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News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

— Even though at least 20,000 more qualified technicians are already needed to satisfy nationwide demand for HVAC services, according to ACHR News, the gap is still growing. Solving this significant problem will require more than the same old approaches. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, merely 1.7 percent of all American HVAC workers today are women, with only a small share of all HVAC businesses being owned by women, as well. Fortunately, those figures have started trending upward, thanks in part to initiatives like Bryant's annual Women in HVAC conference. As South Carolina's most service-oriented HVAC company since its 2001 founding, Cool Care Heating and Air was a proud participant in Bryant's just-concluded 2017 Women in HVAC event. With over 200 of the nation's top women HVAC professionals gathered to share insights, network, engage in training, and support one another, the conference was another successful step toward addressing a nationwide shortage of qualified HVAC workers and leaders. "Living and doing business in South Carolina can certainly make the value of reliable HVAC clear," said Cool Care Heating and Air co-founder and co-owner Teresa Wardlaw. "With so much demand for top-quality HVAC service, we're proud to be the top choice for so many clients throughout the Midlands. It was also truly special to participate in the recent Bryant Women in HVAC conference. As more women like our own Tia Savage continue to join the industry, we're all bound to benefit, and this event was another clear step in the right direction." With the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicting that demand for HVAC technicians will have grown by twice the overall ten-year average come 2024, a longtime shortage of qualified workers has started to seem like an even more significant issue. One especially notable bright spot highlighted in a number of recent reports, as with a FIELDBOSS feature from last October, is that women are increasingly joining the traditionally male-dominated HVAC field. With HVAC equipment companies and others seeking to encourage this productive development with scholarships, conferences, and other initiatives, momentum is building as women working in the industry help change longstanding perceptions. By participating in the recently concluded Bryant Women in HVAC conference, Cool Care Heating and Air helped support this important, highly positive trend. As reviews on the company's website at coolcarehvac.com make clear, Cool Care Heating and Air consistently delivers exceptional heating, cooling, and ventilation service of all kinds throughout the South Carolina Midlands. Those interested can learn more and schedule an appointment at https://coolcarehvac.com. About Cool Care Heating and Air: Offering a full range of top-quality HVAC services throughout the South Carolina Midlands, Cool Care Heating and Air employs NATE-certified technicians and is a Bryant factory authorized dealer. For more information, please visit https://coolcarehvac.com/


Global Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor market competition by top manufacturers, with production, price, revenue (value) and market share for each manufacturer; the top players including NGK Bosch DENSO Delphi Kefico UAES VOLKSE Pucheng Sensors Airblue Trans PAILE ACHR Geographically, this report is segmented into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue (million USD), market share and growth rate of Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), covering United States EU China Japan South Korea India On the basis of product, this report displays the production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, primarily split into Titanium Oxide Type Zirconia Type On the basis on the end users/applications, this report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, consumption (sales), market share and growth rate of Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor for each application, including Commercial Vehicles Passenger Vehicles Global Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Market Research Report 2017 1 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor 1.2 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Segment by Type (Product Category) 1.2.1 Global Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Production and CAGR (%) Comparison by Type (Product Category) (2012-2022) 1.2.2 Global Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Production Market Share by Type (Product Category) in 2016 1.2.3 Titanium Oxide Type 1.2.4 Zirconia Type 1.3 Global Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Segment by Application 1.3.1 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Consumption (Sales) Comparison by Application (2012-2022) 1.3.2 Commercial Vehicles 1.3.3 Passenger Vehicles 1.4 Global Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Market by Region (2012-2022) 1.4.1 Global Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Market Size (Value) and CAGR (%) Comparison by Region (2012-2022) 1.4.2 United States Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.3 EU Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.4 China Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.5 Japan Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.6 South Korea Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.7 India Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor (2012-2022) 1.5.1 Global Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Revenue Status and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.5.2 Global Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Capacity, Production Status and Outlook (2012-2022) 7 Global Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 NGK 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.1.2 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Product Category, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Product A 7.1.2.2 Product B 7.1.3 NGK Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 Bosch 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.2.2 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Product Category, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Product A 7.2.2.2 Product B 7.2.3 Bosch Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 DENSO 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.3.2 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Product Category, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Product A 7.3.2.2 Product B 7.3.3 DENSO Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 Delphi 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.4.2 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Product Category, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Product A 7.4.2.2 Product B 7.4.3 Delphi Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 Kefico 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.5.2 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Product Category, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Product A 7.5.2.2 Product B 7.5.3 Kefico Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 UAES 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.6.2 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Product Category, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Product A 7.6.2.2 Product B 7.6.3 UAES Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.7 VOLKSE 7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.7.2 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Product Category, Application and Specification 7.7.2.1 Product A 7.7.2.2 Product B 7.7.3 VOLKSE Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.8 Pucheng Sensors 7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.8.2 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Product Category, Application and Specification 7.8.2.1 Product A 7.8.2.2 Product B 7.8.3 Pucheng Sensors Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.9 Airblue 7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.9.2 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Product Category, Application and Specification 7.9.2.1 Product A 7.9.2.2 Product B 7.9.3 Airblue Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.10 Trans 7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.10.2 Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Product Category, Application and Specification 7.10.2.1 Product A 7.10.2.2 Product B 7.10.3 Trans Wide Domain Automotive Oxygen Sensor Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.11 PAILE 7.12 ACHR For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/1282455-global-wide-domain-automotive-oxygen-sensor-market-research-report-2017


Reena,ACRA | Sinha B.K.,Div. of Biochemistry | Rai P.K.,ACHR | Jamwal S.,ACRA
Ecology, Environment and Conservation | Year: 2017

Harad is considered to be the mother and king of medicines in Ayurveda. Its fruit has astringent, purgative, antibacterial, antifungal and laxative activity. The country's richest germplasm of harad including Raj Harad exists here. Among the various medicinal plants of Jammu and Kashmir, Terminalia chebula Retz., is one of them. Though the insecticidal/fungicidal potential of essential oils extracted from harad has been discovered, the tree itself is attacked by several insect pests, which needs to be studied. Relatively few studies of the pests affecting Terminalia spp. have been made. Harad trees growing at Advanced Centre for Rainfed Agriculture (ACRA), SKUAST-J, Dhiansar were noticed to be inflicted severely by several insect pests; major among them were the gall forming insects, scales and mealy bugs. Year round study was therefore conducted to identify the gall forming insect; one of the major insect pest. The losses inflicted by them, in terms of reduction in chlorophyll content, photosynthetic area; thereby resulting in economic loss was also assessed. Gall formation was noticed in approximately 30-40% of harad leaves on their underside. These galls were of varied sizes ranging from very small to medium sized during July. Curling of leaves also started along with the formation of galls. The galls were green in colour, exactly of the same colour as that of their leaves and harad fruits, creating confusion from a distance. By the end of October, the galls attain their full size. All this greatly reduced the photosynthetic area and efficiency of leaves. During the end of November - December the galls dry up and turn brown in colour. On dissecting these galls at different stages of their formation, thrips were found inside. The number of thrips varied with the gall size and age. Adults were collected and the specimens were identified by Zoological Survey of India, Kolkata. Two different species namely, Rhipiphorothrips cruentatus and Liothrips sps. of the order Thysanoptera were identified. © EM International.


Boonyabancha S.,ACHR | Mitlin D.,University of Manchester
Environment and Urbanization | Year: 2012

This paper describes the Asian Coalition for Community Action (ACCA) programme that was initiated by the Asian Coalition for Housing Rights (ACHR) in 2009. ACCA seeks to catalyze and support community initiatives, citywide upgrading and partnerships between community organizations and local governments. By January 2012, it had helped fund initiatives in 708 settlements in 153 cities in 19 different Asian nations. In each city, small grants support community-led initiatives that encourage citywide networks to form, where members share skills with each other and learn to negotiate with their local governments. Further support was available as local governments engaged and then came to support this process, including the formation of jointly managed community development funds. The paper also describes how the design of ACCA drew on earlier work, and ends with a reflection on what has been learnt with regard to more effective ways of reducing urban poverty. This explores the two underlying dimensions: first, the creation of institutions based on relations of reciprocity; and second, the strengthening of relations between low-income community organizations such that they can create a synergy with the state. One key lesson is the need for financial systems that allow the urban poor to be the key agents in addressing their problems and in bringing in city governments to work with them. This collaboration can lead to the urban poor being recognized as legitimate and highly productive residents and citizens of the city. © 2012 International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).


Luansang C.,ACHR | Boonmahathanakorn S.,ACHR | Domingo-Price M.L.,Philippine Action for Communityled Shelter Initiatives Inc. PACSII
Environment and Urbanization | Year: 2012

This paper describes the role of community architects in the upgrading programmes supported by the Asian Coalition for Community Action (ACCA), illustrated with examples that include a bamboo bridge project in Davao and a toilet project in Digos (the Philippines), a community-driven land allocation system in Gopalganj (Bangladesh), and upgrading developed by a savings group in a landless community in Hlaing Tar Yar township (Myanmar). Drawing on the authors' experiences working as community architects, it also reflects on how to integrate social and physical change in communities in order to effect broader changes in society. The paper discusses the merits of community architecture and identifies what makes a good community architect, and describes the Community Architects Network (CAN) that has been formed and how it encourages architectural schools to incorporate knowledge and experience from community architects into their curriculum. © 2012 International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).


Carcellar F.N.,PACSII | Kerr T.,ACHR
Environment and Urbanization | Year: 2012

One of the cornerstones of academic legitimacy is the concept of peer review, in which any book, journal article or scholarly exploration that gets published is first assessed by academics from the same sphere of expertise, who are best placed to understand that work. This has not transferred into mainstream development practice, where most development projects (even those being implemented by the urban poor themselves) are not assessed by community groups and NGO supporters who are their peers, but by outside professionals who visit the project briefly. Although these professionals have no expertise in living in informal settlements on very low incomes or avoiding eviction or negotiating with local governments, they pronounce judgement on the project. These supply-driven kinds of assessments and the principle of "judgement by neutral outsiders" does not fit with the concept of demand-driven development processes that are implemented in different ways by different groups in different places, in response to very different local contexts, needs and capacities. The implementation of the Asian Coalition for Community Action (ACCA) programme has sought to build a new, more horizontal system for assessing, learning from and refining the hundreds of projects it supported in different countries. Teams of community leaders, and their partner NGOs who are actively implementing their own ACCA projects, assess the work of their peers in other nations through visits to ACCA projects and discussions with the people who are implementing them. This paper describes the six assessment trips organized so far and how this more demand-driven assessment process is helping adjust and correct problems in the implementation processes in various cities. This has also opened up a large new space for two-way learning, sharing and building mutual assistance links across Asia, and helping expand the range of what community people see as possible. © 2012 International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).


Boonyabancha S.,ACHR | Carcellar F.N.,PACSII | Kerr T.,ACHR
Environment and Urbanization | Year: 2012

This paper suggests that what may appear to be insoluble problems of urban poverty and exclusion in Asian cities can be solved; and that the greatest force to do this already exists, in rough form, in the people who experience that poverty and exclusion themselves and have the greatest motivation to change it. It notes how most government programmes and formal development interventions ignore this force or seek to suppress it, so it remains a potential, not an actual, force for change. The paper describes how the Asian Coalition for Community Action (ACCA) programme, using a few simple tools and conditions and a modest, flexible budget, is trying to unlock that force at scale, opening up new space, new collaborations and new possibilities that are beginning to resolve these problems. The paper describes several of the tools and conditions that are part of the ACCA intervention - the support for collective processes, partnerships, finance and land tenure; for many initiatives on the ground; for moving to work at city scale; for communities prioritizing what gets support; and for building a platform for negotiation and partnership in each city. These are helping people to solve their problems and pave their own literal and metaphorical pathways to freedom, and to legitimate and valued citizenship in their cities. © 2012 International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).


This paper describes people's process, community networks and platforms of work between communities and professionals in Asia; also how these networks, which have reduced the isolation of low-income and disadvantaged communities, have built their confidence, produced finance to support their priorities, legitimized and capacitated their organizations and catalyzed effective action. Networked and informed community groups are increasingly able to lead development processes and work together with government agencies, politicians and other stakeholders, from academics to NGOs. By being unified through a common group or association, community members gain strength in numbers and shared financial capital, opening up many more opportunities than if they worked individually. By giving examples of national networks of the urban poor in Sri Lanka, the Philippines, Mongolia and elsewhere, this paper seeks to demonstrate the value of networks in supporting a people's process of development. © 2012 International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).


Kerr T.,ACHR
Environment and Urbanization | Year: 2015

This paper describes how urban poor community leaders in six nations (Cambodia, Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam) worked together to define poverty, assess its causes, and suggest how best to measure it and address it. Their work drew on over a thousand detailed household expenditure surveys from different settlements in a range of cities in the six nations. Five distinct groups could be distinguished among these urban poor households, and the work suggested that two poverty lines were needed. The community leaders also reviewed national and international poverty lines and found these to be incompatible with reality, especially the US$ 1.25/person/day poverty line. The paper draws some conclusions and describes plans for the country teams to further this work, including engaging with their national governments over the definition and measurement of urban poverty. © 2015, © 2015 International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).


Boonyabancha S.,ACHR
Environment and Urbanization | Year: 2012

This paper is from a transcript of a conversation between Ruby Papeleras and Ofelia Bagotlo, two community leaders in the Homeless People's Federation Philippines Inc. and Somsook Boonyabancha from the Asian Coalition for Housing Rights. The community leaders reflect on the difficulties that community organizations face in finding solutions - for instance, getting land and getting local governments, donors and activists to respect their priorities. They describe the steps towards building an urban poor movement - learning to trust ourselves, building this trust by establishing community savings groups and instigating initiatives (which show other groups their capabilities and other urban poor groups what is possible), drawing everyone in and using their different skills in surveying and undertaking community initiatives. They also discuss how the flexible funding for small projects available through the ACCA programme helps catalyze local activities while they wait for government. Small grants or revolving fund loans can be managed by communities, so the financial management makes people more powerful in terms of planning, prioritizing, decision-making and implementing projects. Small projects also help prepare communities for larger, more difficult housing projects and bolster their negotiations for land (showing their capacity to pay and invest). With no solutions on offer from government or the private sector, community people begin to take over, creating a movement in which people are finding alternative solutions that are cheap, efficient, easy, quick, equitable and full of the social elements that are missing from government-provided housing. From this they show local governments what they can do. Small projects are a bridge to link different individuals and agencies, and provide a language for dialogue between them. © 2012 International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).

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