The Academy of Cosmetics and Health Care

Warsaw, Poland

The Academy of Cosmetics and Health Care

Warsaw, Poland
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Herman A.,The Academy of Cosmetics and Health Care | Herman A.P.,Polish Academy of Sciences
Archives of Dermatological Research | Year: 2017

Currently available conventional therapies of hair loss using synthetic drugs are still imperfect and have a number of limitations. Their effectiveness as well as the safety of their use is often questioned. It has led to an increased interest in alternative treatments with fewer side-effects such as formulations containing herbs and/or their active constituents. For this purpose several electronic databases and hand-searched references were used to summarize current knowledge regarding topically used herbal products for the treatment of hair loss acquired on the basis of preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, mechanism of their action, follicular penetration and possible adverse effect of herbal products will be also described. © 2017 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany


Herman A.P.,Polish Academy of Sciences | Herman A.,The Academy of Cosmetics and Health Care | Skipor J.,Polish Academy of Sciences | Krawczynska A.,Polish Academy of Sciences | And 2 more authors.
Reproductive Biology | Year: 2015

The study was designed to determine the effects of caffeine on luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion and gene expression of caffeine-associated receptors in anterior pituitary (AP) explants obtained from saline- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated ewes. Animals had been treated with LPS or saline daily for seven days. Three hours after the last injection of LPS/saline, the AP were collected and divided into four explants. The explants were incubated with: 1/medium-199 (control explants), 2/gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; 100. pmol/mL; a positive control), 3/caffeine (10. mmol/L), or 4/GnRH. +. caffeine. Caffeine stimulated (. p<. 0.05) LH release by explants from both saline (19.7 vs. control 12.6. ng/mg) and LPS (28.3 vs. control 13.9. ng/mg) treated animals. The effect of caffeine on LH secretion was stronger in the LPS-treated group than in saline-treated group, and the observed LH release was similar to that induced by GnRH alone (27.2. ng/mg). Caffeine increased (. p<. 0.05) LHβ gene expression only in explants from LPS-treated animals. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated a stimulatory in vitro effect of caffeine on LH secretion by ovine pituitary explants. The potency of the caffeine-induced LH secretion was affected by in vivo treatment of the animals with endotoxin. © 2014 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn.


Herman A.,The Academy of Cosmetics and Health Care | Herman A.P.,Polish Academy of Sciences
Fitoterapia | Year: 2016

This article discusses the mechanisms via topically applied products containing herbs and their active constituents affect the hair growth process. It was reported that the mechanisms involving (1) insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), (2) vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), (3) epidermal growth factor (EGF), (4) fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), (5) endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), (6) Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway, (7) prostaglandin E (PGE), (8) prostaglandin F (PGF) stimulate hair growth, whereas the mechanisms engaging (1) 5α-reductase and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), (2) transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), (3) fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF-5), (4) prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) inhibit hair growth. The knowledge summarized in the paper may be an inspiration to create new preparations for the treatment of hair loss. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


Herman A.,The Academy of Cosmetics and Health Care | Herman A.P.,Polish Academy of Sciences
Planta Medica | Year: 2016

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized histologically by hyperproliferation and aberrant differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes. A wide range of conventional medical therapies to treat psoriasis is established, from topical therapies and systemic medications through to phototherapy or combinations of those. However, most of these therapies have a limited efficacy and may cause a number of side effects, including cutaneous atrophy, organ toxicity, carcinogenicity, and broadband immunosuppression, which are restricting their long-term use. Therefore, it would be desirable to use herbal products as an alternative treatment for psoriasis that causes fewer side effects. For this purpose, several electronic databases and literature references were used to summarize the current knowledge acquired on the basis of animal studies and clinical trials regarding herbal products used to treat psoriasis topically. This review discusses the mechanisms of herbal products activities through (1) inhibition of the keratinocyte hyperproliferation and inducing apoptosis, (2) inhibition of immune-inflammatory reaction, (3) suppression of phosphorylase kinase (PhK) activity, and (4) inhibition of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Moreover, the penetration of herbal products through the psoriatic skin barrier, novel herbal drug delivery systems in psoriasis treatment, and possible adverse effects of herbal therapy are discussed. Copyright © 2016, Georg Thieme Verlag KG. All rights reserved.


PubMed | The Academy of Cosmetics and Health Care and Polish Academy of Sciences
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Planta medica | Year: 2016

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized histologically by hyperproliferation and aberrant differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes. A wide range of conventional medical therapies to treat psoriasis is established, from topical therapies and systemic medications through to phototherapy or combinations of those. However, most of these therapies have a limited efficacy and may cause a number of side effects, including cutaneous atrophy, organ toxicity, carcinogenicity, and broadband immunosuppression, which are restricting their long-term use. Therefore, it would be desirable to use herbal products as an alternative treatment for psoriasis that causes fewer side effects. For this purpose, several electronic databases and literature references were used to summarize the current knowledge acquired on the basis of animal studies and clinical trials regarding herbal products used to treat psoriasis topically. This review discusses the mechanisms of herbal products activities through (1) inhibition of the keratinocyte hyperproliferation and inducing apoptosis, (2) inhibition of immune-inflammatory reaction, (3) suppression of phosphorylase kinase (PhK) activity, and (4) inhibition of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Moreover, the penetration of herbal products through the psoriatic skin barrier, novel herbal drug delivery systems in psoriasis treatment, and possible adverse effects of herbal therapy are discussed.


PubMed | The Academy of Cosmetics and Health Care and Polish Academy of Sciences
Type: | Journal: Mediators of inflammation | Year: 2016

In vertebrates, numerous processes occur in a rhythmic manner. The hormonal signal reliably reflecting the environmental light conditions is melatonin. Nocturnal melatonin secretion patterns could be disturbed in pathophysiological states, including inflammation, Alzheimers disease, and depression. All of these states share common elements in their aetiology, including the overexpression of interleukin- (IL-) 1 in the central nervous system. Therefore, the present study was designed to determine the effect of the central injection of exogenous IL-1 on melatonin release and on the expression of the enzymes of the melatonin biosynthetic pathway in the pineal gland of ewe. It was found that intracerebroventricular injections of IL-1 (50g/animal) suppressed (P < 0.05) nocturnal melatonin secretion in sheep regardless of the photoperiod. This may have resulted from decreased (P < 0.05) synthesis of the melatonin intermediate serotonin, which may have resulted, at least partially, from a reduced expression of tryptophan hydroxylase. IL-1 also inhibited (P < 0.05) the expression of the melatonin rhythm enzyme arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase. However, the ability of IL-1 to affect the expression of these enzymes was dependent upon the photoperiod. Our study may shed new light on the role of central IL-1 in the aetiology of disruptions in melatonin secretion.


PubMed | The Academy of Cosmetics and Health Care and Polish Academy of Sciences
Type: | Journal: BioMed research international | Year: 2014

The study was designed to determine the effects of peripheral injection of SB203580 on the synthesis of interleukin- (IL-) 1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in the hypothalamus of ewes during prolonged inflammation. Inflammation was induced by the administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (400 ng/kg) over 7 days. SB203580 is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is involved in the regulation of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF synthesis. Intravenous injection of SB203580 successfully inhibited (P < 0.01) synthesis of IL-1 and reduced (P < 0.01) the production of IL-6 in the hypothalamus. The p38 MAPK inhibitor decreased (P < 0.01) gene expression of TNF but its effect was not observed at the level of TNF protein synthesis. SB203580 also reduced (P < 0.01) LPS-stimulated IL-1 receptor type 1 gene expression. The conclusion that inhibition of p38 MAPK blocks LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine synthesis seems to initiate new perspectives in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases also within the central nervous system. However, potential proinflammatory effects of SB203580 treatment suggest that all therapies using p38 MAPK inhibitors should be introduced very carefully with analysis of all expected and unexpected consequences of treatment.


PubMed | The Academy of Cosmetics and Health Care and Polish Academy of Sciences
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Reproductive biology | Year: 2015

The study was designed to determine the effects of caffeine on luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion and gene expression of caffeine-associated receptors in anterior pituitary (AP) explants obtained from saline- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated ewes. Animals had been treated with LPS or saline daily for seven days. Three hours after the last injection of LPS/saline, the AP were collected and divided into four explants. The explants were incubated with: 1/medium-199 (control explants), 2/gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; 100 pmol/mL; a positive control), 3/caffeine (10 mmol/L), or 4/GnRH+caffeine. Caffeine stimulated (p<0.05) LH release by explants from both saline (19.7 vs. control 12.6 ng/mg) and LPS (28.3 vs. control 13.9 ng/mg) treated animals. The effect of caffeine on LH secretion was stronger in the LPS-treated group than in saline-treated group, and the observed LH release was similar to that induced by GnRH alone (27.2 ng/mg). Caffeine increased (p<0.05) LH gene expression only in explants from LPS-treated animals. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated a stimulatory in vitro effect of caffeine on LH secretion by ovine pituitary explants. The potency of the caffeine-induced LH secretion was affected by in vivo treatment of the animals with endotoxin.


PubMed | The Academy of Cosmetics and Health Care and Polish Academy of Sciences
Type: | Journal: Fitoterapia | Year: 2016

This article discusses the mechanisms via topically applied products containing herbs and their active constituents affect the hair growth process. It was reported that the mechanisms involving (1) insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), (2) vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), (3) epidermal growth factor (EGF), (4) fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), (5) endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), (6) Wnt/-catenin signalling pathway, (7) prostaglandin E (PGE), (8) prostaglandin F (PGF) stimulate hair growth, whereas the mechanisms engaging (1) 5-reductase and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), (2) transforming growth factor beta (TGF-), (3) fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF-5), (4) prostaglandin D

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