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Lumding Railway Colony, India

Kamble V.A.,Adarsha Science
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2014

The antimicrobial property of volatile aromatic oils from medicinal as well as other edible plants has been recognized since antiquity. Candida species are an important cause of opportunistic infections in the oral cavity of immunocompromised patients and vaginal candidiasis. The antifungal activity of the essential oil of Cinnamomum cassia (cassia oil) was investigated against 75 clinical isolates of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida. Disc diffusion method was used to evaluate the sensitivity profile of clinical isolates to undiluted and diluted (3:1, 2:2 and (1:3) cassia oil. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFC) were evaluated by broth microdilution and broth macrodilution method. Cassia essential oil strongly inhibited all clinical isolates of C. albicans and non-albicans Candida with growth inhibition zones ranging from 40 to 72 mm. Cassia oil inhibited C. albicans growth with mean minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.10 μl/ml (v/v) and 0.07 μl/ml (v/v) by broth micro dilution and broth macrodilution method, respectively. The clinical isolates of C. albicans required as high as 0.15 μl/ml (v/v) concentration of cassia oil for its inhibition by both methods. The isolates of nonalbicans Candida showed MIC range of 0.02-0.62 μl/ml (v/v) by broth microdilution and broth macrodilution method. Source


Patil Sahadeo D.,Shri Shivaji Science College | Kamble Vilas A.,Adarsha Science
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2011

Essential oils are well known in traditional medicine as antiseptic and antimicrobial agents. This study determined the antimicrobial effects of eleven spice essential oils using a disc diffusion method against four Gram-positive and eight Gramnegative bacteria of spoilage and health significance. Cassia oil showed the largest zones of inhibition (12 to 54 mm) and the widest antibacterial spectrum, followed by essential oil of allspice, clove and nutmeg. Essential oils of mace, celery, ginger, cardamom, black pepper, fennel and turmeric were the least effective spice oils. Grampositive bacteria were shown to be more sensitive to the spice essential oils than Gramnegative bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis were the most sensitive bacterial strains tested; where as a strain of Escherichia coli (MTCC-118) was the least sensitive. These results showed that spice essential oils may prove useful in inhibiting bacteria of food spoilage and health significance. Source


Thosar M.G.,Adarsha Science | Kamble V.A.,Adarsha Science
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2014

Klebsiella is a very frequent isolate in hospital environment and different Klebsiella species may vary with the type of infection they cause. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of different Klebsiella species in clinical samples collected from Amravati and Akola districts of Vidarbha region. A total of 1081 clinical samples were collected from different hospitals of Amravati and Akola district and Private pathology laboratories. The clinical samples viz; oral thrush, blood, urine, sputum, burn wound swab, cerebrospinal fluid and some miscellaneous samples were collected and cultured on MacConkey agar, Blood agar, UTI agar and MacConkey agar modified. A total of 437 (40.42%) clinical isolates of Klebsiella were isolated and identified at species level using various biochemical tests. Three different Klebsiella species were recovered among them, K. pneumoniae (385) was the commonest followed by K. oxytoca (51), while K. ozanae had only one isolate. Among different clinical samples, burn wound swabs (60.70%) showed highest prevalence of Klebsiella followed by sputum (45%), urine (42.86%), blood (34.40%), tracheal secretion (27.27%), oral thrush (32.4%), miscellaneous samples (20%) and CSF (2%). This study has provided the base line for generating data on the prevalence of different Klebsiella species in various clinical samples collected from Amravati and Akola district of Vidarbha region. Source


Somkuwar D.O.,Adarsha Science | Kamble V.A.,Adarsha Science
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2013

Mangifera indica L. is medicinally important plant species used to treat different diseases. The present work is aimed to screen this medicinal plant for phytochemicals. Leaf, stem, flower and seed kernel powder of this plant were extracted in ethanol solvents by soxhlet extraction and screened for secondary metabolites. Leaves of Mangifera indica revealed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, phytosterols, tannins, fixed oils and fats, resins, phenols, flavonoids, proteins; and absence of glycosides and amino acids. Stem of Mangifera indica showed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, phytosterols, resins, phenols, tannins, flavonoids, proteins; and absence of glycosides, tannins and amino acids. Whereas the flower and seed kernel revealed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, saponins, phytosterols, fixed oils and fats, resins, phenols, tannins, flavonoids, proteins and amino acids but absence of anthranol glycosides. The plant parts showed variation in secondary metabolites. Mangifera indica accumulates more number of secondary metabolites. The findings of the present study will be helpful to the phytochemists and pharmacologists for identification of new active principles. Source

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