the opportunities in renewable energy and energy efficiency. "France's strong suit is nuclear, but this can also be its weakness," he said.


News Article | November 11, 2015
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« ORNL, industry partners using high-performance computing to develop new high-temperature aluminum alloys for engines | Main | Sandy solution for renewable energy storage; Thermal Energy Storage System » It’s fascinating how individuals and companies continue to find creative ways to recycle and reuse. Companies will attract negative attention for not doing their part to help protect the environment—potentially risking a loss in profits due to a shrinking consumer base because of their environmental decisions. One company, Michelin, has learned how to recycle and reuse large amounts of scrap tires in an intriguing way. Since the 1990s, there have been many efforts towards learning the best and most efficient ways of how to recycle scrap tires. These efforts include: tire-derived fuel; civil engineering; and asphalt rubber. According to the EPA, asphalt rubber is the largest single market for ground rubber, consuming an estimated 220 million pounds, or approximately 12 million tires. Michelin is leading a tire recycling project called TREC (Tire Recycling). Launched in 2014, TREC is backed by a €51-million budget extending over eight years. France’s Agency for the Environment and Energy Management (ADEME) will provide €13.3 million to Michelin and SDTech as part of the French government “Investing in the Future” program. The project has two parts: TREC Regeneration and TREC Alcohol. Michelin has paired up with two French companies to handle this project: SDTech (Solides Divisés Technologies) and Protéus. TREC Regeneration. SDTech and Protéus are a major part of the regeneration process, in which Michelin is using biotechnologies to create a micropowder that can be used as a raw material to produce new high-performance tires. Micropowder is transformed from end-of-life tires to create a lower cost, and more sustainable material that replaces oil and rubber-based materials. The goal of this process is to reduce costs and cut waste. According to Lehigh Technologies, products derived from end-of-life tire rubber have gone through extensive testing for health and safety in the United States and Europe by independent laboratories and government agencies. In all of these application tests, ground tire rubber (GTR) has been found to be safe. TREC Alcohol. Michelin currently uses a mixture of natural rubber and a synthetic compound called butadiene—currently mainly produced as a by-product of ethylene production from steam crackers—in the production of tires. As demand has risen, Michelin foresees a shortage of butadiene by 2020. To combat this possible shortage, Michelin has launched a program called “Bio Butterfly” in hopes of producing butadiene the future. TREC Alcohol will entail producing alcohol from raw materials (sugar, wood, straw, beets, agriculture waste) and end-of-life tires, which can then be catalytically converted to butadiene. Michelin’s innovation strategy consistently focuses on making the best possible use of raw materials. The TREC project is a perfect example of ecodesign, and it will help us make new high-performance tires using quality raw materials from used tires, thanks to the shared expertise of the CEA, Protéus and SDTech.


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

Press release  London, 21 November 2016     Marine Renewable Energy:   Tidal demonstrator to be built by HydroQuest and the CMN group     At the International Tidal Energy Summit, being held in London on November 22 and 23, HydroQuest and CMN (Constructions Mécaniques de Normandie) announce the launch of an innovative demonstration project for the tidal energy sector.   Implemented with support from the University of Caen Normandie, this project involves installing an ocean-based 1 MW hydrokinetic tidal turbine at the Paimpol-Bréhat site, as part of an agreement with EDF, from the second half of 2017.   The project was selected in France's call-for-projects, "Marine renewable energies and pilot river turbine farms", funded by the State in the context of its Investments in the Future Program and operated by ADEME.   The demonstrator's goal is to validate this machine's performance under real operating conditions, with plans for commercialisation on an international scale by 2019.   Pierre Balmer, CEO of CMN, explains: "The partnership surrounding the demonstrator is part of our growth strategy for marine renewable energies, a sector which will become one of the pillars for our company over time, in addition to our historical activity in naval construction. This project, which further solidifies the collaboration we have established with HydroQuest over the past several years, confirms the launch of a French tidal hydrokinetic turbine industry in which we are now present alongside HydroQuest."   Jean-François Simon, CEO of HydroQuest, says: "Being selected by ADEME demonstrates real recognition by the State of our HydroQuest hydrokinetic turbine technology, which has already proven its effectiveness in river scenarios. Following the validation of our demonstrator's operation, our goal will be to implement pilot farms with a few turbines in France and around the world. We will then move forward with the installation of commercial farms starting in 2019, thus participating in the energy transition that is already taking place."   Technology with high potential for energy and the environment   The HydroQuest Ocean turbine offers many benefits, including:   High performance: with unique technology featuring two vertical axes, free of any prominent central obstacles, the turbine offers efficient hydrodynamic output with nominal power of 1 MW. In addition, this cross-flow turbine is essentially unaffected by current direction, enabling the unit to be fixed to its foundation without any production loss.   Robust design: the all-metal structure improves resistance to water-related constraints while reducing the cost of maintenance operations.   Adjustable height: the machine will be developed with one or two levels to adapt to the various depths of worldwide water resources.   Cost-effectiveness: manufacturing and maintenance costs are reduced, offering one of the best price/MW ratios available for equipment today.   HydroQuest Ocean will be built at CMN workshops in Cherbourg, then ocean-tested under real operating conditions for several months.          


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

PARIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Regulatory News: Ecoslops (Paris:ALESA) (Code ISIN : FR0011490648 ; Mnémonique : ALESA / éligible PEA-PME), entreprise technologique innovante produisant du carburant et du bitume léger à partir de résidus pétroliers issus du transport maritime, annonce que son projet a été sélectionné parmi les lauréats de l’appel d’offre à projets Initiatives PME « Recyclage et valorisation des déchets » lancé par l’Etat et l’ADEME en mars 2016 dans le cadre de l’action « Démonstrateur


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

PARIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Regulatory News: Ecoslops (Paris:ALESA) (Code ISIN: FR0011490648; Ticker: ALESA / PEA-PME eligible), an innovative technology company that upgrades ship-generated hydrocarbon residues, or “slops” into new fuels and light bitumen, today announced that it has won a call for projects in the SME Initiative “Recycling and Recovery of Waste”. The initiative was launched in March 2016 by the Investment for the Future Program. The French Government and ADEME (the French Environm

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