Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center

Ziway, Ethiopia

Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center

Ziway, Ethiopia
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Nemera F.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Tessema Z.K.,Haramaya University | Ebro A.,International Livestock Research Institute ILRI
Livestock Research for Rural Development | Year: 2017

An experiment was conducted to evaluate the forage yield and quality of the natural pasture in degraded grassland through the application of chemical fertilizer, cattle manure, wood ash and lime at Meta Robi district of west Shoa zone in the central highland of Ethiopia, from June to October 2015, The study was carried in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three replications.Application of organic fertilizers such as cattle manure and wood ash increased the botanical composition of herbaceous legumes over grasses; whereas, chemical fertilizer application increased the botanical composition of grasses and total DM yield production of the grassland. Cattle manure application increased crude protein and IVDMD contents of the grasslands as opposed to chemical fertilizer application.Accordingly, for immediate soil fertility improvement of the existing grasslands, application of inorganic fertilizer is important. However, for sustainable improvement of the grasslands in the long-term, application of organic fertilizer, such cattle manure and wood ash are economical way of degraded grazing land improvement. Moreover, we recommend further studies on animal performance and feed intake to develop grassland-based feed resources for smallholder livestock producers in the highlands of Ethiopia. © 2017, Fundacion CIPAV. All rights reserved.


Nomura K.,Tokyo University of Agriculture | Ishii K.,Tokyo University of Agriculture | Dadi H.,Tokyo University of Agriculture | Dadi H.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | And 7 more authors.
Animal Genetics | Year: 2012

The genetic differentiation and phylogenetic relationships of 18 indigenous goat populations from seven East Asian countries were analysed based on data obtained from 26 microsatellite DNA markers. The mean number of alleles (MNA) per population ranged from 2.5 to 7.6, with an average of 5.8. Genetic variability estimated from MNA and heterozygosity (HE and H O) were relatively low in coastal and island populations. A heterozygous deficiency within populations (FIS = 0.054, P < 0.001) and total inbreeding (FIT = 0.181, P < 0.01) were observed, and genetic differentiation in the populations (FST) was 13.4%. The results of Bayesian model-based clustering and a neighbour-joining tree based on Nei's genetic distance showed that Asian goat populations could be subdivided into at least the following three genetic clusters: East Asian, Southeast Asian and Mongolian. These results are in close accordance with conventional morphological and geographical classifications and migration history. © 2012 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2012 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.


Kebede T.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Haile A.,International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas | Dadi H.,Chungbuk National University
Tropical Animal Health and Production | Year: 2012

The study was conducted in the central rift valley of Ethiopia to define Arsi-Bale goat keepers' breeding objectives and breeding practices and to describe flock management practices and rate of inbreeding in Arsi-Bale goat population. Two-stage sampling techniques were employed to select study sites and 202 respondents. Semistructured questionnaire and group discussion were used to collect the required information. Data were analyzed using statistical package for social science. Rate of inbreeding in the population and indices were also calculated. On average, each respondent holds around 12 goats in which 30.7, 66.6 and 2.7% were males, females and castrates, respectively. The most important purpose of goat production in the study area was for milk utilization. Farmers have multiple breeding objectives and they considered both subjective and objective selection criteria with slightly more emphasis on morphological characteristics for buck selection than replacement doe selection. Only 39.1% (n = 79) of respondents have their own breeding bucks. None of the respondents practiced controlled mating. Average rate of inbreeding in the population was around 0.20. Arsi-Bale goats are found to be adaptive to the prevailing condition. Therefore, any breed improvement strategy to be designed or implemented in the study area and other similar areas should consider important traditional breeding practices. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Kebede T.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Haile A.,International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas | Dadi H.,Chungbuk National University | Alemu T.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center
Tropical Animal Health and Production | Year: 2012

The study was conducted to evaluate reproductive performances and estimate genetic parameters for reproduction traits in Arsi-Bale goats. A total of 792 kidding records collected from 2001 to 2007 were used. Parity of dam, year, season and type of kidding were investigated as fixed effects by PROC GLM of SAS. Derivative-Free Restricted Maximum Likelihood (DFREML) method was used to estimate genetic parameters by fitting four animal models. Parity of dam and year of kidding influenced (P < 0.05) all the traits. The overall means for age at first kidding (AFK), kidding interval (KI), litter size at birth (LSB), litter size at weaning (LSW), litter weight at birth (LWB), litter weight at weaning (LWW), abortion and dystocia were 574.9 ± 8.3 days, 280.0 ± 13.7 days, 1.6 ± 0.03, 1.37 ± 0.03, 3.7 ± 0.08 kg, 9.11 ± 0.38 kg, 3.8% and 0.13%, respectively. The estimates of direct additive heritability for the traits, except for abortion and dystocia, under the best model (direct animal for AFK and repeatability model for other traits) were 0.245 ± 0.19, 0.060 ± 0.08, 0.074 ± 0.05, 0.006 ± 0.05, 0.125 ± 0.05, 0.053 ± 0.07, respectively, while the corresponding permanent environmental effects were 0.00 ± 0.00, 0.07 ± 0.07, 0.08 ± 0.05, 0.172 ± 0.06, 0.03 ± 0.04 and 0.07 ± 0.05, respectively. Repeatability estimates for KI, LSB, LSW, LWB and LWW were 0.13, 0.15, 0.18, 0.16 and 0.12, respectively. Genetic correlations between reproductive traits vary from medium to high. Arsi-Bale goats have good reproductive performance with low incidence of reproductive disorder. Except for AFK, other traits have low estimates of heritabilities with high genetic correlation among the traits. Repeated measures of the traits are needed before deciding to keep or cull the animal. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Umeta G.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Duguma M.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Hundesa F.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Muleta M.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center
African Journal of Agricultural Research | Year: 2011

The study was conducted at selected districts of East Showa zone namely; Adami Tulu Jido Kombolcha and Fentale districts with an objective of identifying problems limiting goat production at the area, to identify constraints and opportunities of goat production of the area and generating information for development practitioners working in the area. The sampled district was selected based on the potential of goat production of the zone. Two kebele per district were selected. 15 to 20 key informant farmers were identified with development workers per sampled kebele for group discussion. Both female and male households invited for group discussion. Appropriate Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) tools were identified and used for the study. A mix of PRA tools like group discussion, key informant interviews, pair wise ranking and seasonal calendar were employed for data collection and analysis. The PRA result was analyzed by descriptive statistics by using PRA tools. The study result indicates that, goat production is one of the major livelihood activities for the goat keepers of the area. In addition, it is used as household consumption (milk, butter and meat), generating income serves as wealth storage, and social values/ social gathering. Different problems like diseases (sheep and goat pox, diarrhea, ecto-parasite, circling disease and Mastitis, CCPP, anthrax, pasteurellosis, FMD), shortage of feeds, and lack of awareness on small ruminant fattening extension packages like concentrate supplementation and housing managements, market related problems, lack of awareness on inbreeding concepts and its effect, long kidding interval and Cu- deficiency are the major problems identified by the current study, which limits goat production in the area. Based on this finding, the study recommends that creating of wider awareness for farmers on goat production packages majorly, fattening extension packages, strengthening of veterinary services, reducing of inbreeding through awareness creation and/or introduction of cross breeds are some of the areas that needs to be improved. The study further recommends that, improving of animal feeds is the other major focus areas that needs to be giving due attention by stakeholders working in the area. © 2011 Academic Journals.


Awas G.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Abdisa T.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Tolosa K.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Chali A.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center
African Journal of Agricultural Research | Year: 2011

The effect of inter- row spacing with double row arrangement on yield and yield components of tomato (Lycopersicon esculuntum Mill.) was conducted at Adami Tulu agricultural research center, Ethiopia, during the season of 2007 and 2008 using irrigation. The experiment was conducted to determine the optimum inter-row spacing for tomato production with double row arrangement, using randomized complete block design (RCBD) with 4 replications. Area occupied by a single plot was 4 m × 3 m with spacing of 1.5 m x 1 m between block and plot, respectively. There were a total of 5 treatments (interrow spacing). The analyzed result at α = 0.05 indicated that,there was no significance difference among treatments (100 × 30, 60 × 30, 50 × 30, 40 × 30 and 30 × 30 cm) between row and plant, respectively for marketable yield. Even though marketable yield showed no significance difference, 40 × 30 cm gave higher marketable yield (607.9 q/ha) followed by 60 × 30 cm and 50 × 30 cm (570.4 q/ha and 568 q/ha, respectively). From the treatments 100 × 30 cm inter -row spacing showed the least marketable yield (475.85 q/ha) as compared with the rest 4 treatments. © 2010 Academic Journals.


Chalchissa G.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Mekasha Y.,International Livestock Research Institute | Urge M.,Haramaya University
Tropical and Subtropical Agroecosystems | Year: 2014

The study was conducted in urban and peri-urban areas of Southern Ethiopia to assess the quality of available feed resources and feeding practices in the area. Shashamane city was considered as urban, while Kerara Filicha, Kuyera and Arsi Negele were considered as peri-urban production system. Structured questionnaire, secondary data sources and field observations were employed to generate data. A total of 60 dairy farmers from urban and 60 from peri-urban (Kerara Filicha =20, Kuyera = 20 and Arsi Negele = 20) were selected for the study. Average herd size per farm in urban area was 5.08plusmn;0.35 out of which small and medium scale farms had 2.6plusmn;0.2 and 7.5plusmn;0.29 crossbred cattle, respectively. In peri-urban areas average herd size per farm was 4.7plusmn;0.34 crossbred cattle out of which 2.3plusmn;0.16 were in small and 7.06plusmn;0.24 in medium scale farms. Fifteen major feed types used by dairy farms were identified in the area and categorized into five classes: grazing, green feeds, crop residues, agro-industrial by-products and non-conventional feeds. The result of the study indicated that wheat straw and teff straw were the main basal diets in the study area. Laboratory analysis of major feed resources indicated that crop residues had CP, digestibility and metabolizable energy contents of 2.9-5.9%, 46.6% and 5.9-8.7MJ/kg DM, respectively. About 50% of small and 51.7% of medium scale farms use roughage feeds as a major feed source. Therefore, from the current study it was concluded that the quality of available basal roughage feed is generally low and needs strategic supplementation with protein and energy rich feeds.


Dinka H.,Adama University | Chala R.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Dawo F.,Addis Ababa Institute of Technology | Leta S.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center | Bekana E.,Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center
Livestock Research for Rural Development | Year: 2010

Village chickens are found in different agro-ecologies of Ethiopia but clear information is lacking regarding their socio-economic importance and production management in rift valley of Oromia, Ethiopia. Therefore, in this study a total of 88 households rearing village chickens in rift valley of Oromia, were surveyed to get base line information on characteristics of households involved in village chicken production and utilization, feeding, reproductive and housing management of village chicken. The majority (92.4%) of the surveyed households said that village chicken production is accomplished by women and children. It was also shown that village chicken keepers in the study areas used chickens and their by products for home expenditure (44%), home consumption (24%), ceremony and/or sacrifice (22%) and as deposit (10%). Fifty percent of the respondents said the age at first egg is 24 to 28 weeks. The overall average flock size was 13 chickens per household (i.e., 12 local chickens and one exotic chicken per household). Even though, no village chicken producers formulate poultry feed in all the study areas 60% of them cultivate by themselves locally where in 90% of the cases maize, wheat, sorghum and household waste products are used as the main source of village chicken feed. Chickens were kept in cartoons and baskets made of bamboo or a round stick placed in the main house (58%) and perch (26.6%). In the present study, 81% of the households cleaned chickens houses once per day, and 14% twice per day. The survey also further showed that village chicken keepers in the study areas usually stimulated broody hens to lay eggs by changing their houses (30%), hanging their leg up down to fixed objects (21%) and providing additional feed (13%). Since village chickens play an important role in improving the livelihood of the families, there is a need to design and implement a research programme in order to improve their productivity in rift valley of Oromia, Ethiopia.


PubMed | Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Tropical animal health and production | Year: 2012

The study was conducted in the central rift valley of Ethiopia to define Arsi-Bale goat keepers breeding objectives and breeding practices and to describe flock management practices and rate of inbreeding in Arsi-Bale goat population. Two-stage sampling techniques were employed to select study sites and 202 respondents. Semistructured questionnaire and group discussion were used to collect the required information. Data were analyzed using statistical package for social science. Rate of inbreeding in the population and indices were also calculated. On average, each respondent holds around 12 goats in which 30.7, 66.6 and 2.7% were males, females and castrates, respectively. The most important purpose of goat production in the study area was for milk utilization. Farmers have multiple breeding objectives and they considered both subjective and objective selection criteria with slightly more emphasis on morphological characteristics for buck selection than replacement doe selection. Only 39.1% (n = 79) of respondents have their own breeding bucks. None of the respondents practiced controlled mating. Average rate of inbreeding in the population was around 0.20. Arsi-Bale goats are found to be adaptive to the prevailing condition. Therefore, any breed improvement strategy to be designed or implemented in the study area and other similar areas should consider important traditional breeding practices.


PubMed | Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Tropical animal health and production | Year: 2012

The study was conducted to evaluate reproductive performances and estimate genetic parameters for reproduction traits in Arsi-Bale goats. A total of 792 kidding records collected from 2001 to 2007 were used. Parity of dam, year, season and type of kidding were investigated as fixed effects by PROC GLM of SAS. Derivative-Free Restricted Maximum Likelihood (DFREML) method was used to estimate genetic parameters by fitting four animal models. Parity of dam and year of kidding influenced (P < 0.05) all the traits. The overall means for age at first kidding (AFK), kidding interval (KI), litter size at birth (LSB), litter size at weaning (LSW), litter weight at birth (LWB), litter weight at weaning (LWW), abortion and dystocia were 574.9 8.3 days, 280.0 13.7 days, 1.6 0.03, 1.37 0.03, 3.7 0.08 kg, 9.11 0.38 kg, 3.8% and 0.13%, respectively. The estimates of direct additive heritability for the traits, except for abortion and dystocia, under the best model (direct animal for AFK and repeatability model for other traits) were 0.245 0.19, 0.060 0.08, 0.074 0.05, 0.006 0.05, 0.125 0.05, 0.053 0.07, respectively, while the corresponding permanent environmental effects were 0.00 0.00, 0.07 0.07, 0.08 0.05, 0.172 0.06, 0.03 0.04 and 0.07 0.05, respectively. Repeatability estimates for KI, LSB, LSW, LWB and LWW were 0.13, 0.15, 0.18, 0.16 and 0.12, respectively. Genetic correlations between reproductive traits vary from medium to high. Arsi-Bale goats have good reproductive performance with low incidence of reproductive disorder. Except for AFK, other traits have low estimates of heritabilities with high genetic correlation among the traits. Repeated measures of the traits are needed before deciding to keep or cull the animal.

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