ACL Laboratories

Rosemont, IL, United States

ACL Laboratories

Rosemont, IL, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Beganovic M.,Advocate Lutheran General Hospital | Beganovic M.,Rhode Island Infectious Diseases Research Program | Costello M.,ACL Laboratories | Wieczorkiewicz S.M.,Advocate Lutheran General Hospital
Journal of Clinical Microbiology | Year: 2017

Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization - time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) decreases the time to organism identification and improves clinical and financial outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of MALDI-TOF MS alone versus MALDI-TOF MS combined with real-time, pharmacist-driven, antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) intervention on patient outcomes. This single-center, pre-post, quasiexperimental study evaluated hospitalized patients with positive blood cultures identified via MALDI-TOF MS combined with prospective AMS intervention compared to a control cohort with MALDI-TOF MS identification without AMS intervention. AMS intervention included: real-time MALDITOF MS pharmacist notification and prospective AMS provider feedback. The primary outcome was the time to optimal therapy (TTOT). A total of 252 blood cultures, 126 in each group, were included in the final analysis. MALDI-TOF MS plus AMS intervention significantly reduced the overall TTOT (75.17 versus 43.06 h; P < 0.001), the Gram-positive contaminant TTOT (48.21 versus 11.75 h; P < 0.001), the Gramnegative infection (GNI) TTOT (71.83 versus 35.98 h; P < 0.001), and the overall hospital length of stay (LOS; 15.03 versus 9.02 days; P = 0.021). The TTOT for Grampositive infection (GPI) was improved (64.04 versus 41.61 h; P = 0.082). For GPI, the hospital LOS (14.64 versus 10.31 days; P = 0.002) and length of antimicrobial therapy 24.30 versus 18.97 days; P = 0.018) were reduced. For GNI, the time to microbiologic clearance (51.13 versus 34.51 h; P < 0.001), the hospital LOS (15.40 versus 7.90 days; P = 0.027), and the intensive care unit LOS (5.55 versus 1.19 days; P = 0.035) were reduced. To achieve optimal outcomes, rapid identification with MALDITOF MS combined with real-time AMS intervention is more impactful than MALDITOF MS alone. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Caliendo A.M.,Emory University | Valsamakis A.,Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions | Bremer J.W.,Rush University | Ferreira-Gonzalez A.,Virginia Commonwealth University | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Microbiology | Year: 2011

The performance characteristics of four different assays for hepatitis B virus (HBV) quantification were assessed: the Abbott RealTime HBV IUO, the Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HBV test, the Roche Cobas TaqMan HBV test with HighPure system, and the Qiagen artus HBV TM ASR. Limit of detection (LOD), linear range, reproducibility, and agreement were determined using a serially diluted plasma sample from a single chronically infected subject. Each assay was tested by at least three laboratories. The LOD of the RealTime and two TaqMan assays was approximately 1.0 log 10 IU/ml; for artus HBV (which used the lowest volume of extracted DNA), it was approximately 1.5 log 10 IU/ml. The linear range spanned 1.0 to at least 7.0 log 10 IU/ml for all assays. Median values were consistently lowest for artus HBV and highest for Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HBV. Assays incorporating automated nucleic acid extraction were the most reproducible; however, the overall variability was minor since the standard deviations for the means of all tested concentrations were ≤0.32 log 10 IU/ml for all assays. False-positive results were observed with all assays; the highest rates occurred with tests using manual nucleic acid extraction. The performance characteristics of these assays suggest that they are useful for management and therapeutic monitoring of chronic HBV infection. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Aldinger K.A.,University of Chicago | Aldinger K.A.,University of Southern California | Kogan J.,Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center | Kogan J.,ACL Laboratories | And 10 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2013

The 22q13.3 deletion causes a neurodevelopmental syndrome, also known as Phelan-McDermid syndrome (MIM #606232), characterized by developmental delay and severe delay or absence of expressive speech. Two patients with hemizygous chromosome 22q13.3 telomeric deletion were referred to us when brain-imaging studies revealed cerebellar vermis hypoplasia (CBVH). To determine whether developmental abnormalities of the cerebellum are a consistent feature of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome, we examined brain-imaging studies for 10 unrelated subjects with 22q13 terminal deletion. In seven cases where the availability of DNA and array technology allowed, we mapped deletion boundaries using comparative intensity analysis with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays. Approximate deletion boundaries for three additional cases were derived from clinical or published molecular data. We also examined brain-imaging studies for a patient with an intragenic SHANK3 mutation. We report the first brain-imaging data showing that some patients with 22q13 deletions have severe posterior CBVH, and one individual with a SHANK3 mutation has a normal cerebellum. This genotype-phenotype study suggests that the 22q13 deletion phenotype includes abnormal posterior fossa structures that are unlikely to be attributed to SHANK3 disruption. Other genes in the region, including PLXNB2 and MAPK8IP2, display brain expression patterns and mouse mutant phenotypes critical for proper cerebellar development. Future studies of these genes may elucidate their relationship to 22q13.3 deletion phenotypes. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Balay L.,Northwestern University | Totten E.,Advocate Medical Group Genetics | Okada L.,St Alexius Medical Center | Zell S.,Advocate Childrens Hospital | And 4 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2016

Interstitial deletions of 11p13 involving MPPED2, DCDC5, DCDC1, DNAJC24, IMMP1L, and ELP4 are previously reported to have downstream transcriptional effects on the expression of PAX6, due to a downstream regulatory region (DRR). Currently, no clear genotype-phenotype correlations have been established allowing for conclusive information regarding the exact location of the PAX6 DRR, though its location has been approximated in mouse models to be within the Elp4 gene. Of the clinical reports currently published examining patients with intact PAX6 genes but harboring deletions identified in genes downstream of PAX6, 100% indicate phenotypes which include aniridia, whereas approximately half report additional eye deformities, autism, or intellectual disability. In this clinical report, we present a 12-year-old male patient, his brother, and mother with pericentric inversions of chromosome 11 associated with submicroscopic interstitial deletions of 11p13 and duplications of 11q22.3. The inversions were identified by standard cytogenetic analysis; microarray and FISH detected the chromosomal imbalance. The patient's phenotype includes intellectual disability, speech abnormalities, and autistic behaviors, but interestingly neither the patient, his brother, nor mother have aniridia or other eye anomalies. To the best of our knowledge, these findings in three family members represent the only reported cases with 11p13 deletions downstream of PAX6 not demonstrating phenotypic characteristics of aniridia or abnormal eye development. Although none of the deleted genes are obvious candidates for the patient's phenotype, the absence of aniridia in the presence of this deletion in all three family members further delineates the location of the DRR for PAX6. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Peirano G.,University of Calgary | Van Der Bij A.K.,Center for Infectious Disease Control | Van Der Bij A.K.,Reinier Of Graaf Hospital | Freeman J.L.,Auckland District Health Board | And 6 more authors.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2014

We designed a study to describe the characteristics of sequence type 131 (ST131) lineages, including the H30-Rx sublineage, among a global collection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolates from 9 countries collected from 2000 to 2011. A total of 240 nonrepeat isolates from Canada, the United States, Brazil, the Netherlands, France, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), India, South Africa, and New Zealand were included. Established PCR, sequencing, and typing methods were used to define ST131 lineages, H30 and H30-Rx phylogenetic groups, gyrA and parC mutations, virotypes, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants. The majority of the isolates produced CTX-M-15 with aac(6′)-lb-cr, belonged to phylogenetic group B2, and were positive for the H30 lineage with the gyrA1AB and parC1aAB mutations. ST131 showed 15 distinct pulsotypes; 43% of the isolates belonged to four pulsotypes, with a global distribution. Seventy-five percent of the ST131 isolates belonged to H30-Rx; this sublineage was present in all the countries and was associated with multidrug resistance, blaCTX-M-15, aac(6′)-lb-cr, and virotypes A and C. The H41 lineage was negative for the ST131 pabB allele-specific PCR. The multidrug-resistant H30-Rx sublineage poses an important public health threat due to its global distribution, association with virotype C, and high prevalence among ST131 isolates that produce CTX-M-15. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Peirano G.,Calgary Laboratory Services | Peirano G.,University of Calgary | Costello M.,ACL Laboratories | Pitout J.D.D.,Calgary Laboratory Services | Pitout J.D.D.,University of Calgary
International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents | Year: 2010

This study was designed to characterise 30 non-duplicate extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli clinical isolates from the community in the Chicago metropolitan area collected during 2008. The majority of isolates (n=28) were recovered from urine and 2 isolates were from blood. Molecular characterisation was done using the following techniques: isoelectric focusing; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of blaESBL; PCR for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants; identification of ST131; phylogenetic grouping; and replicon typing. Genetic relatedness was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with XbaI and repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) typing. Twenty-six (87%) of the ESBL-producing E. coli were positive for blaCTX-M genes (22 CTX-M-15 and 4 CTX-M-14), whilst the remaining 4 isolates produced SHV-2. Twenty-eight isolates (93%) were non-susceptible to ciprofloxacin and 16 (53%) were positive for aac(6')-Ib-cr. Overall, 16 (53%) of the ESBL-producers belonged to clonal complex ST131 that produced CTX-M-15 or CTX-M-14. Molecular characteristics of ST131 showed that it belonged to three distinct but related PFGE clones, was derived from phylogenetic group B2 and contained IncFII type plasmids. These results illustrate that E. coli clonal complex ST131 producing CTX-M-15, CTX-M-14, OXA-1, TEM-1 and aac(6')-Ib-cr has emerged as an important cause of community-onset urinary tract infections caused by ESBL-producing E. coli isolates in the Chicago area. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy.


Williams J.E.,ACL Laboratories | Walters J.,ACL Laboratories | Kabb K.,ACL Laboratories
Laboratory Medicine | Year: 2011

Objective: To investigate the performance of the body fluid application on the Sysmex XE-5000. Methods: The XE-5000 accuracy, precision, and analytic measurement range, as well as correlation with standard methods were evaluated using serous, synovial, and cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs). Results: The body fluid application on the XE-5000 showed good precision and correlation with previous methods for nucleated cell counts and RBC counts. Conclusion: Evaluation of the body fluid application on the Sysmex XE-5000 showed significant improvement in the ability of automated hematology analyzers regarding body fluid analysis. © 2011 by The American Society for Clinical Pathology.


Rabs N.,Advocate Lutheran General Hospital | Wieczorkiewicz S.M.,Advocate Lutheran General Hospital | Costello M.,ACL Laboratories | Zamfirova I.,Advocate Lutheran General Hospital
American Journal of Infection Control | Year: 2014

Background Traditional antibiograms guide clinicians in selecting appropriate empiric antimicrobials, but they lack data on syndrome/disease- specific susceptibility, isolate location, polymicrobial infections, and patient risk factors. The aim of this study was to develop a urinary-specific antibiogram and to evaluate the impact of risk factors on antimicrobial susceptibility. Methods This retrospective descriptive study used culture and susceptibility data from January 1 to December 31, 2012. A urinary antibiogram specific for Escherichia coli (EC), Proteus mirabilis (PM), Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) was developed. Urinary and standard antibiogram susceptibilities were compared. Urinary isolates were then stratified by risk factors - residence before admission, age, systemic antimicrobial use for ≤30 days, hospitalization for ≤ 30 days, and hospital unit - to determine the impact on antimicrobial susceptibility. Results There were 2,284 urinary isolate encounters. Overall antimicrobial susceptibility was increased, and the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing isolates was significantly greater (KP, 14% vs 7% [P =.001]; EC, 13% vs 9% [P <.001]; PM, 18% vs 10% [P =.004]) in the urinary antibiogram vs the standard antibiogram. Health care facility residence had the greatest impact on susceptibility for all urinary isolates, especially on fluoroquinolone susceptibility for EC and PM. Conclusions Using a syndromic antibiogram and incorporating patient risk factors into susceptibility data may be more useful in guiding clinicians in selecting more appropriate empiric therapy. © 2014 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Advocate Lutheran General Hospital and ACL Laboratories
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of infection control | Year: 2014

Traditional antibiograms guide clinicians in selecting appropriate empiric antimicrobials, but they lack data on syndrome/disease-specific susceptibility, isolate location, polymicrobial infections, and patient risk factors. The aim of this study was to develop a urinary-specific antibiogram and to evaluate the impact of risk factors on antimicrobial susceptibility.This retrospective descriptive study used culture and susceptibility data from January 1 to December 31, 2012. A urinary antibiogram specific for Escherichia coli (EC), Proteus mirabilis (PM), Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) was developed. Urinary and standard antibiogram susceptibilities were compared. Urinary isolates were then stratified by risk factors-residence before admission, age, systemic antimicrobial use for 30 days, hospitalization for 30 days, and hospital unit-to determine the impact on antimicrobial susceptibility.There were 2,284 urinary isolate encounters. Overall antimicrobial susceptibility was increased, and the prevalence of extended-spectrum -lactamase-producing isolates was significantly greater (KP, 14% vs 7% [P = .001]; EC, 13% vs 9% [P < .001]; PM, 18% vs 10% [P = .004]) in the urinary antibiogram vs the standard antibiogram. Health care facility residence had the greatest impact on susceptibility for all urinary isolates, especially on fluoroquinolone susceptibility for EC and PM.Using a syndromic antibiogram and incorporating patient risk factors into susceptibility data may be more useful in guiding clinicians in selecting more appropriate empiric therapy.


PubMed | University of Calgary, The Netherlands Reinier Of Graaf Hospital, University of Washington, University of Fribourg and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy | Year: 2014

We designed a study to describe the characteristics of sequence type 131 (ST131) lineages, including the H30-Rx sublineage, among a global collection of extended-spectrum -lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolates from 9 countries collected from 2000 to 2011. A total of 240 nonrepeat isolates from Canada, the United States, Brazil, the Netherlands, France, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), India, South Africa, and New Zealand were included. Established PCR, sequencing, and typing methods were used to define ST131 lineages, H30 and H30-Rx phylogenetic groups, gyrA and parC mutations, virotypes, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants. The majority of the isolates produced CTX-M-15 with aac(6)-lb-cr, belonged to phylogenetic group B2, and were positive for the H30 lineage with the gyrA1AB and parC1aAB mutations. ST131 showed 15 distinct pulsotypes; 43% of the isolates belonged to four pulsotypes, with a global distribution. Seventy-five percent of the ST131 isolates belonged to H30-Rx; this sublineage was present in all the countries and was associated with multidrug resistance, blaCTX-M-15, aac(6)-lb-cr, and virotypes A and C. The H41 lineage was negative for the ST131 pabB allele-specific PCR. The multidrug-resistant H30-Rx sublineage poses an important public health threat due to its global distribution, association with virotype C, and high prevalence among ST131 isolates that produce CTX-M-15.

Loading ACL Laboratories collaborators
Loading ACL Laboratories collaborators