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Accenture plc is a multinational management consulting, technology services, and outsourcing company. Its incorporated headquarters are in Dublin, Ireland since September 1, 2009. It is the world's largest consulting firm as measured by revenues and is a Fortune Global 500 company. As of 2014, the company reported net revenues of $30.0 billion with approximately 319,000 employees, serving clients in more than 200 cities in 56 countries. Accenture has more employees in India than in any other country; in the US, it has about 40,000 employees and 35,000 located in the Philippines. Accenture's current clients include 89 of the Fortune Global 100 and more than three-quarters of the Fortune Global 500.Accenture common equity is listed on the New York Stock Exchange, under the symbol ACN, and was added to the S&P 500 index on July 5, 2011. Wikipedia.

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CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Navigant (NYSE: NCI) today announced six senior-level industry experts have joined the company’s growing global Energy segment John Roddy, managing director; Ted Walker, managing director; René Groot Bruinderink, director; Andrew Johnston, director; Laura Manz, director; and Konstantin Staschus, director, are seasoned energy industry experts with the unique insights clients rely on to adapt and thrive in a changing energy landscape. Roddy brings a deep knowledge of strategy and operations to ensure utility clients are maximizing their investments, while Walker’s rich knowledge and vision related to the energy transformation offers stability in a time of uncertainty. Johnston takes a strategic and client-centric approach to smart city opportunities by focusing on local contexts and precedents, and Groot Bruinderink relies on an understanding of the link between government policies, technological innovation, and end-user needs to create low carbon strategies for clients. Manz uses her expertise in transmission and performance excellence to offer guidance and source innovative solutions, and Staschus, the former secretary-general of the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E), applies his knowledge in solving client business and strategic problems with a focus on transmission. “Collectively, John, Ted, René, Andrew, Laura, and Konstantin represent more than a century of relevant experience, and individually they are already helping our clients navigate a steady path forward based on strategic advice and unique industry perspectives,” said Jan Vrins, managing director and leader of Navigant’s global Energy segment. “We view their hiring as an investment in Navigant’s future and specifically as an investment in our clients and the trust that they place in us to assist in the complex decisions around emerging technologies, industry changes, and operational excellence.” With more than 25 years of utility industry experience, Roddy is passionate about leveraging his expertise in strategy and operations to assist clients with business and technology planning. He is a trusted advisor on wholesale and retail electric markets, technology assessment and road map planning, business architecture solutions, smart grid/smart metering, business process/performance improvement, and revenue cycle systems. Roddy’s career spans the majority of the utility value chain and encompasses U.S. and international engagements with utilities, regional transmission organizations/independent system operators, energy merchants, industry suppliers, municipalities, professional service firms, and research organizations. Prior to joining Navigant, Roddy operated his own consulting firm, was a leadership partner in Accenture’s North American Utility Practice, and served as the senior executive lead of strategic programs for Black & Veatch’s management consulting division. A key leader in the areas of strategy, policy, and regulation, Walker uses his expertise to hone in on energy company growth opportunities and help clients thrive alongside the changing role of the utility in an evolving energy ecosystem. His knowledge spans the areas of energy retail, transmission and distribution, customer front and back-office, and shared services. Walker also has significant experience working with medium and large electric and gas utilities to develop and plan strategies that extend beyond the business as usual mindset. Prior to joining Navigant, Walker served as a managing director in Accenture’s Utilities Strategy practice. His content focus areas include distributed energy resources, alternative transportation fuels – including electric vehicles, non-commodity products and services, digital customer transformation, innovation strategy, mergers and acquisitions, and emerging technologies, with a particular depth in blockchain. Dedicated to sustainability, Groot Bruinderink focuses on helping clients transition their businesses toward a low carbon future, while capturing short-term business opportunities as well as dealing with reorganizational transitions arising from the energy shift. He is skilled at developing tailor-made proposals to help clients realize sustainable and profitable products and business models. With more than two decades of consulting experience for large corporations and energy companies, Groot Bruinderink has served clients across the retail, utilities, and telecom sectors, in addition to the construction and chemical industries. He spent nearly 10 years at RWE and its successor Innogy, predominantly as a partner responsible for the in-house consulting unit in the Netherlands and Belgium. Groot Bruinderink is a former director of Essent’s strategy department and has also served as a senior manager at Arthur D. Little. With a background spanning the energy, technology, policy, and urban planning sectors, Johnston works to achieve strategic technology implementation among utility clients, cities, manufacturers, and third-party groups. As an expert in aligning policy and program execution with the larger strategic priorities of utilities, his focus also addresses the areas of independent evaluation, quantitative and qualitative analysis, contingency planning, market analysis, and competitive intelligence. Prior to Navigant, Johnston was president of ETS, for Zpryme. He has also served in a variety of roles at organizations centered around emerging technology, including Austin Energy and Pecan Street Inc. Johnston is a former chief of staff to economic and social theorist Jeremy Rifkin and is the 2014 recipient of the Austin Under 40 Award for Energy & Technology. Focused on utility operations and performance excellence, Manz leverages her expertise in transmission planning and grid operations to provide the insights clients need on pressing industry topics. With more than 30 years of related experience, she is well-versed in the areas of transmission planning and technical studies, policy, bulk grid reliability requirements, generator interconnections, advanced grid technologies, the effects of distributed generation on the power grid, and, particularly, independent system operator requirements and trends. Prior to joining Navigant, Manz was instrumental in forming PJM and its signature nodal market design. She has also managed her own consulting practice with projects in every interconnection in North America. Most recently, Manz was a vice president of market and infrastructure development for the California ISO and a senior vice president at Viridity Energy . Her utility experience also extends to San Diego Gas and Electric, Southern California Gas Company, and Public Service Electric and Gas Company. Manz is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and a member of Cleantech San Diego’s Education and Outreach Committee. An expert in EU energy policy, and the former Secretary-General of ENTSO-E, Staschus focuses on advising European transmission system operator clients and working to shape markets, grids, and systems for the energy transformation. Drawing on more than 30 years of industry experience, Staschus leverages strengths in multicultural management to combine business value with public interest thinking, relying on a technical, economic, and analytical approach. While at ENTSO-E, Staschus contributed to network code drafts, 10-year network development plans, and a transparency platform for EU-wide fundamental electricity system data. In his new role, he continues to chair two of the organization’s research and development committees. Prior to Navigant, Staschus served as a member of BDEW, Berlin’s association of energy and water industries, as managing director of VDN, Germany’s association of network operators, and in roles at the association of German TSOs, DVG, as well as Pacific Gas and Electric. Navigant Consulting, Inc. (NYSE: NCI) is a specialized, global professional services firm that helps clients take control of their future. Navigant’s professionals apply deep industry knowledge, substantive technical expertise, and an enterprising approach to help clients build, manage, and/or protect their business interests. With a focus on markets and clients facing transformational change and significant regulatory or legal pressures, the firm primarily serves clients in the healthcare, energy, and financial services industries. Across a range of advisory, consulting, outsourcing, and technology/analytics services, Navigant’s practitioners bring sharp insight that pinpoints opportunities and delivers powerful results. More information about Navigant can be found at navigant.com.


Alex Tapscott, pioneer and author of the bestseller Blockchain Revolution, will appear for the first time in Europe at DES2017 with his talk on Blockchain , in which he will look at why blockchain technologies (a global, open and distributed information platform) will change what we can achieve online, how we do it and who can take part. Tapscott will present his theory of how blockchain will give rise to a new development scenario in subjects as diverse as healthcare, education, government and public administration, finance or business. Alex Tapscott will be joined on the panel of speakers by Lilian P. Coral, City of Los Angeles CDO, who will present the GeoHUB portal, based on GIS technology developed by Esri, which connects information that directly affects around 4 million members of the public, businesspeople and civil servants in the city of Los Angeles. With this platform, users, public services and citizens can access more than 500 layers of maps to check information or develop their own apps. GeoHUB also uses smart maps to bring together information from all over the city, allowing police officers, firefighters and the emergency services to make critical decisions in real time, based on a single point of access and on any device. "DES is the only event of its kind worldwide that deals with the digital transformation or a comprehensive process that affects companies in all areas of business, from technologies as transformation facilitators to business culture as a foundation for success in the digital evolution," says Lluis Altés, Strategy Director of DES|Digital Business World Congress. For the full list of speakers, please visit https://www.des-madrid.com/congress/2017-speakers/ The latest edition of this major meeting on digital transformation is supported by the leaders of the international technology industry. In just two editions, DES will have become the place to go for new technologies, where companies such as Amazon, IBM, Intel, Google, Accenture and Deloitte bring new solutions for banking, industry, retail, logistics, the automotive sector, telecommunications and the energy sector, among others. More than 18,000 delegates from 40 different countries will encounter a congress with more than 450 speakers and 180 talks on technological strategy and trends, such as Blockchain , Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, Cloud Computing, the Internet of Things, Big Data and Analytics and Cybersecurity. For a summary of the previous edition, you can visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXWWs1znk1I For further information about the event or if you are interested in interviewing any of the speakers, please don't hesitate to contact us.


Alex Tapscott, pioneer and author of the bestseller Blockchain Revolution, will appear for the first time in Europe at DES2017 with his talk on Blockchain , in which he will look at why blockchain technologies (a global, open and distributed information platform) will change what we can achieve online, how we do it and who can take part. Tapscott will present his theory of how blockchain will give rise to a new development scenario in subjects as diverse as healthcare, education, government and public administration, finance or business. Alex Tapscott will be joined on the panel of speakers by Lilian P. Coral, City of Los Angeles CDO, who will present the GeoHUB portal, based on GIS technology developed by Esri, which connects information that directly affects around 4 million members of the public, businesspeople and civil servants in the city of Los Angeles. With this platform, users, public services and citizens can access more than 500 layers of maps to check information or develop their own apps. GeoHUB also uses smart maps to bring together information from all over the city, allowing police officers, firefighters and the emergency services to make critical decisions in real time, based on a single point of access and on any device. "DES is the only event of its kind worldwide that deals with the digital transformation or a comprehensive process that affects companies in all areas of business, from technologies as transformation facilitators to business culture as a foundation for success in the digital evolution," says Lluis Altés, Strategy Director of DES|Digital Business World Congress. For the full list of speakers, please visit https://www.des-madrid.com/congress/2017-speakers/ The latest edition of this major meeting on digital transformation is supported by the leaders of the international technology industry. In just two editions, DES will have become the place to go for new technologies, where companies such as Amazon, IBM, Intel, Google, Accenture and Deloitte bring new solutions for banking, industry, retail, logistics, the automotive sector, telecommunications and the energy sector, among others. More than 18,000 delegates from 40 different countries will encounter a congress with more than 450 speakers and 180 talks on technological strategy and trends, such as Blockchain , Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, Cloud Computing, the Internet of Things, Big Data and Analytics and Cybersecurity. For a summary of the previous edition, you can visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXWWs1znk1I For further information about the event or if you are interested in interviewing any of the speakers, please don't hesitate to contact us.


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Companies that leverage the right combination of new technology could increase their market capitalization by an average of more than US$6 billion, according to Accenture’s evaluation of 10 digital technologies across eight industries. Accenture (NYSE:ACN) carried out the economic modelling after its initial research revealed that only 13 percent of executives at more than 900 large companies said their businesses are getting both greater efficiency and business growth through new revenue streams from their investments in digital technologies. Accenture believes this is due largely to piecemeal deployment and implementation of investments in digital technologies. For the economic modelling, Accenture examined a range of technological combinations that could best help companies with sales revenues of $1 billion or more in the automotive, chemicals, consumer goods and services, electronic and high-tech, energy, life sciences and utilities industries significantly reduce their cost per employee and grow their market capitalization. While they vary across industries, the combinations of the technologies—including 3D printing, artificial intelligence (AI), augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR), autonomous robots, autonomous vehicles, big data analytics, blockchain, digital twin, machine learning and mobile computing -- can have a significant impact. For instance, companies in the industrial-equipment sector could realize additional cost savings of more than $43,000 per employee if they combined robotics, AI, blockchain, big data and 3D-printing technologies. Energy companies could gain more than $16 billion in market capitalization if they combined technologies such as virtual reality, big data and AI. “More than just transforming into digital businesses, companies must completely reinvent their operating models, production and value chains to create more value with digital,” said Aidan Quilligan, managing director and lead for Accenture’s Industry X.0 practice. “But our research yields a concrete solution: what we call Industry X.0. It’s an action plan for becoming more adept at embracing technological change and profiting from it.” Industry X.0 is how Accenture defines the digital reinvention of industry, when businesses use advanced digital technologies to transform their core operations, their worker and customer experiences and ultimately their business models. New levels of efficiency are achieved in the core of R&D, engineering, production, manufacturing and business support through integrated systems, processes, sensors and new intelligence. Worker and customer experiences are reimagined and redesigned through personalization and advances such as immersive, augmented and virtual reality. New business models and revenue streams are unlocked by smart, connected products, services and plants that are enabled by new ecosystems. The level of demand for Industry X.0 is revealed in Accenture’s survey of 931 executives from 21 countries. Among the respondents, 80 percent want new efficiencies, new growth and new experiences to be delivered all at the same time and that 64 percent agree that failure to leverage the components of digital value will cause them to struggle for survival in the future. The executive research also revealed a key challenge that will hinder the ability of businesses to innovate with connected and intelligent products. There is a shortage of digital skills among their workforces that is preventing them from innovating with connected and intelligent products (29 percent). “Most of the business leaders we work with understand the power of digital. They see the potential for digital technologies to bring about transformation and growth and are making big investments in a variety of leading technologies,” said Dave Abood, senior managing director, Resources, Growth & Strategy. “Unfortunately, many aren’t getting the most out of their digital investments. The challenge is that to do so requires a careful balance of transforming core businesses while scaling new ones, which demands new talent, new skills and new competencies in managing the pivot.” There is positive news for the current workforce, as it is expected that key digital technologies will create new jobs as companies reinvent themselves to reflect Industry X.0. The research indicates that deployment of connected and intelligent products, systems and plant will lead not only to the addition of new responsibilities to existing roles, but also to the creation of entirely new roles. More than half (55 percent) of executives surveyed said they believe that more new roles (in terms of responsibility) will be created than might be eliminated, and approximately the same number of executives (56 percent) said they believe that existing roles will be expanded or evolve. Accenture surveyed 931 senior executives from large companies across 12 industries and 21 industrial countries to understand how companies deploy digital technologies and the benefits they derive from them. We then identified a set of 10 critical technologies; 3D printing, AI, AR/VR, autonomous robots, autonomous vehicles, big data analytics, blockchain, digital twin, machine learning and mobile computing. We used both survey data and company financial data to perform an Economic Value Modelling exercise designed to identify the technology combinations with the biggest impact on top-line and bottom-line value release, as measured by market capitalization and cost-per-employee. We identified the optimum mix of technologies by combining results from machine learning and principal component analysis. Accenture is a leading global professional services company, providing a broad range of services and solutions in strategy, consulting, digital, technology and operations. Combining unmatched experience and specialized skills across more than 40 industries and all business functions – underpinned by the world’s largest delivery network – Accenture works at the intersection of business and technology to help clients improve their performance and create sustainable value for their stakeholders. With approximately 425,000 people serving clients in more than 120 countries, Accenture drives innovation to improve the way the world works and lives. Visit us at www.accenture.com.


News Article | December 12, 2016
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

Community energy is the next big threat to utility companies – unless they manage to become part of this emerging energy economy. They still have a window of opportunity, says Craig Cavanaugh of software services company Omnetric Group, who spent six months researching the energy community market in Europe and the US. He sees three main opportunities for utilities: they can become “collaborative partner”, “community energy service provider” or “community energy platform provider”. In all cases technology is the key. “If utilities don’t move, communities will act on their own”. “Community Energy is potentially one of the most important forces to disrupt the energy system”, says Craig Cavanaugh, CEO for the Americas of Omnetric Group, a joint-venture of Accenture and Siemens which provides technology solutions to the energy market. Cavanaugh and his team spent the past six months on research, and held interviews with community energy leaders and utility executives in Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, the UK and USA. They published their findings on 17 November in a white paper ‘Power to the People’. Technological developments, for example in microgrids and blockchain technology, are quickly making it possible for communities – which could be consumer groups, businesses, or local governments – to engage in common projects for generation, distribution, management and consumption of energy. Although no one knows how big the energy community market could become, it is clear, says Cavanaugh, that consumers are highly receptive to it. One study from Accenture found that 69% of consumers are interested in participating on an energy trading platform and 47% plan to sign up for a community solar program, managed by a third party, even if they do not have solar panels on their property. Cavanaugh and his team found that the primary motivation for community energy participants is economic, as, according to the white paper, “a single household could make a one-off per capita saving of nearly $4,000 compared to going it alone, as well as hedge against future electricity price increases reaching upwards of 3% per year.” Two other motivating factors are: the dangers of climate change, and “growing distrust of large public institutions.” Those large public institutions could be utilities of course. Nevertheless, Cavanaugh does feel there are opportunities for utilities to get involved in community energy. His research found that communities often lack “the in-depth technology and business knowledge” to realize their ambitions. Here is where utilities could come in. “What the business opportunities are for utilities is very much dependent on geography, the type of regulatory structure, and the type of ownership,” says Cavanaugh. But technology is key to bringing community energy projects and utilities closer together, he notes. According to the white paper, although historically there has been some unwillingness by utilities to engage with community energy, currently more and more of them are getting involved with communities and initiating joint discussions. Top of the agenda for discussion are the opportunities afforded by current technologies for more active management of the energy grid at a community level. “For example, utilities can offer grid services for small-scale renewables generation,” says Cavanaugh, referring to the example of ‘Microgrid in the Cloud’, a remotely-hosted, microgrid control solution, based on the Siemens Microgrid Management System. “Cloud-based delivery enables flexibility and affordability, and enables microgrid deployment with less know-how than a traditional solution, since it is hosted, managed and maintained by the provider.” Cavanaugh explains: “Microgrids are not only for areas beyond reach of the traditional grid. A utility could deploy a microgrid for enhanced system resilience – for example, as might be required by a ‘sensitive’ site, such as military or government. Or it could build a microgrid in response to community demand, like Hawaii’s ambition for 100-percent renewably powered energy in the electricity sector by 2045.” Another real-life example is that by the city of Fort Collins in Colorado. The municipality-run utility, Fort Collins Utilities, offers residents and businesses renewable energy for an additional 2.4 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) and provides electricity service to 90,000 residential and commercial customers at the sixth lowest rate in the state. It is a partner in the low carbon district initiative FortZED, which includes private sector partners testing out technologies that reduce peak energy use and integrate renewable energy into the grid in collaboration with an actively engaged consumer base. “They’ve done this in the right way. The city administration decided to provide clean energy services to its citizens, enabling a positive feedback loop and attracting private companies to the benefit of ratepayers, as well as bringing the utility and customers together,” says Cavanaugh. Among the different roles that utilities can adopt in relation to community energy projects, the white paper outlines three main opportunities: Omnetric Group has developed a community energy concept, the Prosumer Energy Management Platform, which communities – and utilities – could use in their collective energy initiatives. It is a software-based platform that allows a community to measure, monitor and manage power generation and consumption across all households and businesses connected to its distribution system. The platform demonstrates the types of solution already available for use in community energy projects. It can be used by communities or by utilities to support community energy projects. A major factor in how far or how fast the envisaged collaboration between communities and utilities progresses is the regulatory framework. Although regulatory issues were not examined in detail in the research, the white paper states that “communities and utilities would do well to strongly encourage regulators to provide some degree of flexibility in the system,”’ and notes that “regulatory uncertainty slows progress.” One example of forward-thinking regulatory reform is New York’s Reforming the Energy Vision (REV), which supports the city’s mandate to generate 50 percent of the state’s electricity needs from renewable energy by 2030, and in doing so brings system efficiency and energy efficiency into the core business of the utility. A recent order (14-00581) approved by the New York State Public Service Commission calls for the use of markets and new regulations to achieve increased system efficiency, carbon reductions and customer empowerment, and by aligning utility profits with market-enabling activities, sets up a new business model for utilities. Cavanuagh: “This is an example of where a city decides that ‘our citizenry aspires to use only green energy. ’ There’s a progressive awareness of what energy consumption means – for the planet, wallet, and community. As shown by developments like the New York REV, there is certainly a business opportunity for developers and utilities in working with a group of prosumers, and offering infrastructure as service.” “Renewables just keep getting cheaper, and that’s a real opportunity to engage in a new way. It’s no longer a traditional marketplace – we are moving to a place where your neighbor says ‘you can buy solar power from me’ and you will be able to. That’s the future. If utilities don’t move, then communities will act on their own.”


NEW YORK, NY--(Marketwired - Mar 1, 2017) - The world's most advanced enterprise and startup blockchain innovators have formed an alliance to build, promote, and broadly support Ethereum-based technology best practices, standards, and a reference architecture, EntEth 1.0. The Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) seeks to augment Ethereum, enabling it to serve as an enterprise-grade technology, with research and development focused on privacy, confidentiality, scalability, and security. EEA will also investigate hybrid architectures that span both permissioned and public Ethereum networks. The founding members of the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance rotating board include Accenture, Banco Santander, BlockApps, BNY Mellon, CME Group, ConsenSys, IC3, Intel, J.P. Morgan, Microsoft, and Nuco. Additional founding members include AMIS, Andui, BBVA, brainbot technologies, BP, Chronicled, Credit Suisse, Cryptape, Fubon Financial, ING, The Institutes, Monax, String Labs, Telindus, Tendermint, Thomson Reuters, UBS, VidRoll, and Wipro, among others. Many initial members have developed pilots and production environments using Ethereum and bring unique understandings of enterprise needs. These include supply chain provenance tracking, inter-bank payments, reference data, securities settlement, and many others. Ethereum is a blockchain-based, general purpose decentralized application platform, enabling smart contract functionality. It employs the Ethereum Virtual Machine and the Solidity programming language to directly implement and execute peer-to-peer and multiparty agreements among other applications. This technology facilitates more efficient and secure transactions without centralized intermediation. Notably, Ethereum blockchain technology will improve banking trade settlement latency, increase transparency in supply chains, and create peer-to-peer markets where intermediaries typically were previously needed between counterparties. "Ethereum is already one of, if not the, most widely used technologies for developing and deploying enterprise blockchains.  Enterprises love the availability of open-source implementations, a single standard, the rapidly growing developer ecosystem, and availability of talent. But enterprises expect resilient secure systems and a robust controls environment. EEA aims to bring these together, both to provide enterprises the forum they need and also to advance Ethereum generally," said Jeremy Millar, founding board member of EEA. EEA will collectively develop industry standards and facilitate open source collaboration with its member base as well as the Ethereum Chief Scientist and Inventor, Vitalik Buterin, and is open to any members of the Ethereum community who wish to participate. This collaborative framework will enable the mass adoption at a depth and breadth otherwise unachievable in individual corporate silos and provide insight to the future of scalability, privacy, and confidentiality of the public Ethereum permissionless network. "The Enterprise Ethereum Alliance project can play an important role in standardizing approaches for privacy, permissioning and providing alternative consensus algorithms to improve its usability in enterprise settings, and the resources the project and its members are contributing should accelerate the advancement of the Ethereum ecosystem generally," said Mr. Buterin, "I look forward to continuing to work with everyone involved." "Ethereum has one of the broadest developer user bases across industries. The Ethereum Enterprise Alliance will add power to this innovative tool and make it applicable for enterprises and corporates. It underscores Accenture's commitment to making blockchain real for clients. We are very pleased to be part of this important initiative." "AMIS is a blockchain technology company rooted in Asia, but as its French-inspired name suggests, also connected to the world. We have been fortunate to partner with some of the most prominent enterprises and research organizations in Greater China, and through the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance, look forward to extending those partnerships globally." "Our team at Andui fully endorses Enterprise Ethereum Alliance's values and goals. We set out shortly after Ethereum was launched, in July 2015, with the mission to allow individuals and enterprises alike to access platforms for equal opportunities in financial collaborations. We are focusing on the development of a value web with inter-connected and inter-operable chains, in the spirit that compatibility and standardization facilitate access." "Like many financial institutions, Santander has been actively exploring the use of distributed ledger technology and Ethereum has been one of the platforms-of-choice on which to build proof-of-concepts and prototypes. With its large developer community, 1.5 years of testing in a public environment, and multiple implementations, Santander is enthusiastic in its support of the goals of the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance and its goal of developing a single set of standards for using Ethereum in an enterprise setting." "It's time for different industries to collaborate in order to take advantage of the disruption that blockchain represents. We believe that Ethereum Enterprise Alliance is key to create common standards and practices that will really help to bring the blockchain advantages to businesses process in a secure and efficient way." -- Carlos Kuchkovsky, CTO of New Digital Business at BBVA "As the leading enterprise blockchain-as-a-service software provider, we are proud to be one of the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance founding members. We see tremendous adoption of production grade deployments for Ethereum-enabled blockchain applications. Unlike other consortiums, the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance is here to represent production enterprise interoperability requirements and ensure that software vendors, like BlockApps, deliver future proof solutions and eliminate the vendor lock-in risk to a proprietary blockchain framework." "The Ethereum community and technology stack holds great promise for both the public network users and within the enterprise, where there are specific requirements that we will address collaboratively through the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance." "At brainbot technologies, we've been faced with industry requirements early on when creating PoCs and advising FI's / major companies from other industries. Consequently, we built Hydrachain, the first permissioned variant of Ethereum. We're convinced, that second layer technologies like the Raiden Network we are developing, will play a crucial role on the path to broad industry adoption of distributed ledger technologies. Our team is enthusiastic about this initiative as well as the continued collaboration and progress and we're looking forward to contributing to the benefit of the entire ecosystem." "We chose to build our Internet of Things platform solutions on Ethereum because it offered a robust and scalable smart contract infrastructure. We are excited that the EEA is emerging to lead the development of reference architectures for enterprise-grade blockchain solutions. Secure and scalable blockchain infrastructure and IoT together have the potential to herald in the fourth industrial revolution." "In our enterprise consulting work we advise prospective clients to build a blockchain stack on Ethereum, because private permissioned versions of Ethereum represent the most capable, best hardened blockchain architectures for those contexts. It will grow increasingly important that enterprise builds on private infrastructure that is compatible with the public Ethereum mainnet, allowing enterprises using private, permissioned versions to eventually capture the value of the public blockchain when they develop use cases that can take advantage of the public network. The Enterprise Ethereum Alliance was designed to enable organizations to easily deploy a single standard blockchain stack and build applications on that stack for the public, permissionless blockchain as well as for private, permissioned Ethereum blockchains.  The EEA may turn out to be the most important project of 2017 in the blockchain ecosystem." "As a long-time supporter of Ethereum technology, Cryptape is honored to be a member of the EEA. The success of a global standard of commercial blockchain needs the participation of Chinese enterprises, and we will, as always, work with the whole community to make it come true." "Fubon Financial has commercialized the Ethereum blockchain protocol with its BraveLog service. Now it looks forward to collaborating with other enterprises around the world to develop innovative applications that cross industry and geographic boundaries in a compliant and secure fashion. As a leading financial services firm in Greater China, we are proud to contribute to the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance." "The Initiative for CryptoCurrencies and Contracts (IC3) is advancing solutions to meet the needs of permissioned blockchains such as ensuring complete user confidentiality with the capability to audit accounts and transactions. We look forward to continuing our collaborations with the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance membership and supporting the needs of the financial community." "For ING, leading edge technology is the key to developing innovative solutions for our customers and the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance is a perfect example of how we play at the forefront of these developments. Ethereum is an extremely powerful multi-purpose blockchain and we're proud to partner with the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance to leverage this computing platform to seek efficient and secure propositions for our clients." "The Institutes, as a non-profit dedicated to serving the risk management and insurance industry, is working to bring the insurance industry together in a blockchain consortium. The Ethereum Virtual Machine and associated smart contracts have the potential to magnify our industry's ability to effectively protect and help its diverse client base. The Institutes is excited to be a founding member of the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance and assist in efforts to propel this vision." -- Peter L. Miller, CPCU, President and CEO of The Institutes "J.P. Morgan is an active supporter of both emerging technologies and open source projects. We look forward to continuing to advance the state-of-the-art in blockchain technology with the diverse expertise and collaborative energy of the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance." "At Microsoft, we are proud to be a founding member and board member of the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance to continue the advancement of enterprise grade blockchain platforms. Participating with the Ethereum community to implement open standards will accelerate deployment of blockchain solutions. In addition, Microsoft Azure's open, global scale cloud infrastructure and platform services provide fertile ground for the evolution of Ethereum into the enterprise." "Monax's Ethereum Virtual Machine implementation was the world's first EVM with permissioning. It is currently in use at many of the world's best companies, including global tier 1 banks, Deloitte, and SWIFT. We are very pleased to be joining the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance as a founding member, look forward to contributing our knowledge and expertise, and will ensure that our EVM continues to meet or exceed the requirements of the Enterprise Ethereum specification as it evolves." "Nuco has been a leading company in developing enterprise infrastructure functionalities into the Ethereum protocol, with a focus on security, scalability, and performance. Our work to date includes developing a new consensus algorithm and a high performance API within our modular framework. We're committed to actively contributing to and shaping these evolving standards, and we're extremely proud to be a Founding Member of this important initiative." "String Labs is hugely excited by the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance and the support it can provide to organizations using the world's best blockchain technology." "Blockchain tech is getting rapid enterprise adoption. The flexibility of Ethereum make it the leading contender for smart contract applications. We are excited to work with Enterprise Ethereum to bring Tendermint consensus to Ethereum-based applications ensuring the security and speed required." "Thomson Reuters has been an early innovator alongside our customers, startups, and industry organizations to accelerate the enterprise adoption of blockchain to realize its transformative potential across industries. We are excited to join forces again with our customers and the industry on Enterprise Ethereum." "UBS has actively used Ethereum to explore the potential of blockchain technology for the past two years. We are enthusiastic that the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance provides a platform to collaborate on the development of open standards, features, and architectures required for industry-wide adoption of the technology." "Wipro is excited to be part of the founding team of the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance and contribute towards key aspects around security, privacy, and scalability as these will be key determinants in the pace of blockchain adoption within enterprises. The Enterprise Ethereum Alliance is a great way to accelerate enterprise adoption and is increasingly one of the technologies used by our clients for developing and deploying enterprise blockchains. The Enterprise Ethereum Alliance is a critical platform that allows developers to collaborate with the growing community of blockchain developers. We look forward to working actively on this project to shape blockchain adoption within enterprises."


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

The disruption and the opportunities being offered by solar PV and battery storage are likely to be accelerated massively by the introduction of new software such as the “blockchain” system that has already taken root in financial systems, writes Giles Parkinson of the leading Australian energy website Reneweconomy. Courtesy: Reneweconomy.com. As more than 200,000 solar households in Australia get ready to lose their premium feed-in-tariffs at the end of the year, most are wondering “what’s next” for their electricity arrangements. But the same question is being posed by big utilities, who are facing a scale and pace of disruption that could never have been anticipated. Much has been written – on this website and elsewhere – about the impact of the (still) plunging cost of solar and the arrival of battery storage. But the disruption offered by these technologies will be accelerated strongly by the introduction of new software, such as blockchain technology, which was first used in bitcoin transactions. This technology holds the promise of lower bills for consumers, more localised and community-based energy, greater resilience for the entire electricity system, and huge implications for incumbent business and regulators as they struggle to keep pace. And all this as regulators and market operators, as well as the fossil fuel lobby, look to old solutions to new problems, and continue to play down the benefits and promise of these new technologies. The new technologies will allow for smaller and smaller participants to transact energy in the retail and wholesale markets, through peer-to-peer rating and community-focused energy systems – such as micro-grids – and in some instances may by-pass some incumbents altogether. Two of the closest observers of the transition of the energy utility business model have been Lawrence Orsini, the principal of US-based firm LO3, which has recently set up shop in Australia, and the team at Accenture Australia, led by Ann Burns and Simon Vardy. The New York-based Orsini, who is in Australia to present at a major networks and utilities conference in Sydney this week, says the business models of utilities are being “shaken apart” by the changes in technology and the arrival of the “sharing” economy. LO3 is involved in the Brooklyn micro-grid project in New York, part of their “reshaping the power vision” project, and in Germany. But he says the most interest has come from Australia, and several trials are expected to be announced in coming The Australia interest, he says, comes as a result of the uptake of solar, the anticipated boom in battery storage, high energy costs, and the fact that the grid has not been built to be resilient. That latter comment may come as a shock to those who justified the massive spending on infrastructure in recent years on meeting the 99.998 per cent reliability standard that is designed to allow just 11 minutes of outage per customer a year. But the South Australia blackout proved a lie to that. And rather than being the fault of wind energy, as many pretended, the experience has underlined the fragility of Australia’s reliance on large centralised generators and huge networks that transport the energy hundreds of even thousands of kilometres. Just about everyone agrees that the way to provide a more secure, and low cost grid, is to focus on localised energy, featuring local power and sharing – a concept that Orsini describes as “transactive energy. ” The blockchain technology is important because it can offer a “cryptographically secure”, distributed ledger that can track where electricity was generated, where it can travel to and who used it. “There is no question about where you got your kilowatt hour, where it came from and how it was produced,” he says. It is transparent and secure, and will make it easier for new and smaller players to be involved, right down to the individual solar household. In effect, another major step towards the democratisation of energy. Orsini says his company is focused on the physical transaction of energy, not the financial transactions. The key, he says, is in the need for fast-acting load responses, storage, controllable generation and reaction time. “So what we need is a transitive grid,” Orsini tells RenewEconomy in an interview. “We are going to hit a tipping point where this is going to shift very fast. “Any energy system that is running high on renewables, in combination with non-renewables and storage, needs to move to a market model that recognizes the value of a “negawatt” (the power you don’t use) as well as the value of megawatt. The grid architecture will change very quickly.” Orsini says the Brooklyn project has already provided some valuable lessons, in particularly the interest from consumers in where their electric power comes from. “I was skeptical that people would have an interest in where energy is coming from, but Brooklyn shook that up a bit. I didn’t understand how much of  a driver was renewable energy, for solar on the rooftop, for community projects, and for their environmental benefits. In Brooklyn they want their electrons to be Brooklyn electrons.” He says one of the biggest drivers in Australia will be location-based models for energy production, transportation and consumption. “If you are buying your electricity from far away – and if you not paying for that cost, then it is socialised. You never see the real cost. As soon as you start paying for the real cost then the grid re-organises itself. You will want to pay for stuff that is closer. We used to have no choice but to have a centralised, monopoly grid, but we don’t need to do that any more.” Orsini points to research by consultancy firm Accenture that suggests that 80 per cent of consumers want to “participate” in the market, not as active traders perhaps but certainly not as passive as they had been. “I still don’t know that that computes with me,” Orsini admitted. RenewEconomy recently interviewed Accenture energy experts Ann Burns and Simon Vardy, who are in no doubt about the shift in attitude of consumers – enabled by solar and storage – and the role that blockchain will play in that. “The consumer will drive the agenda more and more,” says Burns. Sharing and community focused energy is “not something that can be prevented.” Vardy says that blockchain has the capacity to “cut out the middle men” which may include retailers and generators, and the uptake will be driven by the changing consumer landscape and the emergence of the “millennial” as the largest consumer cohort – a position they will reach by 2020. This article was first published on the leading Australian energy website Reneweconomy.com and is republished here with permission. See also the recent article by Sophie Vorrath, “Blockchain network disruption coming, and Australia among pioneers”, on Reneweconomy.com.


News Article | August 22, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

Who am I? I was born somewhere between the early 1980s and mid 2000s. According to research, I’m well educated, highly tech-savvy, skeptical by nature and street smart; well informed, value-driven and well paid – but also motivated by more than just the hip pocket. Yes, I’m a Millennial. And as part of Australia’s second-largest cohort (20.5 per cent of the total population) after Generation X, I’m the next great engine of the consumer economy. So what do I want from my energy company? That is the question a recent Accenture survey has sought to address, and the findings are a clarion call to those utilities and retailers who still believe business-as-usual will do. Globally, what the survey found was a generation of energy users who are not only digital natives, but children of the “sharing economy”, who expect to be able to invest in and benefit from solar power generation, even if they don’t have a rooftop to install it on; who are actively interested in trading on the energy marketplace; and who absolutely expect to be able to monitor and control their energy profiles – like their social media profiles – via their mobile phone. And for those new energy market players and disruptors, the survey results offer confirmation that there is a huge group of consumers with zero loyalty to the incumbents, and no particular preference for who provides them with their solar and storage/remote energy management software/peer-to-peer trading platform, just so long as they can get it, asap. Getting down to the detail, the results show that 76 per cent of the Gen Y people surveyed were interested in a “connected” home energy service, while 60 per cent were likely to sign up for an app that remotely monitored and controlled their home energy use. Another 67 per cent said they were interested in an in-home system that automatically limited their electricity usage during peak periods, in return for bill credits. More than half of those surveyed, 56 per cent, said they were likely to invest in solar panels – one way or another – within the next five years. Among this group, 73 per cent expected to be able to sell the excess power their PV system produced, while 77 per cent said they would use battery storage to hold it, for self-consumption. Interestingly, however, the survey also found that a massive 67 per cent of respondents had not received information from their energy provider on distributed energy resources like solar and storage, or on products and services like automated energy control or in-home EV charging points. Another 22 per cent did not remember if they had received this information. In short, says Accenture, “the time of energy as a commodity is over. It is now about engaging the whole consumer. Consumers expect providers to care for their individual values and needs.” So what will be the major Millennial-driven energy trends in Australia? According Accenture Asia Pacific, with home ownership in Australia poised to tip to less than 50 per cent in 2017, “collective consumption” will be a trend worth watching. It notes that the products and services Millennials want, like solar and home energy management, are traditionally geared towards home owners. But given Millennials either don’t want to own their own home, or can’t afford to, utilities will need to adjust in order to meet these needs, he says. Already, more than two-thirds, or 69 per cent of those surveyed said they were interested in peer-to-peer energy trading – a service that maximises the money made from distributed energy generation by automatically deciding when to buy energy from third party providers, as well as other consumers and/or when to sell energy to third party. Of this group, 47 per cent were interested in the technology, but not willing to pay for it, while 16 per cent were interested and willing to pay for the service. This will be music to the ears of Perth start-up Power Ledger which, as we reported last week, is set to launch the first trial of its blockchain-based software program that allows distributed energy producers and consumers to trade the energy directly, saving money and hassle while maximising and democratising rooftop solar generation. “Effectively, we’re cutting out the middle-man to save consumers, and to maximise returns for producers,” Power Ledger chair and co-founder Jemma Green told One Step last week. “It’s a win for the people who have been able to afford to invest in roof-top solar, but also a win for customers who haven’t: they will be able to access clean, renewable energy at effectively a ‘wholesale’ rate. Everyone wins.” The news is also good for companies like Reposit Power and WattWatchers, the latter whose behind-the-meter energy auditor service has earned it a place on the list of semi-finalists in this year’s Australian Technologies Competition. “I strongly believe that if we give consumers access to real time data they will reduce their energy consumption significantly – either to be green or to save money,” Wattwatchers’ new managing director Gavin Dietz told RenewEconomy in an interview last month. He could be onto something…   Drive an electric car? Complete one of our short surveys for our next electric car report.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

As more than 200,000 solar households in Australia get ready to lose their premium feed-in-tariffs at the end of the year, most are wondering “what’s next” for their electricity arrangements. But the same question is being posed by big utilities, who are facing a scale and pace of disruption that could never have been anticipated. Much has been written – on this website and elsewhere – about the impact of the (still) plunging cost of solar and the arrival of battery storage. But the disruption and the opportunities being offered by those technologies is likely to be accelerated massively by the introduction of new software such as the “blockchain” system that has already taken root in financial systems. This technology holds the promise of lower bills for consumers, more localised and community-based energy, greater resilience for the entire electricity system, and huge implications for incumbent business and regulators as they struggle to keep pace. And all this as regulators and market operators, as well as the fossil fuel lobby, look to old solutions to new problems, and continue to play down the benefits and promise of these new technologies. These technologies will allow for smaller and smaller participants to transact energy in the retail and wholesale markets, through peer-to-peer rating and community-focused energy systems – such as micro-grids – and in some instances may by-pass some incumbents altogether. Two of the closest observers of the transition of the energy utility business model have been Lawrence Orsini, the principal of US-based firm LO3, which has recently set up shop in Australia, and the team at Accenture Australia, led by Ann Burns and Simon Vardy. The New York-based Orsini, who is in Australia to present at a major networks and utilities conference in Sydney this week, says the business models of utilities are being “shaken apart” by the changes in technology and the arrival of the “sharing” economy. LO3 is involved in the Brooklyn micro-grid project in New York, part of their reshaping the power vision project, and in Germany. But he says the most interest has come from Australia, and several trials are expected to be announced in coming months. The Australia interest, he says, comes as a result of the uptake of solar, the anticipated boom in battery storage, high energy costs, and the fact that the grid has not been built to be resilient. That latter comment may come as a shock to those who justified the massive spending on infrastructure in recent years on meeting the 99.998 per cent reliability standard that is designed to allow just 11 minutes of outage per customer a year. But the South Australia blackout proved a lie to that. And rather than being the fault of wind energy, as many pretended, the experience has underlined the fragility of Australia’s reliance on large centralised generators and huge networks that transport the energy hundred of even thousands of kilometres. Just about everyone agrees that the way to provide a more secure, and low cost grid, is to focus on localised energy, featuring local power and sharing – a concept that Orsini describes as “transactive energy. ” The blockchain technology is important because it can offer a “cryptographically secure”, distributed ledger that can track where electricity was generated, where it can travel to and who used it. “There is no question about where you got your kilowatt hour, where it came from and how it was produced,” he says. It is transparent and secure, and will make it easier for new and smaller players to be involved, right down to the individual solar household. In effect, another major step towards the democratisation of energy. Orsini says his company is focused on the physical transaction of energy, not the financial transactions. They key, he says, is in the need for fast acting load responses, storage, controllable generation and reaction time. “So what we need is a transitive grid,” Orsini tells RenewEconomy in an interview. “We are going to hit a tipping point where this is going to shift very fast. “Any energy system that is running high on renewables, in combination with non renewables and storage, needs to move to market model that recognizes the value of a “negawatt” (the power you don’t use) as well as the value of megawatt. The grid architecture will change very quickly.” Orsini says the Brooklyn project has already provided some valuable lessons, in particularly the interest from consumers in where the their electric came from. “I was skeptical that people would have an interest in where energy coming from, but Brooklyn shook that up a bit. I didn’t understand how much of  a driver was renewable energy, for solar on the rooftop, for community projects, and for their environmental benefits. In Brooklyn they want their electrons to be Brooklyn electrons.” He says one of the biggest drivers in Australia will be location-based models for energy production, transportation and consumption. “If you are buying your electricity from far away – and if you not paying for that cost, then it is socialised. You never see the real cost. As soon as you start paying for the real cost then the grid re-organises itself. You will want to pay for stuff that is closer. We used to have no choice but to have a centralised, monopoly grid, but we didn’t need to do that any more.” Orsini pointed to research by consultancy firm Accenture that suggested that 80 per cent of consumers wanted to “participate” in the market, not as active traders perhaps but certainly not as passive as they had been. “I still don’t know that that computes with me,” Orsini admitted. RenewEconomy recently interviewed Accenture energy experts Ann Burns and Simon Vardy, who are in no doubt that the shift in attitude of consumers – enabled by solar and storage – and the role that blockchain will play in that. “The consumer will drive the agenda more and more,” says Burns. Sharing and community focused energy is “not something that can be prevented.” Vardy says that blockchain has the capacity to “cut out the middle men” which may include retailers and generators, and the uptake will be driven by the changing consumer landscape and the emergence of the “millennial” as the largest consumer cohort – a position they will reach by 2020. Buy a cool T-shirt or mug in the CleanTechnica store!   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

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