Acadian Seaplants Ltd

Dartmouth, Canada

Acadian Seaplants Ltd

Dartmouth, Canada
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Ugarte R.,Acadian Seaplants Ltd | Sharp G.,Kiely Cove Marine Enterprises
Journal of Applied Phycology | Year: 2012

Commercial exploitation of Ascophyllum nodosum (rockweed) along the coast of Nova Scotia began in the late 1950s when it was used as a raw material for manufacturing alginate and "kelp" meal. Today, this resource is used as a biostimulant extract for crops and animal feed supplements and is the main economic resource of the seaweed industry in the Maritime Provinces and Canada. The management of rockweed, by dividing the resource into many sectors, permitted the assessment of yield per unit area of bed. In Nova Scotia, mechanical harvesting of A. nodosum operated on a pulse of 2- to 3-year schedule providing yields of 21.9 to 47.7 wet t ha -1 averaging 35.3 ± 7.6 wet t ha -1. Acadian Seaplants Limited (ASL) has become the dominant player in the region since 1995 with more than 75% of the total biomass under its leases and more than 90% of the total landing of rockweed in the last 13 years. Sustained harvests at ASL leases and under an annual harvest schedule using hand cutting methods have averaged 17.4 ± 2.6 t ha -1. Exploitation rates above 35% of the harvestable crop lead to a pulse harvest strategy and the need to move infrastructure year after year. In New Brunswick, a new approach to management began in 1995 with a regulated 17% exploitation rate. Thus, the yield in that province is 14.3 wet t ha -1. The current summer standing crop for this region has been calculated at 352,723 wet t, covering an area of 4,960 ha, with an average biomass of 71.3 t ha -1. The harvest in the region reached peak landings in 2010 with just over 40,100 t. The consistent yield per hectare of A. nodosum beds is proof of good management practices and an ecologically sustainable harvest in the Canadian Maritimes. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Craigie J.S.,Acadian Seaplants Ltd
Journal of Applied Phycology | Year: 2011

Both micro- and macroalgae have long been used to augment plant productivity and food production in various regions of the world through their beneficial effects when applied to soils. Interactions of algae with the soil community undoubtedly are complex and benefits are dependent on the crop and the local environmental conditions. This has resulted in much speculation as to mechanisms involved as well as the validity of the results reported. It is now 60 years since the first commercial seaweed extract was manufactured for agricultural use. These aqueous extracts allowed for the first time the direct application of soluble seaweed constituents to specific plant organs such as leaves and roots. The earlier concept that benefits of seaweeds and their extracts were due mainly to their manurial value or to their micronutrient suites is no longer tenable. Seaweeds likewise have been used for millennia as fodder supplements to improve animal nutrition and productivity. Recent research is focusing on their mode of action, specific health benefits, and the mechanisms of action in animals. Improved analytical techniques and instrumentation coupled with the use of molecular genetic tools are establishing that seaweed extracts can modify plant and animal responses at a fundamental level. It therefore seems appropriate to review key developments over the years and to remark on novel findings. A new and exciting vista has opened for seaweed extracts in both plant and animal applications. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Ascophyllum nodosum (rockweed) landings in the Atlantic Maritime provinces of Canada totalled 36,500 wet tonnes in 2009. Due to the relative slow growth, stochastic recruitment, and the importance of habitat protection, strict harvest regulations are in place in the region to maintain the integrity of this resource. Special harvesting rakes have been designed to cut the plants and not to dislodge the clumps and their holdfasts from the substratum. However, for various reasons, close to 6% of the biomass harvested annually contains holdfast material. This proportion is closely monitored by the province as it is assumed to represent clump mortality. However, due to the complex structure of A. nodosum clumps, this relationship with mortality is not simple. A study was carried out to evaluate the real impact of this detachment on the A. nodosum population of southern New Brunswick in 2004. The structure of harvested A. nodosum clumps with associated holdfast material was analyzed and compared to non-harvested clumps from the same harvest area. Results showed that when a rake strips a clump, it only detaches 17.4% of the holdfast surface, leaving 36.8% of the plant biomass and 80.3% of the shoot density intact. An analysis of storm-cast material from the same study area showed a similar effect in the clump structure, although the incidence of holdfast in the detached biomass could be as high as 30%. Due to the high biomass detached each year by coastal storms in New Brunswick, their impact on the A. nodosum resource is 21 times higher than the annual harvest. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Trademark
ACADIAN SEAPLANTS Ltd | Date: 2016-08-11

Alginates for the food industry; Antioxidants for use in the manufacture of cosmetics; Antioxidants for use in the manufacture of food supplements; Antioxidants for use in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals; Antioxidants for use in the manufacture of food, drink, and neutraceuticals for humans and animals in the nature of seaweed additives; Protein for use in the manufacture of cosmetics; Proteins for use in the manufacture of food supplements; Proteins for use in the manufacture of food, drink, and neutraceuticals for humans and animals in the nature of seaweed additives; Plant and herb extracts for use in the manufacture of cosmetics. Unprocessed seaweed (Wakame); Unprocessed kelp (Kombu seaweed).


Trademark
Acadian Seaplants Ltd | Date: 2017-01-24

Fertilizers; Manure; Plant growth nutrients for agricultural use; Plant growth regulators for agricultural use; Seaweed extract for use as a growth stimulant on plants.


Trademark
ACADIAN SEAPLANTS Ltd | Date: 2016-12-10

Enzymes for the brewing industry; Plant extracts, namely, seaweed, used in the manufacture of clarifiers for brewing purposes.


Trademark
ACADIAN SEAPLANTS Ltd | Date: 2016-08-22

Fertilizers for agricultural use; Plant growth regulators for agricultural use; Plant growth nutrients for agricultural use; Seaweed extract for use as a growth stimulant on plants; Soil conditioning preparations comprised of biostimulants for agricultural use.


Trademark
ACADIAN SEAPLANTS Ltd | Date: 2016-08-22

Fertilizers for agricultural use; Plant growth regulators for agricultural use; Plant growth nutrients for agricultural use; Seaweed extract for use as a growth stimulant on plants; Soil conditioning preparations comprised of biostimulants for agricultural use.


Trademark
ACADIAN SEAPLANTS Ltd | Date: 2016-09-29

Fertilizers for agricultural use; Plant growth regulators for agricultural use; Plant growth nutrients for agricultural use; Seaweed extract for use as a growth stimulant on plants; Soil conditioning preparations comprised of biostimulants for agricultural use.


Trademark
ACADIAN SEAPLANTS Ltd | Date: 2016-08-03

Alginates for the food industry; Antioxidants for use in the manufacture of cosmetics; Antioxidants for use in the manufacture of food supplements; Antioxidants for use in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals; Antioxidants for use in the manufacture of food, drink, and neutraceuticals for humans and animals in the nature of seaweed additives; Protein for use in the manufacture of cosmetics; Proteins for use in the manufacture of food supplements; Proteins for use in the manufacture of food, drink, and neutraceuticals for humans and animals in the nature of seaweed additives; Plant and herb extracts for use in the manufacture of cosmetics. Unprocessed seaweed (Wakame); Unprocessed kelp (Kombu seaweed).

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