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CHICAGO, Feb. 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- InvestorsObserver issues critical PriceWatch Alerts for ABX, CF, MDLZ, NTAP, and X. To see the high-return covered-call trades uncovered by InvestorsObserver's analysts, read the InvestorsObserver's PriceWatch Alert by selecting the corresponding...


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Attendees to MED|Ed Facilities® 2017 can attend new educational sessions produced and sponsored by the Facility Guidelines Institute (FGI), April 4+5,2017, at the Seaport World Trade Center Boston. The Facility Guidelines Institute’s sessions at MED|Ed Facilities® will focus on revisions coming to the 2018 FGI Guidelines for Design and Construction. The 2018 Guidelines revision cycle will yield three Guidelines documents—one for hospitals, one for outpatient facilities, and one for residential health, care, and support facilities. Complete descriptions and additional sessions are available at http://www.mededboston.com. MED/Ed’s exhibit area will provide opportunities for product manufacturers to display products to the design and construction professionals who attend the event. Douglas S. Erickson, FASHE, CHFM, HFDP, CHC, CEO of the Facility Guidelines Institute, states, “FGI partners with numerous other organizations to develop the Guidelines and other practical, evidence-informed publications. We’re excited about the opportunity to be an educational collaborator with MED|ED and to share with the attendees the latest thinking of FGI’s Health Guidelines Revision Committee. This 100+ person committee of heath care experts is putting the final touches on the 2018 series of Guidelines and will be addressing the major changes and the philosophy behind them at this conference. The 2018 publications will be issued in late November 2017 and will be adopted by states such as Massachusetts and New Jersey in 2018.” Richard Vendola, MED|Ed Facilities Boston Principal notes, “To support our goal of delivering the highest quality educational programs for the design and construction professionals in the Northeast, we partnered with the premier experts on subject matter, and FGI is exactly that when it comes to standards for health care facilities. We are happy to be able to draw on FGI’s knowledge and experience.” About the Facility Guidelines Institute Founded in 1998, the Facility Guidelines Institute is a not-for-profit corporation founded to provide leadership and continuity to the Guidelines revision process. FGI functions as the coordinating entity for development of the Guidelines series of documents using a multidisciplinary, consensus-based process and for provision of ancillary services that encourage and improve their application and use. FGI invests revenue derived from sales of the Guidelines to fund research and the activities of the next revision cycle. About the FGI Guidelines for Design and Construction Documents The FGI Guidelines for Design and Construction documents are updated every four years to keep pace with new concepts, capabilities, and technologies in the delivery of health care. The Guidelines documents are used by states to regulate health care facility design and construction, through adoption of the Guidelines as code, as a basis for state-written codes, as an adjunct to state codes, or for reference. About MED|Ed Facilities® MED|Ed Facilities is produced in collaboration with Tradeshow Management Services Ltd. (TMS), a full-service tradeshow company specializing in conferences and tradeshows for the design, building and construction marketplace. TMS has been affiliated with leading events including AEC SYSTEMS, ArchitectureBoston Expo (ABX), Build Boston, Residential Design & Construction, Ecobuild America, Federal Construction Outlook Conference, BIM Expo, and Construction Technology. The event is held in cooperation with the Construction Specifications Institute Boston, USGBC-MA, FGI and Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD) # # #


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

All amounts expressed in U.S. dollars Barrick Gold Corporation (NYSE:ABX)(TSX:ABX) ("Barrick" or the "Company") reported annual results that exceeded the Company's key targets for the year. In 2016, our mines generated operating cash flow of $2.64 billion, and free cash flow2 of $1.51 billion – a record level of annual free cash flow for the Company. We reduced our cost of sales applicable to gold to $798 per ounce, and our all-in sustaining costs3 fell by 12 percent, to $730 per ounce. We continued to strengthen our balance sheet, cutting our total debt by $2.04 billion, or 20 percent. And we brought greater discipline and rigor to our capital allocation process with the appointment of the Company's first-ever Chief Investment Officer. Our vision is the generation of wealth through responsible mining – wealth for our owners, our people, and the countries and communities with which we partner. In support of this vision, our overarching objective is to grow our free cash flow per share. We are cultivating a high-performance culture defined by the following principles: a deep commitment to partnership, consistent execution, operational excellence, disciplined capital allocation, and continual self-improvement. We are obsessed with talent, and seek out fresh perspectives from other industries, challenging ourselves to think differently as we aim to transform Barrick into a leading 21st century company. We will grow free cash flow per share over the long term by: maintaining and growing industry-leading margins, increasingly driven by innovation and our digital transformation; by managing our portfolio and allocating capital with discipline and rigor; and by leveraging our distinctive partnership culture as a competitive advantage. Our prospects for growing free cash flow per share build on a foundation of core mines that are among the longest-life, lowest-cost gold operations in the world. We have the largest gold reserves and resources in the industry5, including a deep pipeline of projects that provide extraordinary optionality and leverage to gold prices. Our exploration programs have a demonstrated track record of value creation. And we are evaluating acquisitions and partnerships with the potential to improve the overall quality of our portfolio over the long term. Through our Best-in-Class approach, we pursue industry-leading margins by continuously improving the productivity and efficiency of existing systems and operations. Equally, we pursue step changes in performance by re-designing those systems and introducing new technologies; and we innovate to redefine what is possible. As one example, we are pursuing step changes in performance in Nevada by fully integrating the Cortez and Goldstrike operations. Over the past two years, these mines have benefited from increasing collaboration, including joint metal planning to optimize ore processing. By fully integrating the management of their assets, infrastructure, and expertise, we expect to further accelerate improvements in efficiency and productivity. For example, we will fully integrate processing operations and create an integrated digital operations management center that will serve both mines – all under a single, site-based leadership structure. We will also develop an integrated strategic plan for the combined operation that optimizes site resources and capital spending to maximize long-term value creation. Our digital transformation will be another Best-in-Class priority for 2017. Since announcing our partnership with Cisco in September, we have completed proofs of concept for digital projects at Cortez, our pilot digital operation, and we are now implementing them in the field. This work is supported from our digital innovation center in Elko, Nevada, where frontline operators are working with software programmers and other external partners to develop customized digital solutions. The integration of Cortez and Goldstrike will also allow us to further accelerate the implementation and impact of digital transformation in Nevada. As we continue to demonstrate value in the field, we intend to expand digital solutions to other Barrick operations, starting at Veladero, with a focus on digital environmental management systems. We will provide further updates on digital projects during our Operations and Technical Update on February 22. While today's digital technologies are already helping to improve the productivity and efficiency of our operations, in 2017 we will develop a long-term innovation strategy to redefine what is possible in mining, including an innovation road map for the Company. In 2016, we continued to strengthen our investment review and capital allocation process with the appointment of Mark Hill as the Company's first Chief Investment Officer. Mr. Hill was Head of Mining and led the Evaluations group at Waterton Global Resource Management, a private investment firm with an outstanding track record of capital allocation – expertise he combines with earlier experience at Barrick. The Chief Investment Officer is responsible for ensuring that a high degree of consistency and rigor is applied to all capital allocation decisions at the Company – whether at existing operations, development projects, exploration (both near-mine and greenfields), or potential acquisitions and divestments. As part of our revamped capital allocation system, all proposals go through a rigorous, independent peer review process led by our Evaluations team, before they go to the Investment Committee. They are then ranked, prioritized, and sequenced to optimize capital spending over time on a strategic basis, allowing us to anticipate and plan for funding requirements. We expect our portfolio to deliver a 10-15 percent return on invested capital through metal price cycles and, as such, all new capital spending is measured against a hurdle rate of 15 percent based on the Company's long-term gold price assumption of $1,200 per ounce. Over time, assets that are unable to meet our return expectations will be divested. We are also continuously evaluating external opportunities to increase the long-term value of our portfolio through acquisitions, joint ventures, and other partnerships. We believe an authentic partnership culture is our most distinctive and sustainable competitive advantage. For Barrick, partnership means a trust-based culture, and the currency of trust is transparency. It is a culture of peers. Those who are part of Barrick recognize that in general, the collective is stronger than the aggregation of individuals. By embracing these values, we aim to be the preferred partner of host governments and communities, the most sought-after employer among the world's best talent, and the natural choice for long-term investors. Last year, we created a program to make every Barrick employee – from the rock face to the head office – an owner of the Company, with an initial allocation of 25 common shares per person. We expect this to grow over time, in line with Barrick's performance. Our goal is not simply to be aligned with our owners, we want our people to be owners. We also created a new partnership with Cisco to drive Barrick's digital transformation. Working with Cisco and other technology partners, we have begun to develop our flagship digital operation at the Cortez mine in Nevada – embedding digital technology in every dimension of the mine to deliver better, faster, and safer mining. This transformation will improve not only productivity and efficiency, but also environmental and safety performance – which will allow Barrick to build and maintain greater trust with communities, governments, NGOs, and other partners. We continue to strengthen our relationships with other external partners, including Zijin Mining, Ma'aden, and Antofagasta Plc – our joint venture partners at the Porgera, Jabal Sayid, and Zaldívar mines. And we are working to develop new partnerships with the potential to unlock value across our business, and grow free cash flow per share over the long term. In 2017, we expect to produce 5.60-5.90 million ounces of gold, at a cost of sales applicable to gold of $780-$820 per ounce, and all-in sustaining costs3 of $720-$770 per ounce. This represents an improvement over our previous 2017 guidance of 5.0-5.5 million ounces of gold, at all-in sustaining costs3 of $740-$790 per ounce. As we did last year, our intention is to improve upon our plans as we advance our digital transformation, and other Best-in-Class initiatives. For 2017, we are once again targeting a free cash flow breakeven gold price of $1,000 per ounce, which should ensure that we can generate cash in periods of lower gold prices, while generating a windfall when gold prices rise. For 2018, we expect to produce 4.80-5.30 million ounces of gold, at a cost of sales applicable to gold of $790-$840 per ounce, and all-in sustaining costs3 of $710-$770 per ounce. In 2019, we expect to produce 4.60-5.10 million ounces of gold, at a cost of sales applicable to gold of $800-$870 per ounce, and all-in sustaining costs3 of $700-$770 per ounce. Based on our current asset mix and subject to potential divestments, we expect to maintain annual production of at least 4.5 million ounces of gold through 2021. Please see page 11 for detailed operating and capital expenditure guidance. The table found in the appendix at the end of this press release outlines the material assumptions used to develop the forward-looking statements in our outlook and guidance, and provides an economic sensitivity analysis of those assumptions. For certain related risk factors, please see the cautionary statement on forward-looking information at the end of this press release. Full-year net earnings were $655 million ($0.56 per share), compared to a net loss of $2.84 billion ($2.44 per share) in 2015. In 2016, adjusted net earnings1 were $818 million ($0.70 per share), compared to $344 million ($0.30 per share) in 2015. This significant improvement in earnings was largely due to $3.9 billion of impairment charges recorded in 2015, compared to net impairment reversals of $250 million recorded in 2016. Higher earnings were also driven by higher gold and copper prices, combined with higher sales volumes (excluding the impact of divested sites), lower operating costs, and lower expenses for exploration, evaluation, and projects. After adjusting for items that are not indicative of future operating earnings, adjusted net earnings1 of $818 million in 2016 were 138 percent higher than in 2015. This improvement was primarily due to higher gold and copper prices, higher gold and copper sales volumes (excluding the impact of divested sites), and lower operating costs. Significant adjusting items to net earnings (pre-tax and non-controlling interest effects) in 2016 include: Full-year revenues were $8.56 billion, compared to $9.03 billion in 2015. Operating cash flow in 2016 was $2.64 billion, compared to $2.79 billion in 2015. Free cash flow2 for 2016 was $1.51 billion, compared to $471 million6 in 2015. Excluding the proceeds of the Pueblo Viejo streaming transaction in 2015, operating cash flow for 2016 was $456 million higher than the prior year, despite a $355 million reduction in operating cash flow associated with the divestment of non-core assets. Strong operating cash flow was driven by higher gold prices and lower direct mining costs, as a result of lower energy and fuel costs (despite being hedged on a significant portion of our fuel consumption), combined with lower labor, consumable, and contractor costs, and improved operating efficiencies driven by Best-in-Class initiatives, as well as lower cash interest paid. Fourth quarter net earnings were $425 million ($0.36 per share), compared to a net loss of $2.62 billion ($2.25 per share) in the prior-year period. Adjusted net earnings1 for the fourth quarter were $255 million ($0.22 per share), compared to $91 million ($0.08 per share) in the prior-year period. Net earnings in the fourth quarter reflect an increase in realized gold and copper prices, and lower cost of sales, in addition to $146 million (net of tax effects and non-controlling interests) in net impairment reversals, compared to impairment charges of $2.6 billion (net of tax effects and non-controlling interests) recorded in the fourth quarter of 2015. Fourth quarter revenues were $2.32 billion, compared to $2.24 billion in the prior-year period. Operating cash flow in the fourth quarter was $711 million, compared to $698 million in the fourth quarter of 2015. Free cash flow2 for the fourth quarter was $385 million, compared to $387 million in the prior year period. Achieving and maintaining a strong balance sheet remains a top priority. In 2016, we reduced our total debt by $2.04 billion, or 20 percent, slightly exceeding our $2 billion target for the year. At the end of the fourth quarter, Barrick had a consolidated cash balance of approximately $2.4 billion.7 Barrick has less than $200 million in debt due before 2019.8 About $5 billion, or 63 percent of our outstanding total debt of $7.9 billion, does not mature until after 2032. We intend to reduce our total debt by $2.9 billion, to $5 billion, by the end of 2018 – half of which we are targeting in 2017. We will achieve this by using cash flow from operations, selling additional non-core assets, and creating new joint ventures and partnerships. Barrick's operations delivered progressively-stronger performance over the course of 2016, with three consecutive quarters of improved all-in sustaining cost guidance and gold production at the high end of our annual production forecast. These results reflect our ongoing focus on capital discipline, and Best-in-Class improvements that are driving greater productivity and efficiency. We also improved our safety performance, achieving a total reportable injury frequency rate (TRIFR)9 of 0.40 – the best result in the Company's history. Since 2009, we have reduced our TRIFR by 67 percent. Despite these improvements, Meckson Makompe, an employee at our Lumwana mine, lost his life in a workplace accident last year. Subsequently, Williams Garrido, a contractor working at the Pascua-Lama project, was involved in a fatal accident this month. Every person at Barrick must go home safe and healthy every single day, and we will never be satisfied with our performance until we achieve this paramount goal. In 2016, our mines produced 5.52 million ounces of gold, at a cost of sales applicable to gold of $798 per ounce. All-in sustaining costs3 were $730 per ounce, a reduction of 12 percent compared to 2015. We also reduced our cash costs3 by eight percent, from $596 per ounce in 2015, to $546 per ounce in 2016. Gold production in the fourth quarter was 1.52 million ounces, at a cost of sales applicable to gold of $784 per ounce, and all-in sustaining costs3 of $732 per ounce, compared to 1.62 million ounces at a cost of sales of $848 per ounce, and all-in sustaining costs3 of $733 per ounce in the prior-year period. Copper production in 2016 was 415 million pounds, at a cost of sales attribute to copper of $1.43 per pound, and all-in sustaining costs10 of $2.05 per pound, in line with our guidance for the year. This compares to 511 million pounds, at a cost of sales attributable to copper of $1.65 per pound, and all-in sustaining costs10 of $2.33 per pound in 2015. The Jabal Sayid project, a 50-50 joint venture with Saudi Arabian Mining Company (Ma'aden), commenced commercial production on July 1, 2016. Barrick's 50 percent share of production in 2017 is expected to be 30-40 million pounds. In 2016, capital expenditures on a cash basis were $1.12 billion, compared to $1.71 billion in 2015. A decrease of $327 million, excluding the impact of $260 million in capital expenditures associated with divested sites, was primarily due to lower capitalized stripping costs at Veladero, a decrease in leach pad expansion costs at Veladero and Lagunas Norte, and our ongoing focus on capital discipline across the Company. Lower capital costs also reflected lower project spending compared to 2015, mainly relating to the completion of the thiosulfate leaching circuit at Goldstrike, and decreased capital expenditures at Pascua-Lama. Barrick manages the industry's largest inventory of gold reserves and resources5, with a strong track record of adding reserves and resources at our operations and projects through exploration. The Company's five core mines, which are expected to account for approximately 70 percent of our production in 2017, have an average reserve grade of 1.84 grams per tonne – more than double that of our peer group average.5 The majority of our reserves and resources are situated in regions where we have proven operating experience, a critical mass of infrastructure, technical and exploration expertise, and established partnerships with suppliers, host governments, and communities. To calculate our 2016 reserves, we have applied a short-term gold price assumption of $1,000 per ounce for the next four years, and a long-term gold price of $1,200 per ounce from 2021 onwards, consistent with our approach in 2015. As of December 31, 2016, Barrick's proven and probable gold reserves were 85.9 million ounces4, compared to 91.9 million ounces at the end of 2015. Approximately 1.9 million ounces were divested last year, and 6.8 million ounces were depleted through mining and processing. We replaced approximately 60 percent of the ounces we depleted through drilling and cost improvements at our operating mines. Significant additions included 1.1 million ounces at Lagunas Norte, 920,000 ounces at Hemlo, and 640,000 ounces at the Goldstrike underground mine. Reserves at Pascua-Lama declined by 1.3 million ounces as a result of design modifications to enhance safety and environmental mitigation at the project. Reserves at Acacia's Bulyanhulu mine also declined by 430,000 ounces. In 2016, measured, indicated, and inferred resources were calculated using a gold price assumption of $1,500 per ounce. This compares to $1,300 per ounce in 2015. Measured and indicated gold resources decreased to 75.2 million ounces4 at the end of 2016, compared to 79.1 million ounces at the end of 2015. Approximately 4.3 million ounces of measured and indicated gold resources were divested in 2016, and 2.7 million ounces were upgraded to proven and probable gold reserves. Approximately 5.3 million ounces were added to measured and indicated resources as a result of using a $1,500 per ounce gold price assumption. Inferred gold resources increased to 30.7 million ounces4 at the end of 2016, compared to 27.4 million ounces at the end of 2015. Approximately 3.2 million ounces were upgraded to measured and indicated resources. Approximately 5.3 million ounces were added through drilling, including 2.0 million ounces at Veladero, 1.3 million ounces at Hemlo and 1.1 million ounces at Alturas. Approximately 1.7 million ounces were added to inferred resources as a result of using a $1,500 per ounce gold price assumption. The addition of 5.3 million ounces of inferred gold resources through drilling underscores the value of our investments in near-mine exploration, and sets the stage for replenishing and upgrading our reserve and resource portfolio in future years. Proven and probable copper reserves were calculated using a short-term copper price of $2.25 per pound, and a long-term price of $2.75 per pound. This compares to a short-term copper price of $2.75 per pound, and a long-term price of $3.00 per pound, in 2015. Copper reserves, including copper within gold reserves, were 11.1 billion pounds4 at the end of 2016, compared to 11.7 billion pounds, at the end of 2015. Measured and indicated copper resources, including copper within measured and indicated gold resources, increased slightly to 9.7 billion pounds4, compared to 9.6 billion pounds, at the end of 2016. Barrick has the largest gold reserves and resources in the industry5, including some of the largest undeveloped gold projects in the world, which gives us significant optionality and leverage to gold prices. We have a demonstrated track record of creating value through exploration. Since 1990, we have found 143 million ounces of gold for an overall discovery cost of $25 per ounce, or roughly half the average finding cost across the industry. After several years of exploration focused primarily on existing core districts and projects, we are increasing our budget and broadening our focus to include new greenfield opportunities. Approximately 80 percent of our total exploration budget of $185-$225 million is allocated to the Americas. The majority of the remaining budget is allocated to Acacia. Our exploration programs balance high-quality brownfield projects, greenfield exploration, and emerging discoveries that have the potential to become profitable mines. In the short term, every one of our operating mines has the potential to identify new reserves and resources through near-mine exploration (MINEX). In many cases, these ounces can be quickly incorporated into mine plans, driving improvements in production, cash flow, and earnings. Over the medium term, we are advancing a pipeline of high-confidence projects at or near our existing operations. These projects remain on track, with the potential to begin contributing new production to our portfolio beginning in 2021. This includes three significant projects in Nevada: the Cortez Deep South underground expansion; the potential development of an underground mine at Goldrush; and a significant expansion of throughput at the Turquoise Ridge mine. At the Lagunas Norte mine in Peru, we are advancing a project to extend the life of the mine by mining the refractory material below the oxide ore body in the current open pit. At the Alturas project in Chile, we have added an additional 1.1 million ounces of inferred gold resources, bringing the total inferred resource to 6.8 million ounces.4 We expect to complete a scoping study for Alturas in 2017. We have also initiated a prefeasibility study to evaluate the construction of an underground mine at Lama, on the Argentinean side of the Pascua-Lama project. If the study concludes that a phased underground development option meets our risk and financial criteria, and is a more compelling investment proposition than the permitted bi-national open pit plan, we would expect to recalculate reserves and resources at Pascua-Lama to reflect an underground mine plan, likely resulting in a reduction to current reserves and resources at the project. Our successful track record of greenfield exploration, combined with our existing pipeline of undeveloped projects, represents significant long-term value and optionality for our shareholders. Highlights of our greenfield exploration program for 2017 include the Fourmile target, adjacent to our Goldrush discovery in Nevada, and the Frontera District on the border of Argentina and Chile. We have also formed new partnerships with Alicanto Minerals in Guyana, and Osisko Mining in the Labrador Trough of Northern Québec, where we see the potential to develop new core mineral districts for Barrick. Our portfolio also contains a number of the world's largest undeveloped gold deposits, including Donlin Gold, Cerro Casale, and Pascua-Lama. These projects contain nearly 31.5 million ounces of gold in proven and probable reserves4 (Barrick's share), and 29.3 million ounces in measured and indicated resources4 (Barrick's share). At Donlin Gold, we continue to advance through the permitting process. We are also working with our joint venture partner on strategies to further optimize the project. This includes evaluating alternative development scenarios with the potential to lower capital intensity, as well as incorporating innovation, automation, and other Best-in-Class opportunities to improve overall economics. At Pascua-Lama, the initiation of a prefeasibility study for an underground mine at Lama in Argentina represents an opportunity to unlock the value of this deposit, and the wider district, through a phased approach that reduces execution risks and upfront capital requirements. Concurrently, the team in Chile remains focused on optimizing the Chilean components of the project. We will provide a detailed update on projects during our upcoming Operations and Technical Update. Visit www.barrick.com for webcast information and presentations on February 22. Shortly, Barrick intends to file an MJDS universal shelf prospectus qualifying for distribution of securities with an aggregate offering amount of up to $4 billion with Canadian securities regulators and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. The filing of a shelf prospectus is consistent with the practice of the majority of issuers included in the S&P/TSX 60 Index. The filing provides the Company with increased financing flexibility over the next 25 month period. We have no current intention to offer securities under the shelf prospectus. The scientific and technical information contained in this press release has been reviewed and approved by Steven Haggarty, P. Eng., Senior Director, Metallurgy of Barrick, Rick Sims, Registered Member SME, Senior Director, Resources and Reserves of Barrick, and Patrick Garretson, Registered Member SME, Senior Director, Life of Mine Planning of Barrick, each a "Qualified Person" as defined in National Instrument 43-101 Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects. Detailed operating and capital expenditure guidance is as follows: "Adjusted net earnings" and "adjusted net earnings per share" are non-GAAP financial performance measures. Adjusted net earnings excludes the following from net earnings: certain impairment charges (reversals), gains (losses) and other one-time costs relating to acquisitions or dispositions, foreign currency translation gains (losses), significant tax adjustments not related to current period earnings and unrealized gains (losses) on non-hedge derivative instruments. The Company uses this measure internally to evaluate our underlying operating performance for the reporting periods presented and to assist with the planning and forecasting of future operating results. Barrick believes that adjusted net earnings is a useful measure of our performance because these adjusting items do not reflect the underlying operating performance of our core mining business and are not necessarily indicative of future operating results. Adjusted net earnings and adjusted net earnings per share are intended to provide additional information only and do not have any standardized meaning under IFRS and may not be comparable to similar measures of performance presented by other companies. They should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures of performance prepared in accordance with IFRS. Further details on these non-GAAP measures are provided in the MD&A accompanying Barrick's financial statements filed from time to time on SEDAR at www.sedar.com and on EDGAR at www.sec.gov. "Free cash flow" is a non-GAAP financial performance measure which excludes capital expenditures from Net cash provided by operating activities. Barrick believes this to be a useful indicator of our ability to operate without reliance on additional borrowing or usage of existing cash. Free cash flow is intended to provide additional information only and does not have any standardized meaning under IFRS and may not be comparable to similar measures of performance presented by other companies. Free cash flow should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures of performance prepared in accordance with IFRS. Further details on these non-GAAP measures are provided in the MD&A accompanying Barrick's financial statements filed from time to time on SEDAR at www.sedar.com and on EDGAR at www.sec.gov. "Cash costs" per ounce and "All-in sustaining costs" per ounce are non-GAAP financial performance measures. "Cash costs" per ounce is based on cost of sales but excludes, among other items, the impact of depreciation. "All-in sustaining costs" per ounce begins with "Cash costs" per ounce and adds further costs which reflect the additional costs of operating a mine, primarily sustaining capital expenditures, general & administrative costs and minesite exploration and evaluation costs. Barrick believes that the use of "cash costs" per ounce and "all-in sustaining costs" per ounce will assist investors, analysts and other stakeholders in understanding the costs associated with producing gold, understanding the economics of gold mining, assessing our operating performance and also our ability to generate free cash flow from current operations and to generate free cash flow on an overall Company basis. "Cash costs" per ounce and "All-in sustaining costs" per ounce are intended to provide additional information only and do not have any standardized meaning under IFRS. Although a standardized definition of all-in sustaining costs was published in 2013 by the World Gold Council (a market development organization for the gold industry comprised of and funded by 18 gold mining companies from around the world, including Barrick), it is not a regulatory organization, and other companies may calculate this measure differently. These measures should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures prepared in accordance with IFRS. Further details on these non-GAAP measures are provided in the MD&A accompanying Barrick's financial statements filed from time to time on SEDAR at www.sedar.com and on EDGAR at www.sec.gov. Estimated in accordance with National Instrument 43-101 as required by Canadian securities regulatory authorities. Estimates are as of December 31, 2016, unless otherwise noted. Proven reserves of 480.3 million tonnes grading 1.68 g/t, representing 25.9 million ounces of gold, and 173.3 million tonnes grading 0.533%, representing 2.035 billion pounds of copper. Probable reserves of 1.5 billion tonnes grading 1.22 g/t, representing 60.1 million ounces of gold, and 276 million tonnes grading 0.638%, representing 3.886 billion pounds of copper. Measured resources of 82.9 million tonnes grading 2.52 g/t, representing 6.7 million ounces of gold, and 83.2 million tonnes grading 0.410%, representing 753.4 million pounds of copper. Indicated resources of 1.2 billion tonnes grading 1.74 g/t, representing 68.5 million ounces of gold, and 650.3 million tonnes grading 0.526%, representing 7.545 billion pounds of copper. Inferred resources of 781 million tonnes grading 1.22 g/t, representing 30.7 million ounces of gold, and 114.1 million tonnes grading 0.501%, representing 1.259 billion pounds of copper. Complete mineral reserve and mineral resource data for all mines and projects referenced in this press release, including tonnes, grades, and ounces, can be found on pages 88-93 of Barrick's Fourth Quarter and Year-End 2016 Report. Comparison based on the average overall reserve grade for Goldcorp Inc., Kinross Gold Corporation, Newmont Mining Corporation, and Newcrest Mining Limited, as reported in each of the Kinross and Newmont reserve reports as of December 31, 2015, as reported in the Goldcorp reserve report as of June 30, 2016, and as reported in the Newcrest reserve report as of December 31, 2016. Excludes $610 million in proceeds related to the Pueblo Viejo streaming transaction. Includes $943 million cash primarily held at Acacia and Pueblo Viejo, which may not be readily deployed outside of Acacia and/or Pueblo Viejo. Amount excludes capital leases and includes project financing payments at Pueblo Viejo (60% basis) and Acacia (100% basis). Total reportable incident frequency rate (TRIFR) is a ratio calculated as follows: number of reportable injuries x 200,000 hours divided by the total number of hours worked. Reportable injuries include fatalities, lost time injuries, restricted duty injuries, and medically treated injuries. "C1 cash costs" per pound and "All-in sustaining costs" per pound are non-GAAP financial performance measures. "C1 cash costs" per pound is based on cost of sales but excludes the impact of depreciation and royalties and includes treatment and refinement charges. "All-in sustaining costs" per pound begins with "C1 cash costs" per pound and adds further costs which reflect the additional costs of operating a mine, primarily sustaining capital expenditures, general & administrative costs and royalties. Barrick believes that the use of "C1 cash costs" per pound and "all-in sustaining costs" per pound will assist investors, analysts, and other stakeholders in understanding the costs associated with producing copper, understanding the economics of copper mining, assessing our operating performance, and also our ability to generate free cash flow from current operations and to generate free cash flow on an overall Company basis. "C1 cash costs" per pound and "All-in sustaining costs" per pound are intended to provide additional information only, do not have any standardized meaning under IFRS, and may not be comparable to similar measures of performance presented by other companies. These measures should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures of performance prepared in accordance with IFRS. Further details on these non-GAAP measures are provided in the MD&A accompanying Barrick's financial statements filed from time to time on SEDAR at www.sedar.com and on EDGAR at www.sec.gov. Due to our hedging activities, which are reflected in these sensitivities, we are partially protected against changes in these factors. Utilizing option collar strategies, the Company has protected the downside of a portion of its expected 2017 copper production at an average floor price of $2.20 per pound, and can participate on the same amount up to an average price of $2.82 per pound. Our remaining copper production is subject to market prices. Certain information contained or incorporated by reference in this Fourth Quarter and Year-End Report 2016, including any information as to our strategy, projects, plans, or future financial or operating performance, constitutes "forward-looking statements". All statements, other than statements of historical fact, are forward-looking statements. The words "believe", "expect", "anticipate", "contemplate", "target", "plan", "objective" "aspiration", "aim", "intend", "project", "goal", "continue", "budget", "estimate", "potential", "may", "will", "can", "should", "could", "would", and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. In particular, this Fourth Quarter and Year-End Report 2016 contains forward-looking statements including, without limitation, with respect to: (i) Barrick's forward-looking production guidance; (ii) estimates of future cost of sales per ounce for gold and per pound for copper, all-in-sustaining costs per ounce/pound, cash costs per ounce, and C1 cash costs per pound; (iii) cash flow forecasts; (iv) projected capital, operating, and exploration expenditures; (v) targeted debt and cost reductions; (vi) mine life and production rates; (vii) potential mineralization and metal or mineral recoveries; (viii) Barrick's Best-in-Class program (including potential improvements to financial and operating performance that may result from certain Best- in-Class initiatives); (ix) the Lama starter project and the potential for phased-in development of the Pascua-Lama project; (x) the potential to identify new reserves and resources; (xi) our pipeline of high confidence projects at or near existing operations; (xii) the extension of mine life at Lagunas Norte; (xiii) the benefits of integrating the Cortez and Goldstrike operations; (xiv) the potential impact and benefits of Barrick's digital transformation; (xv) asset sales, joint ventures, and partnerships; and (xvi) expectations regarding future price assumptions, financial performance, and other outlook or guidance. Forward-looking statements are necessarily based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that, while considered reasonable by the Company as at the date of this press release in light of management's experience and perception of current conditions and expected developments, are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies. Known and unknown factors could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements, and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements and information. Such factors include, but are not limited to: fluctuations in the spot and forward price of gold, copper, or certain other commodities (such as silver, diesel fuel, natural gas, and electricity); the speculative nature of mineral exploration and development; changes in mineral production performance, exploitation, and exploration successes; risks associated with the fact that certain Best-in-Class initiatives are still in the early stages of evaluation, and additional engineering and other analysis is required to fully assess their impact; risks associated with the implementation of Barrick's digital transformation initiative, and the ability of the projects under this initiative to meet the Company's capital allocation objectives; diminishing quantities or grades of reserves; increased costs, delays, suspensions, and technical challenges associated with the construction of capital projects; operating or technical difficulties in connection with mining or development activities, including geotechnical challenges, and disruptions in the maintenance or provision of required infrastructure and information technology systems; failure to comply with environmental and health and safety laws and regulations; timing of receipt of, or failure to comply with, necessary permits and approvals; uncertainty whether some or all of the Best-in-Class initiatives and targeted investments will meet the Company's capital allocation objectives; the impact of global liquidity and credit availability on the timing of cash flows and the values of assets and liabilities based on projected future cash flows; adverse changes in our credit ratings; the impact of inflation; fluctuations in the currency markets; changes in U.S. dollar interest rates; risks arising from holding derivative instruments; changes in national and local government legislation, taxation, controls or regulations, and/or changes in the administration of laws, policies, and practices, expropriation or nationalization of property and political or economic developments in Canada, the United States, and other jurisdictions in which the Company does or may carry on business in the future; lack of certainty with respect to foreign legal systems, corruption, and other factors that are inconsistent with the rule of law; damage to the Company's reputation due to the actual or perceived occurrence of any number of events, including negative publicity with respect to the Company's handling of environmental matters or dealings with community groups, whether true or not; risk of loss due to acts of war, terrorism, sabotage, and civil disturbances; litigation; contests over title to properties, particularly title to undeveloped properties, or over access to water, power and other required infrastructure; business opportunities that may be presented to, or pursued by, the Company; our ability to successfully integrate acquisitions or complete divestitures; risks associated with working with partners in jointly controlled assets; employee relations including loss of key employees; increased costs and physical risks, including extreme weather events and resource shortage, related to climate change; availability and increased costs associated with mining inputs and labor; and the organization of our previously held African gold operations and properties under a separate listed Company. In addition, there are risks and hazards associated with the business of mineral exploration, development and mining, including environmental hazards, industrial accidents, unusual or unexpected formations, pressures, cave-ins, flooding and gold bullion, copper cathode or gold or copper concentrate losses (and the risk of inadequate insurance, or inability to obtain insurance, to cover these risks). Many of these uncertainties and contingencies can affect our actual results and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements made by, or on behalf of, us. Readers are cautioned that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. All of the forward-looking statements made in this Fourth Quarter and Year-End Report 2016 are qualified by these cautionary statements. Specific reference is made to the most recent Form 40-F/Annual Information Form on file with the SEC and Canadian provincial securities regulatory authorities for a more detailed discussion of some of the factors underlying forward- looking statements and the risks that may affect Barrick's ability to achieve the expectations set forth in the forward-looking statements contained in this press release. The Company disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by applicable law.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

All amounts expressed in U.S. dollars TORONTO, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - Feb. 15, 2017) - Barrick Gold Corporation (NYSE:ABX)(TSX:ABX) ("Barrick" or the "Company") today reported progress on projects with the potential to contribute up to 1.1 million ounces of gold production at Cortez, Goldrush, Lagunas Norte, and Turquoise Ridge. The Company has also initiated a prefeasibility study to evaluate the construction of an underground mine at Lama, on the Argentinean side of the Pascua-Lama project. Optimization work in Chile remains underway. All projects go through a rigorous, independent peer review process led by our Evaluations team. In keeping with our Best-in-Class approach, at every stage of the investment review process we challenge assumptions, incorporate improvements, and evaluate alternative development scenarios to maximize value creation. We measure our projects against a 15 percent hurdle rate, using a long-term gold price of $1,200 per ounce. They are then ranked, prioritized, and sequenced to optimize capital spending over time, allowing us to anticipate and plan for funding requirements. For certain related risk factors, please see the cautionary statement on forward-looking information at the end of this press release. Project Overview: Expand underground mining into Deep South area, below currently permitted levels The Deep South project, located within the Lower Zone of the Cortez Hills underground mine, remains on track to contribute average underground production of more than 300,000 ounces per year between 2022 and 2026. Development of the range front twin declines that will provide access to the lower zone of the mine began in the fourth quarter of 2016. For the first time, the mine is using a roadheader-a piece of machinery that employs mechanical cutting to facilitate continuous tunnel boring, rather than traditional drilling and blasting. The prefeasibility study anticipated a cost of sales of $840 per ounce, and average all-in sustaining costs2 of $580 per ounce, for mining in the Deep South zone. Optimization work underway as part of the feasibility study has identified a number of opportunities to reduce these costs, including through the use of autonomous loading with a smart conveyance system, compared to a traditional conveyor system contemplated in the prefeasibility study. Initial capital costs for the project remain unchanged, and are estimated to be $153 million. The expansion will enable the Company to access approximately 1.9 million ounces of proven and probable reserves3 in the Deep South zone, of which more than 80 percent are oxide. Permitting was initiated in 2016 with the submission of an amendment to the current Mine Plan of Operations to the Bureau of Land Management. The permitting process is expected to take approximately three to four years, including the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement. A record of decision is expected in 2019 or 2020. On this basis, dewatering and development work could begin as early as 2019 or 2020, with initial production from Deep South commencing in 2022 or 2023. We expect to complete the feasibility study by the end of 2017, which will focus on processing, backfill, and stope sequencing to optimize free cash flow. Project Overview: Development of an underground mine at Goldrush The Goldrush project continues to advance according to schedule, with the potential to become Barrick's newest mine in Nevada by 2021. Average annual production for the first full five years of operation is expected to be approximately 450,000 ounces of gold. Goldrush is expected to have a mine life of 21 years, with first production as early as 2021, and sustained production in 2023. The prefeasibility study anticipated a cost of sales of $800 per ounce, and average all-in sustaining costs2 of $620 per ounce; and we have identified opportunities to further reduce operating costs. We continue to anticipate initial capital costs of approximately $1 billion. Goldrush now has 9.6 million ounces of measured and indicated gold resources3, and 1.9 million ounces of inferred gold resources.3 During 2016, we obtained the necessary permits for the construction of twin exploration declines. This will enable further drilling of the ore body in support of the feasibility study, including the conversion of measured and indicated resources to proven and probable reserves. The twin decline portal access site has been cleared, and work is expected to begin on the portal pad in the first quarter of 2017. We are also carrying out additional surface exploration drilling in the Red Hill zone, the shallowest portion of the Goldrush deposit. Permitting is expected to commence in 2018, initiating a three- to four-year Environmental Impact Statement process. Underground development and production activities would commence following receipt of permits. The Goldrush deposit remains open in a number of directions. In addition, the Company continues to drill at the highly prospective Fourmile target, just north of the Goldrush discovery. Project Overview: Optimization of carbonaceous oxide ore recovery, and installation of refractory ore processing circuit We are now evaluating a sequenced approach to extending the life of the Lagunas Norte mine by first optimizing the recovery of carbonaceous oxide ore contained in existing stockpiles, followed by extraction and processing of refractory ores. The prefeasibility study for the Refractory Ore project contemplated an initial capital investment of approximately $640 million for the installation of a 6,000 tonnes per day grinding-flotation-autoclave and carbon-in-leach processing circuit to treat refractory material. Once ramped up, the circuit has the potential to produce an average of 240,000 ounces of gold per year at a cost of sales of approximately $1,080 per ounce and all-in sustaining costs2 of $625 per ounce. Over the past year, Lagunas Norte has developed a process to treat certain carbonaceous oxide material already stockpiled at the mine through heap leaching, helping to bridge the gap between processing of oxide and refractory materials. This has created an opportunity to first construct a grinding and carbon-in-leach processing circuit that would treat the remaining carbonaceous oxide material at the site. This would allow us to defer the construction of the flotation and pressure oxidation circuits required for treating refractory ore, optimizing the timing of capital expenditures. Engineering for the grinding and carbon-in-leach circuits is underway at a feasibility level, and will be available for Investment Committee review by the end of 2017. Pending a positive investment decision and receipt of permits, construction of these facilities could begin in late 2018, with first production in 2020. Following this, and subject to Environmental Impact Assessment approval, construction of the refractory ore processing facilities (flotation and pressure oxidation circuits) could begin as early as 2020, with first production in 2023. Project Overview: Expand underground mining through construction of an additional production shaft We continue to advance a phased approach to expansion at Barrick's 75 percent owned Turquoise Ridge mine that maximizes free cash flow from the operation, while optimizing the timing of capital spending for expansion. Through the development of a third shaft, the mine has the potential to increase output to an average of 500,000 ounces per year (100 percent basis) from existing reserves at a cost of sales of $750-$800 per ounce, and all-in sustaining costs2 of about $625-$675 per ounce. The project would require capital expenditures of approximately $300-$325 million (100 percent basis) for additional underground development and shaft construction. The first phase of expansion has been focused on leveraging Best-in-Class initiatives to maximize productivity from the existing mine infrastructure, with strong results. Turquoise Ridge recorded its highest-ever level of production in 2016, producing 355,000 ounces of gold (100 percent basis), at a cost of sales applicable to gold of $593 per ounce, and all-in sustaining costs2 of $618 per ounce. Average throughput increased by 40 percent, from 1,500 tonnes per day in 2015, to 2,100 tonnes per day in 2016. Improvements in mining intensity and reliability have been driven by upgrades to underground ventilation systems, increasing top cut mining widths, greater equipment standardization, and better maintenance. Additional Best-in-Class initiatives under evaluation include the introduction of continuous mining, increased automation, additional ventilation modifications, and alternative mining methods. Based on the rapid pace of improvement at the mine, we are evaluating whether to proceed directly to the construction of a third production shaft, instead of the installation of a new ventilation shaft, which was previously contemplated as the second phase of the mine expansion. All necessary permits for a third production shaft are already in place. At the end of 2016, the Turquoise Ridge mine had four million ounces of gold in reserves (75 percent basis)3 at an average grade of 15.1 grams per tonne-the highest reserve grade in the Company's operating portfolio, and among the highest in the entire gold industry. The mine also has 3.0 million ounces of measured gold resources3, and 6.5 million ounces of indicated gold resources (75 percent basis).3 The Turquoise Ridge deposit remains open to the northeast, with significant potential to add additional reserves and resources through drilling. Following a detailed review of multiple development options for Pascua Lama in 2016, both open-pit and underground, we have initiated a prefeasibility study to evaluate the construction of an underground mine at Lama. The study will evaluate the use of low-cost bulk mining methods, including sub-level cave and block cave mining, designed to target higher-value ore on the Argentinean side of the border in the initial stages of the operation. Cash flow from Lama could support a staged development that would, over time, incorporate ore from the Chilean side of the border, subject to additional permitting in Chile. Efforts in Chile this year will focus on advancing project concepts in parallel with the Lama study, with the intention of moving to a prefeasibility level study in 2018. Conceptually, initial ore processing at Lama would be undertaken using one of three partially completed processing streams at the site, with a capacity of approximately 15,000 tonnes per day. Existing infrastructure could be scaled up to 25,000 tonnes per day at a later date. An underground mine would reduce the surface footprint of the operation and would be less susceptible to weather-related production interruptions during the winter season. Estimated capital costs for the project will be available following the completion of the prefeasibility study. Based on scoping work, the returns of the Lama project deteriorate if initial capital is much more than $1.5 billion. Returns are also dependent on the ability to access Chilean ore sources in future phases of the project. If we cannot build the project at an attractive return, we will not pursue it. As part of the prefeasibility study, we will be evaluating opportunities to leverage innovation and new technology to strengthen the economics of the project, in addition to potential synergies with the nearby Veladero mine. Assuming a positive prefeasibility study result, permitting could begin in 2018. The timing of first production would depend on multiple factors, including permitting timelines, funding requirements, and a decision to proceed with the project. Beyond Pascua-Lama, we are evaluating an integrated development strategy for the Frontera District, which includes Veladero and Alturas. At the Alturas project in Chile, we have added an additional 1.1 million ounces of inferred gold resources, bringing the total inferred resource to 6.8 million ounces.3 We expect to complete a scoping study for the project in 2017. Ultimately, our objective is to capitalize on the significant growth potential of this highly prolific and prospective district, leveraging our existing footprint and infrastructure in the region, as a platform for long-term value creation. The following qualified persons, as that term is defined in National Instrument 43-101 - Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects, have prepared or supervised the preparation of their relevant portions of the technical information described in this press release: Certain information contained or incorporated by reference in this press release, including any information as to our strategy, projects, plans or future financial or operating performance, constitutes "forward-looking statements". All statements, other than statements of historical fact, are forward-looking statements. The words "believe", "expect", "anticipate", "contemplate", "target", "plan", "objective", "intend", "project", "continue", "budget", "estimate", "potential", "may", "will", "can", "could" and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. In particular, this press release contains forward-looking statements including, without limitation, with respect to: potential improvements to financial and operating performance and mine life at Barrick's Cortez, Lagunas Norte and Turquoise Ridge mines; potential developments at Barrick's Goldrush and Pascua Lama projects; estimates of future cost of sales and all-in sustaining costs per ounce and projected capital, operating and exploration expenditures; mine life and production rates; potential mineralization and metal or mineral recoveries; expectations regarding future price and cost assumptions, financial performance and other outlook or guidance; and the estimated timing and conclusions of technical reports and other studies. Forward-looking statements are necessarily based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that, while considered reasonable by the Company as at the date of this press release in light of management's experience and perception of current conditions and expected developments, are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies. Known and unknown factors could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements and information. Such factors include, but are not limited to: fluctuations in the spot and forward price of gold, copper or certain other commodities (such as silver, diesel fuel, natural gas and electricity); the speculative nature of mineral exploration and development; changes in mineral production performance, exploitation and exploration successes; risks associated with the fact that initiatives described in this release are still in the early stages of evaluation and additional engineering and other analysis is required to fully assess their impact; diminishing quantities or grades of reserves; increased costs, delays, suspensions and technical challenges associated with the construction of capital projects; operating or technical difficulties in connection with mining or development activities, including disruptions in the maintenance or provision of required infrastructure and information technology systems; failure to comply with environmental and health and safety laws and regulations; timing of receipt of, or failure to comply with, necessary permits and approvals; uncertainty whether some or all of the initiatives will meet the Company's capital allocation objectives and internal hurdle rate; the impact of global liquidity and credit availability on the timing of cash flows and the values of assets and liabilities based on projected future cash flows; adverse changes in our credit ratings; the impact of inflation; fluctuations in the currency markets; changes in U.S. dollar interest rates; risks arising from holding derivative instruments; changes in national and local government legislation, taxation, controls or regulations and/or changes in the administration of laws, policies and practices, expropriation or nationalization of property and political or economic developments in Canada, United States, Peru, Argentina and other jurisdictions in which the Company does or may carry on business in the future; damage to the Company's reputation due to the actual or perceived occurrence of any number of events, including negative publicity with respect to the Company's handling of environmental matters or dealings with community groups, whether true or not; the possibility that future exploration results will not be consistent with the Company's expectations; risks that exploration data may be incomplete and considerable additional work may be required to complete further evaluation, including but not limited to drilling, engineering and socio-economic studies and investment; risk of loss due to acts of war, terrorism, sabotage and civil disturbances; litigation; contests over title to properties, particularly title to undeveloped properties, or over access to water, power and other required infrastructure; business opportunities that may be presented to, or pursued by, the Company; risks associated with working with partners in jointly controlled assets; employee relations; increased costs and risks related to the potential impact of climate change; and availability and increased costs associated with mining inputs and labor. In addition, there are risks and hazards associated with the business of mineral exploration, development and mining, including environmental hazards, industrial accidents, unusual or unexpected formations, pressures, cave-ins, flooding and gold bullion, copper cathode or gold or copper concentrate losses (and the risk of inadequate insurance, or inability to obtain insurance, to cover these risks). Many of these uncertainties and contingencies can affect our actual results and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements made by, or on behalf of, us. Readers are cautioned that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. All of the forward-looking statements made in this press release are qualified by these cautionary statements. Specific reference is made to the most recent Form 40-F/Annual Information Form on file with the SEC and Canadian provincial securities regulatory authorities for a more detailed discussion of some of the factors underlying forward-looking statements and the risks that may affect Barrick's ability to achieve the expectations set forth in the forward-looking statements contained in this press release. The Company disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by applicable law.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

new educational sessions produced and sponsored by Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD), April 4+5, 2017 at the Seaport World Trade Center Boston. The Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD) sessions at MED|Ed Facilities® will focus on social sustainability and Complete descriptions and additional sessions are available at http://www.mededboston.com. The exhibit area will provide opportunities for product manufacturers to display healthy products to the design and construction professionals who attend the event. Valerie Fletcher, Executive Director, Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD) states, “The Institute for Human Centered Design has chosen to use the term "human centered design" as the most representative of our philosophy. We are invested in the international universal design/design-for-all/inclusive design movement but we believe that it is important to be open to complementary ideas that make sense within the simple and open framework of human centered design. Important parallel trends today include green design and design for health and healing. We see value in finding the common ground between movements and in working collaboratively.” Richard Vendola, MED|Ed Facilities Boston Principal notes, “To support our goal of delivering the highest quality educational programs for the design and construction professionals in the Northeast, we partnered with the premier experts on subject matter, and IHCD is exactly that when it comes to human-centered or universal design. We are happy to be able to draw on Valerie Fletcher and her associates knowledge and experience.” About the Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD) The Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD) is an international education and design non-profit organization committed to advancing the role of design in expanding opportunity and enhancing experience for people of all ages, abilities and cultures. IHCD was founded in Boston in 1978 as Adaptive Environments and changed its name on its 30th anniversary to have an identity more reflective of current work. IHCD’s headquarters remain in Boston though some of the team work remotely in other parts of the US. IHCD meets its mission through an unusual mix of education, technical assistance, consulting, and interdisciplinary design services. Each activity informs the others for a dynamic interplay of expertise, learning, and exploration. IHCD offers deep content expertise in both accessibility and universal/inclusive design. IHCD understands accessibility as a floor or baseline for inclusive design and the practice of designing for people across the broadest spectrum of ability and age as a dynamic activity at the heart of socially sustainable design. About MED|Ed Facilities® MED|Ed Facilities is produced in collaboration with Tradeshow Management Services Ltd. (TMS), a full-service tradeshow company specializing in conferences and tradeshows for the design, building and construction marketplace. TMS has been affiliated with leading events including AEC SYSTEMS, ArchitectureBoston Expo (ABX), Build Boston, Residential Design & Construction, Ecobuild America, Federal Construction Outlook Conference, BIM Expo, and Construction Technology. The event is held in cooperation with the Construction Specifications Institute Boston, USGBC-MA, FGI and Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD). # # #


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Dublin, Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of Jain PharmaBiotech's new report "Therapeutic Drug Monitoring - Technologies, Markets, and Companies" to their offering. This report deals with therapeutic drug monitoring, a multi-disciplinary clinical specialty, aimed at improving patient care by monitoring drug levels in the blood to individually adjust the dose of drugs for improving outcome. TDM is viewed as a component of personalized medicine that interacts with several other disciplines including pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics. One chapter is devoted to monitoring of drugs of abuse (DoA). Various technologies used for well-known DoA are described. A section on drug abuse describes methods of detection of performance-enhancing drugs. TDM market is analyzed from 2015 to 2025 according to technologies as well as geographical distribution. Global market for DoA testing was also analyzed from 2016 to 2026 and divided according to the area of application. Unmet needs and strategies for development of markets for TDM are discussed. The report contains profiles of 27 companies involved in developing tests and equipment for drug monitoring along with their collaborations. The text is supplemented with 18 tables, 6 figures and 190 selected references from literature. Benefits of this report: - Up-to-date one-stop information on therapeutic drug monitoring - Description of 27 companies involved with their collaborations in this area - Market analysis 2016-2026/ - Market values in major regions - Strategies for developing markets for therapeutic drug monitoring - A selected bibliography of 190 publications - Text is supplemented by 18 tables and 6 figures Who should read this report? - Biotechnology companies developing assays and equipment for drug monitoring - Reference laboratories providing drug monitoring services - Pharmaceutical companies interested in companion tests for monitoring their drugs - Clinical pharmacologists interested in integrating therapeutic drug monitoring with pharmacogenetics for development of personalized medicine Key Topics Covered: Executive Summary 1. Introduction Definitions Historical Landmarks in the development of TDM Pharmacology relevant to TDM Pharmacokinetics Pharmacodynamics Pharmacogenetics Pharmacogenomics Pharmacoproteomics Drug receptors Protein binding Therapeutic range of a drug Variables that affect TDM Indications for TDM Multidisciplinary nature of TDM 2. Technologies for TDM Introduction Sample preparation Proteomic technologies Mass spectrometry Liquid chromatography MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combining capillary electrophoresis with MS Gas-liquid chromatography Tissue imaging mass spectrometry New trends in sample preparation Pressure Cycling Technology Desorption electrospray ionization imaging High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) Ultra performance LC TDM using dry blood spots Analysis of dried blood spots for drugs using DESI Quantitative analysis of drugs in dried blood spot by paper spray MS Immunoassays Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay Cloned Enzyme Donor Immunoassay Enzyme Multiplied Immunoassay Technique Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay Particle Enhanced Turbidimetric Inhibition Immunoassay Radioimmunometric assays Biosensors Nanosensors Biochips & Microarrays Introduction Microchip capillary electrophoresis Phototransistor biochip biosensor Microchip-based fluorescence polarization immunoassay for TDM Cellular microarrays Microfluidics for TDM Lab-on-a-chip Micronics' microfluidic technology Rheonix CARD technology Nano-interface in a microfluidic chip Levitation of nanofluidic drops with physical forces Nanoarrays Nanobiotechology NanoDx Biomarkers Applications of biomarkers in drug safety studies Genomic technologies for toxicology biomarkers Proteomic technologies for toxicology biomarkers Metabonomic technologies for toxicology biomarkers Integration of genomic and metabonomic data to develop toxicity biomarkers Toxicology studies based on biomarkers Biomarkers of hepatotoxicity Biomarkers of nephrotoxicity Cardiotoxicity Neurotoxicity Biomarkers in clinical trials Molecular diagnostics 3. Drug Monitoring Instruments Introduction Description of important instruments AB SCIEX instruments AB SCIEX LC/MS/MS Abbott instruments ARCHITECT c16000 ARCHITECT c4000 ARCHITECT c8000 ARCHITECT ci16200 Integrated System ARCHITECT ci4100 Integrated System ARCHITECT ci8200 integrated with the ARCHITECT i2000SR ARCHITECT i1000SR ARCHITECT i4000SR AxSYM Agilent's 6400 Series Triple Quadrupole LC/MS Alfa Wassermann's ACE Alera AMS Diagnostics' LIASYS Awareness Technology's STAT FAX 4500 Beckman Coulter instruments Beckman Coulter Unicel Series AU5800 automated chemistry systems AU480 Binding Site ESP600 bioMerieux Mini Vidas Carolina BioLis 24i Chromsystems' HPLC instruments Grifols Triturus ABX Pentra 400 Medica EasyRA Nova Biomedical Critical Care Xpress Ortho Clinical Diagnostics' VITROS® family of systems Immunodiagnostic systems Randox intruments Randox RX Imola Roche instruments Cobas® 8000 COBAS INTEGRA® Systems Siemens instruments ADVIA 1200 ADVIA Centaur XP immunoassay system EMIT® II Plus Syva® Viva® Drug Testing Systems Dimension® Xpand® Plus Integrated Chemistry System Thermo Scientific instruments Indiko Tosoh AIA-Series 4. Applications of TDM Introduction Pharmaceutical research and drug development Clinical trials Computerized clinical decision support systems for TDM and dosing Medication-related interferences with measurements of catecholamines Polymorphisms of genes affecting drug metabolism TDM for drug safety TDM in special groups The aged Children Pregnancy TDM of prophylactic therapy Monitoring of vitamin D levels Monitoring of RBC folic acid levels during pregancy Personalized medicine Role of TDM in personalized medicine Applications according to various conditions Anesthesia and critical care Optimizing antimicrobial dosing for critically ill patients TDM monitoring of thiopental continuous infusion in critical care Role of TDM in critical care cardiac patients. Cancer Epilepsy Personalized approach to use of AEDs Infections Virus infections Fungal infections Pain management Role of TDM in pain management Monitoring of analgesic drugs in urine samples AEDs as analgesics Triptans for migraine Psychiatric disorders Guidelines for use of TDM in psychiatric patients TDM of psychotropic drugs Transplantation TDM of Tacrolismus in transplantation TDM of cyclosporine A in transplantation Monitoring of immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil Emergency toxicology Future prospects of TDM 5. Drugs Requiring Monitoring Introduction Antiepileptics Carbamazepine TDM of carbamazepine Gabapentin Lacosamide Lamotrigine TDM of lamotrigine Levetiracetam TDM of levetiracetam Phenobarbital TDM of phenobarbital Phenytoin TDM of phenytoin Primidone TDM of primidone Topiramate TDM of topiramate Valproic acid TDM of valproic acid TDM of multiple antiepileptic drugs in plasma/serum Antimicrobials Antibiotics Amikacin Anti-tuberculosis drugs Chloramphenicol Gentamicin Tobramycin Vancomycin Norvancomycin Antiviral agents Anti-HIV drugs Antifungal agents Voriconazole Antidepressants TDM of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors Antipsychotics Aripiprazole Quetiapine TDM of risperidone TDM of AEDs in psychiatric disorders TDM of multiple drugs in psychiatry Bronchodilators Theophylline Cardiovascular drugs Antiarrhythmic drugs Anticoagulants Dabigatran Antihypertensive drugs ß-blockers Cardiotonic drugs Digoxin TDM of statins for hypercholesterolemia Chemotherapy for cancer TDM of 5-FU TDM of Methotrexate TDM of imitanib Drugs used for treatment of Alzheimer disease Donepezil Galantamine Memantine Drugs used for treatment of Parkinson disease Monitoring of levodopa and carbidopa therapy Catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors Drugs for treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder Atomoxetine Methylphenidate Hypnotic-sedative drugs Benzodiazepines Propofol Immunosuppressive drugs TDM of mycophenolic acid for the treatment of lupus nephritis Steroids Prednisone Miscellaneous drugs Azathioprine Sildenafil 6. Monitoring of Biological Therapies Introduction Cell therapy In vivo tracking of cells Molecular imaging for tracking cells MRI technologies for tracking cells Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents Visualization of gene expression in vivo by MRI Gene therapy Application of molecular diagnostic methods in gene therapy Use of PCR to study biodistribution of gene therapy vector PCR for verification of the transcription of DNA In situ PCR for direct quantification of gene transfer into cells Detection of retroviruses by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR Confirmation of viral vector integration Monitoring of gene expression Monitoring of gene expression by green fluorescent protein Monitoring in vivo gene expression by molecular imaging Monoclonal antibodies Natalizumab 7. Monitoring of Drug Abuse Introduction Tests used for detection of drug abuse Forensic applications of detection of illicit drugs in fingerprints by MALDI MS MS for doping control Randox assays for DoA Drugs of Abuse Array V Urine drug testing TDM of drugs for treatment of substance abuse-related disorders Drug testing to monitor treatment of drug abuse Minimum requirement for drug testing in patients Analgesic abuse ?-blockers as doping agents Detection of ß-blockers in urine Chronic alcohol abuse Cocaine CEDIA for cocaine in human serum Detection of cocaine molecules by nanoparticle-labeled aptasensors Infrared spectroscopy for detection of cocaine in saliva Marijuana Use of marijuana and synthetic cannabinoids Detection of cannabinoids ELISA for detection of synthetic cannabinoids Drug abuse for performance enhancement in sports Historical aspects of drug abuse in sports Drugs used by athletes for performance enhancement Techniques used for detection of drug abuse by athletes Mass spectrometry for detection of peptide hormones miRNAs for the detection of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents Detection of anabolic steroids Body fluids and tissues used for detection of drug abuse in sports Urine drug testing Spray (sweat) drug test kits Hair drug testing Gene doping in sports Gene transfer methods used for enhancing physical performance Misuse of cell therapy in sport Challenges of detecting genetic manipulations in athletes Drug abuse testing in race horses Limitations and future prospects Role of pharmaceutical industry in anti-doping testing 8. Markets for TDM Introduction Methods for market estimation and future forecasts Markets for TDM tests Markets for TDM and DoA testing equipment Geographical distribution of markets for TDM tests Drivers for growth of TDM markets Markets for DoA testing Unmet needs in TDM Cost-benefit studies Simplifying assays and reducing time and cost Strategies for developing markets Physician education Supporting research on TDM Biomarker patents for drug monitoring 9. Companies Profiles of companies Collaborations 10. References For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/g4tq2x/therapeutic_drug


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Dublin, Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of Jain PharmaBiotech's new report "Therapeutic Drug Monitoring - Technologies, Markets, and Companies" to their offering. This report deals with therapeutic drug monitoring, a multi-disciplinary clinical specialty, aimed at improving patient care by monitoring drug levels in the blood to individually adjust the dose of drugs for improving outcome. TDM is viewed as a component of personalized medicine that interacts with several other disciplines including pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics. One chapter is devoted to monitoring of drugs of abuse (DoA). Various technologies used for well-known DoA are described. A section on drug abuse describes methods of detection of performance-enhancing drugs. TDM market is analyzed from 2015 to 2025 according to technologies as well as geographical distribution. Global market for DoA testing was also analyzed from 2016 to 2026 and divided according to the area of application. Unmet needs and strategies for development of markets for TDM are discussed. The report contains profiles of 27 companies involved in developing tests and equipment for drug monitoring along with their collaborations. The text is supplemented with 18 tables, 6 figures and 190 selected references from literature. Benefits of this report: - Up-to-date one-stop information on therapeutic drug monitoring - Description of 27 companies involved with their collaborations in this area - Market analysis 2016-2026/ - Market values in major regions - Strategies for developing markets for therapeutic drug monitoring - A selected bibliography of 190 publications - Text is supplemented by 18 tables and 6 figures Who should read this report? - Biotechnology companies developing assays and equipment for drug monitoring - Reference laboratories providing drug monitoring services - Pharmaceutical companies interested in companion tests for monitoring their drugs - Clinical pharmacologists interested in integrating therapeutic drug monitoring with pharmacogenetics for development of personalized medicine Key Topics Covered: Executive Summary 1. Introduction Definitions Historical Landmarks in the development of TDM Pharmacology relevant to TDM Pharmacokinetics Pharmacodynamics Pharmacogenetics Pharmacogenomics Pharmacoproteomics Drug receptors Protein binding Therapeutic range of a drug Variables that affect TDM Indications for TDM Multidisciplinary nature of TDM 2. Technologies for TDM Introduction Sample preparation Proteomic technologies Mass spectrometry Liquid chromatography MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combining capillary electrophoresis with MS Gas-liquid chromatography Tissue imaging mass spectrometry New trends in sample preparation Pressure Cycling Technology Desorption electrospray ionization imaging High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) Ultra performance LC TDM using dry blood spots Analysis of dried blood spots for drugs using DESI Quantitative analysis of drugs in dried blood spot by paper spray MS Immunoassays Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay Cloned Enzyme Donor Immunoassay Enzyme Multiplied Immunoassay Technique Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay Particle Enhanced Turbidimetric Inhibition Immunoassay Radioimmunometric assays Biosensors Nanosensors Biochips & Microarrays Introduction Microchip capillary electrophoresis Phototransistor biochip biosensor Microchip-based fluorescence polarization immunoassay for TDM Cellular microarrays Microfluidics for TDM Lab-on-a-chip Micronics' microfluidic technology Rheonix CARD technology Nano-interface in a microfluidic chip Levitation of nanofluidic drops with physical forces Nanoarrays Nanobiotechology NanoDx Biomarkers Applications of biomarkers in drug safety studies Genomic technologies for toxicology biomarkers Proteomic technologies for toxicology biomarkers Metabonomic technologies for toxicology biomarkers Integration of genomic and metabonomic data to develop toxicity biomarkers Toxicology studies based on biomarkers Biomarkers of hepatotoxicity Biomarkers of nephrotoxicity Cardiotoxicity Neurotoxicity Biomarkers in clinical trials Molecular diagnostics 3. Drug Monitoring Instruments Introduction Description of important instruments AB SCIEX instruments AB SCIEX LC/MS/MS Abbott instruments ARCHITECT c16000 ARCHITECT c4000 ARCHITECT c8000 ARCHITECT ci16200 Integrated System ARCHITECT ci4100 Integrated System ARCHITECT ci8200 integrated with the ARCHITECT i2000SR ARCHITECT i1000SR ARCHITECT i4000SR AxSYM Agilent's 6400 Series Triple Quadrupole LC/MS Alfa Wassermann's ACE Alera AMS Diagnostics' LIASYS Awareness Technology's STAT FAX 4500 Beckman Coulter instruments Beckman Coulter Unicel Series AU5800 automated chemistry systems AU480 Binding Site ESP600 bioMerieux Mini Vidas Carolina BioLis 24i Chromsystems' HPLC instruments Grifols Triturus ABX Pentra 400 Medica EasyRA Nova Biomedical Critical Care Xpress Ortho Clinical Diagnostics' VITROS® family of systems Immunodiagnostic systems Randox intruments Randox RX Imola Roche instruments Cobas® 8000 COBAS INTEGRA® Systems Siemens instruments ADVIA 1200 ADVIA Centaur XP immunoassay system EMIT® II Plus Syva® Viva® Drug Testing Systems Dimension® Xpand® Plus Integrated Chemistry System Thermo Scientific instruments Indiko Tosoh AIA-Series 4. Applications of TDM Introduction Pharmaceutical research and drug development Clinical trials Computerized clinical decision support systems for TDM and dosing Medication-related interferences with measurements of catecholamines Polymorphisms of genes affecting drug metabolism TDM for drug safety TDM in special groups The aged Children Pregnancy TDM of prophylactic therapy Monitoring of vitamin D levels Monitoring of RBC folic acid levels during pregancy Personalized medicine Role of TDM in personalized medicine Applications according to various conditions Anesthesia and critical care Optimizing antimicrobial dosing for critically ill patients TDM monitoring of thiopental continuous infusion in critical care Role of TDM in critical care cardiac patients. Cancer Epilepsy Personalized approach to use of AEDs Infections Virus infections Fungal infections Pain management Role of TDM in pain management Monitoring of analgesic drugs in urine samples AEDs as analgesics Triptans for migraine Psychiatric disorders Guidelines for use of TDM in psychiatric patients TDM of psychotropic drugs Transplantation TDM of Tacrolismus in transplantation TDM of cyclosporine A in transplantation Monitoring of immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil Emergency toxicology Future prospects of TDM 5. Drugs Requiring Monitoring Introduction Antiepileptics Carbamazepine TDM of carbamazepine Gabapentin Lacosamide Lamotrigine TDM of lamotrigine Levetiracetam TDM of levetiracetam Phenobarbital TDM of phenobarbital Phenytoin TDM of phenytoin Primidone TDM of primidone Topiramate TDM of topiramate Valproic acid TDM of valproic acid TDM of multiple antiepileptic drugs in plasma/serum Antimicrobials Antibiotics Amikacin Anti-tuberculosis drugs Chloramphenicol Gentamicin Tobramycin Vancomycin Norvancomycin Antiviral agents Anti-HIV drugs Antifungal agents Voriconazole Antidepressants TDM of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors Antipsychotics Aripiprazole Quetiapine TDM of risperidone TDM of AEDs in psychiatric disorders TDM of multiple drugs in psychiatry Bronchodilators Theophylline Cardiovascular drugs Antiarrhythmic drugs Anticoagulants Dabigatran Antihypertensive drugs ß-blockers Cardiotonic drugs Digoxin TDM of statins for hypercholesterolemia Chemotherapy for cancer TDM of 5-FU TDM of Methotrexate TDM of imitanib Drugs used for treatment of Alzheimer disease Donepezil Galantamine Memantine Drugs used for treatment of Parkinson disease Monitoring of levodopa and carbidopa therapy Catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors Drugs for treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder Atomoxetine Methylphenidate Hypnotic-sedative drugs Benzodiazepines Propofol Immunosuppressive drugs TDM of mycophenolic acid for the treatment of lupus nephritis Steroids Prednisone Miscellaneous drugs Azathioprine Sildenafil 6. Monitoring of Biological Therapies Introduction Cell therapy In vivo tracking of cells Molecular imaging for tracking cells MRI technologies for tracking cells Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents Visualization of gene expression in vivo by MRI Gene therapy Application of molecular diagnostic methods in gene therapy Use of PCR to study biodistribution of gene therapy vector PCR for verification of the transcription of DNA In situ PCR for direct quantification of gene transfer into cells Detection of retroviruses by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR Confirmation of viral vector integration Monitoring of gene expression Monitoring of gene expression by green fluorescent protein Monitoring in vivo gene expression by molecular imaging Monoclonal antibodies Natalizumab 7. Monitoring of Drug Abuse Introduction Tests used for detection of drug abuse Forensic applications of detection of illicit drugs in fingerprints by MALDI MS MS for doping control Randox assays for DoA Drugs of Abuse Array V Urine drug testing TDM of drugs for treatment of substance abuse-related disorders Drug testing to monitor treatment of drug abuse Minimum requirement for drug testing in patients Analgesic abuse ?-blockers as doping agents Detection of ß-blockers in urine Chronic alcohol abuse Cocaine CEDIA for cocaine in human serum Detection of cocaine molecules by nanoparticle-labeled aptasensors Infrared spectroscopy for detection of cocaine in saliva Marijuana Use of marijuana and synthetic cannabinoids Detection of cannabinoids ELISA for detection of synthetic cannabinoids Drug abuse for performance enhancement in sports Historical aspects of drug abuse in sports Drugs used by athletes for performance enhancement Techniques used for detection of drug abuse by athletes Mass spectrometry for detection of peptide hormones miRNAs for the detection of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents Detection of anabolic steroids Body fluids and tissues used for detection of drug abuse in sports Urine drug testing Spray (sweat) drug test kits Hair drug testing Gene doping in sports Gene transfer methods used for enhancing physical performance Misuse of cell therapy in sport Challenges of detecting genetic manipulations in athletes Drug abuse testing in race horses Limitations and future prospects Role of pharmaceutical industry in anti-doping testing 8. Markets for TDM Introduction Methods for market estimation and future forecasts Markets for TDM tests Markets for TDM and DoA testing equipment Geographical distribution of markets for TDM tests Drivers for growth of TDM markets Markets for DoA testing Unmet needs in TDM Cost-benefit studies Simplifying assays and reducing time and cost Strategies for developing markets Physician education Supporting research on TDM Biomarker patents for drug monitoring 9. Companies Profiles of companies Collaborations 10. References For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/g4tq2x/therapeutic_drug


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.spie.org

A multiple-cation engineering strategy is used to realize devices with open-circuit voltages that are close to the thermodynamic limit, as well as high electroluminscence and stability at elevated temperatures. Perovskites have emerged as an attractive low-cost option for high-efficiency photovoltaic (PV) materials, which have certified power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) that approach those of established technologies (up to 22.1%).1 The perovskites that are used for such PVs generally have an ABX structure, i.e., where the cation A is methylammonium (MA), formamidinium (FA), or cesium (Cs), the metal B is lead (Pb) or tin, and the halide X is either chlorine, bromine, or iodine (I). Single-cation perovskites, however, often suffer from phase, temperature, or humidity instabilities, and poor reproducibility. These problems are particularly noteworthy for the perovskites CsPbX and FAPbX , which are only stable at room temperature as photoinactive (‘yellow’) phases rather than as more-desirable photoactive (‘black’) phases (stable at higher temperatures). In addition to achieving phase stability, it is also necessary to operate perovskite solar cells (PSCs) at elevated temperatures (i.e., of more than 85°C) to surpass current industrial norms. In recent work, double-cation perovskites (which include MA and FA, or Cs and FA) were shown to be stable as a black phase at room temperature.2–4 These materials also exhibit unexpected and novel properties. For example, Cs–FA mixtures suppress halide segregation and thus enable suitable band gaps for perovskite/silicon or perovskite/perovskite tandem PVs.5 In general, it has been found that by adding more components to the perovskite, their entropy is increased and unstable materials can thus be stabilized. For instance, the yellow phase of FAPbI can be avoided by using (also unstable) CsPbI . In our work we have thus developed this cation-mixing approach further, to investigate triple-cation (containing Cs, MA, and FA) perovskites.6 For example, we show the tolerance factor (t)—a geometric measure for the distortion of a perovskite—for various APbI perovskites in Figure 1. In particular, we focus on alkali-metal cations because they are stable to oxidation. So-called ‘established’ perovskites (i.e., containing Cs, MA, or FA)—with t between 0.8 and 1.0—exhibit the photoactive black phase at room temperature, and are thus used for high-efficiency PSCs.7, 8 In contrast, perovskites with lower t (i.e., containing lithium, sodium, or potassium) have non-photoactive yellow phases. Our tolerance factor calculations also show that rubidium (Rb) is very close to the yellow/black phase threshold (although seemingly too small) and is thus a good candidate for integration into the perovskite lattice. We have therefore used a general multiple-cation engineering strategy to integrate Rb (which never exhibits a black phase when used in a single-cation perovskite) and to study novel multication perovskites.7 Figure 1. (A) Tolerance factor (t) of different APbI -structure perovskites, where Pb is lead, I is iodine, and A is an oxidation-stable cation, i.e., lithium (Li), sodium (Na), potassium (K), rubidium (Rb), cesium (Cs), methylammonium (MA), or formamidinium (FA). Perovskites with t between 0.8 and 1.0 exhibit a photoactive ‘black’ phase (solid circles), whereas those with lower t have non-photoactive ‘yellow’ phases (open circles). The t of Rb is very close to the 0.8 threshold and is thus a good candidate for integration into the perovskite lattice. (B) Photographs of CsPBI (top) and RbPbI (bottom) perovskites at 28, 380, and 460°C. Irreversible melting for both compounds occurs at 460°C, and RbPbI never exhibits a black phase. (A) Tolerance factor (t) of different APbI-structure perovskites, where Pb is lead, I is iodine, and A is an oxidation-stable cation, i.e., lithium (Li), sodium (Na), potassium (K), rubidium (Rb), cesium (Cs), methylammonium (MA), or formamidinium (FA). Perovskites with t between 0.8 and 1.0 exhibit a photoactive ‘black’ phase (solid circles), whereas those with lower t have non-photoactive ‘yellow’ phases (open circles). The t of Rb is very close to the 0.8 threshold and is thus a good candidate for integration into the perovskite lattice. (B) Photographs of CsPBI(top) and RbPbI(bottom) perovskites at 28, 380, and 460°C. Irreversible melting for both compounds occurs at 460°C, and RbPbInever exhibits a black phase. 7 We have also recently demonstrated very high performance (i.e., excellent PCEs) for MAFA double-cation perovskites.1 From our x-ray diffraction analyses of such MAFA compounds, however, we found that they still contained detrimental, photoinactive yellow phase impurities: see Figure 2(a). Such impurities are one of the reasons for the unreproducible behavior of these perovskites. We thus added Cs to the compounds—to create a triple-cation perovskite—and achieved a substantially suppressed yellow phase (because of better-matched t values). With our triple-cation perovskites—see Figure 2(b)—we can obtain stabilized PCEs of 21.1% and improved reproducibility.6 Figure 2. (a) X-ray diffraction spectra for a MAFA double-cation perovskite and a CsMAFA triple-cation perovskite. The yellow phase impurities, at a measured angle of diffraction (2θ) of 11.6°, in the MAFA spectrum disappear upon addition of Cs. (b) Statistics for 40 MAFA and 98 CsMAFA perovskite photovoltaic devices. All device parameters—i.e., open-circuit voltage (V ), short-circuit current density (J ), fill factor, and power conversion efficiency (PCE)—as well as the standard deviation (a metric of the reproducibility) are improved upon addition of Cs. Twenty different devices have a PCE of more than 20%. (a) X-ray diffraction spectra for a MAFA double-cation perovskite and a CsMAFA triple-cation perovskite. The yellow phase impurities, at a measured angle of diffraction (2θ) of 11.6°, in the MAFA spectrum disappear upon addition of Cs. (b) Statistics for 40 MAFA and 98 CsMAFA perovskite photovoltaic devices. All device parameters—i.e., open-circuit voltage (V), short-circuit current density (J), fill factor, and power conversion efficiency (PCE)—as well as the standard deviation (a metric of the reproducibility) are improved upon addition of Cs. Twenty different devices have a PCE of more than 20%. 6 In the next stage of our work we added Rb to our single, double, and triple-cation perovskites, and thus doubled the number of available compositions. Specifically, we investigated the novel compositions of RbFA, RbCsFA, RbMAFA, and RbCsMAFA. Our results show that the quadruple-cation RbCsMAFA perovskite—see Figure 3(a)—yielded the best performance (i.e., with a stabilized PCE of 21.6%). For this device we also measured an open-circuit voltage of 1250mV, at a band gap of 1630mV, and a loss-in-potential (the difference between the band gap and open-circuit voltage) of 390mV. This is among the lowest values for any PV materials yet measured and indicates that it is a nearly recombination-free material. We are thus able to operate a solar cell made from this material as an LED, even at ambient conditions: see Figure 3(b). We have also demonstrated—see inset to Figure 3(a)—that polymer-coated multication PSCs can be operated at elevated temperatures (more than 85°C) to achieve full illumination and load for 500 hours (i.e., exceeding industrial requirements). Figure 3. (a) Current density–voltage curve for the best-performing Rb-containing solar cell (i.e., a RbCsMAFA device), with a stabilized PCE of 21.6%. Inset: Thermal stability of a polymer-coated perovskite solar cell that has an efficiency of more than 17%. This device was aged for 500 hours at 85°C, under continuous illumination and maximum power point tracking conditions, in nitrogen atmosphere (red curve). The cell retained 95% of its initial performance, as indicated by the dashed gray line, which is normalized (norm) to the aged result. (a) Current density–voltage curve for the best-performing Rb-containing solar cell (i.e., a RbCsMAFA device), with a stabilized PCE of 21.6%. Inset: Thermal stability of a polymer-coated perovskite solar cell that has an efficiency of more than 17%. This device was aged for 500 hours at 85°C, under continuous illumination and maximum power point tracking conditions, in nitrogen atmosphere (red curve). The cell retained 95% of its initial performance, as indicated by the dashed gray line, which is normalized (norm) to the aged result. 7 (b) Photograph of a RbCsMAFA solar cell (mounted in a custom-made device holder) operated as an LED, with temperature and ambient-gas control. A bright emission at 1.63eV is visible even under ambient room-light conditions. In summary, we have investigated a multiple-cation (i.e., triple and quadruple) approach to achieve stable perovskite materials for efficient solar cells. We have also successfully integrated Rb (normally considered too small for these materials) as a cation into such perovskites. Our multication perovskites are thus essential for achieving robust and reproducible solar cells, i.e., which are less prone to phase, temperature, and humiditiy instabilities than single-cation perovskites. In addition, we have demonstrated that polymer-coated PSCs can withstand stress tests that are harsher than industrial norms (i.e., heating at 85°C, under full illumination and load conditions, for 500 hours), which is a crucial step toward the industrialization of perovskite materials. In the next stages of our work we need to thoroughly investigate our newly established compositions. This work will include an assessment of viability toward upscaling, as well as further stability testing (e.g., cycling of temperature, humidity, and sealing). Michael Saliba acknowledges support from a Marie Skaaaodowska Curie fellowship and a H2020 grant agreement (66566). He is also grateful to his colleagues at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne's Laboratory for Photonics and Interfaces and the Laboratory of Photomolecular Science for fruitful collaborations. In particular, he thanks Michael Grätzel and Anders Hagfeldt for their support. École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Michael Saliba is a Marie Curie Fellow at EPFL, where he works with the Grätzel and Hagfeldt group. He completed his PhD at Oxford University, UK, in 2014 as part of Henry Snaith's group. His research is generally focused on optoelectronic properties of emerging photovoltaic technologies, with an emphasis on PSCs. 3. N. J. Jeon, J. H. Noh, W. S. Yang, Y. C. Kim, S. Ryu, J. Seo, S. I. Seok, Compositional engineering of perovskite materials for high-performance solar cells, Nature 517, p. 476-480, 2015. 4. J.-W. Lee, D.-H. Kim, H.-S. Kim, S.-W. Seo, S. M. Cho, N.-G. Park, Formamidinium and cesium hybridization for photo- and moisture-stable perovskite solar cell, Adv. Energy Mater. 5, 2015. doi:10.1002/aenm.201501310 7. M. Saliba, T. Matsui, K. Domanski, J.-Y. Seo, A. Ummadisingu, S. M. Zakeeruddin, J.-P. Correa-Baena, et al., Incorporation of rubidium cations into perovskite solar cells improves photovoltaic performance, Science 354, p. 206-209, 2016. 8. G. Kieslich, S. Sun, A. K. Cheetham, Solid-state principles applied to organic-inorganic perovskites: new tricks for an old dog, Chem. Sci. 5, p. 4712-4715, 2014.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

WILMINGTON, Ohio--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Air Transport Services Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:ATSG) today announced that it will host an investor conference call on Tuesday, March 7, 2017, at 10 a.m. Eastern time to review its financial results for the fourth quarter and fiscal year ended December 31, 2016. ATSG will release its fourth quarter and fiscal 2016 results on Monday, March 6, 2017, after the stock market closes. On the day of the conference call, participants should dial (888) 771-4371 and international participants should dial (847) 585-4405 ten minutes before the scheduled start of the call and ask for conference pass code 44441547. The call will also be webcast live (listen-only mode). A replay of the conference call will be available by phone on Tuesday, March 7, 2017, beginning at 1 p.m. EST and continuing through March 14, 2017, at (888) 843-7419 (international callers (630) 652-3042); use pass code 44441547#. The webcast replay also will remain available at the same link for 30 days. ATSG is a leading provider of aircraft leasing and air cargo transportation and related services to domestic and foreign air carriers and other companies that outsource their air cargo lift requirements. ATSG, through its leasing and airline subsidiaries, is the world's largest owner and operator of converted Boeing 767 freighter aircraft. Through its principal subsidiaries, including two airlines with separate and distinct U.S. FAA Part 121 Air Carrier certificates, ATSG provides aircraft leasing, air cargo lift, aircraft maintenance services and airport ground services. ATSG's subsidiaries include ABX Air, Inc.; Airborne Global Solutions, Inc.; Air Transport International, Inc.; Cargo Aircraft Management, Inc.; Airborne Maintenance and Engineering Services, Inc. and PEMCO World Air Services. For more information, please see www.atsginc.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

All amounts expressed in U.S. dollars Barrick Gold Corporation (NYSE:ABX)(TSX:ABX) ("Barrick" or the "Company") today announced the Board of Directors has approved an increase in the Company's quarterly dividend from $0.02 cents per share to $0.03 per share. Our capital allocation goals over the past two years have centered on restoring our balance sheet to withstand gold price volatility, investing to improve the quality of our asset base, and rewarding our shareholders with a reliable dividend. Since the end of 2014, we have reduced our total debt by 40 percent, and in 2017 we are increasing our investments in exploration and projects that have the potential to grow free cash flow per share over the long term. Reflecting this progress, we are increasing returns to our owners through an increase in our quarterly dividend. The quarterly dividend is payable on March 15, 2017, to shareholders of record at the close of business on February 28, 2017.1 1 The declaration and payment of dividends is at the discretion of the Board of Directors, and will depend on the Company's financial results, cash requirements, future prospects, and other factors deemed relevant by the Board. Certain information contained in this press release, including any information as to our strategy, projects, plans, or future financial or operating performance, constitutes "forward-looking statements". All statements, other than statements of historical fact, are forward-looking statements. The word "potential" and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. In particular, this press release contains forward-looking statements including, without limitation, with respect to cash flow forecasts and projected capital, operating, and exploration expenditures. Forward-looking statements are necessarily based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that, while considered reasonable by the Company as at the date of this press release in light of management's experience and perception of current conditions and expected developments, are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies. Known and unknown factors could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements, and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements and information. Such factors include, but are not limited to: fluctuations in the spot and forward price of gold, copper, or certain other commodities (such as silver, diesel fuel, natural gas, and electricity); failure to comply with environmental and health and safety laws and regulations; timing of receipt of, or failure to comply with, necessary permits and approvals; the impact of global liquidity and credit availability on the timing of cash flows and the values of assets and liabilities based on projected future cash flows; fluctuations in the currency markets; changes in U.S. dollar interest rates; changes in national and local government legislation, taxation, controls or regulations, and/or changes in the administration of laws, policies, and practices, expropriation or nationalization of property and political or economic developments in Canada, the United States, and other jurisdictions in which the Company does or may carry on business in the future; damage to the Company's reputation due to the actual or perceived occurrence of any number of events, including negative publicity with respect to the Company's handling of environmental matters or dealings with community groups, whether true or not; risk of loss due to acts of war, terrorism, sabotage, and civil disturbances; litigation; contests over title to properties, particularly title to undeveloped properties, or over access to water, power and other required infrastructure; business opportunities that may be presented to, or pursued by, the Company; our ability to successfully integrate acquisitions or complete divestitures; risks associated with working with partners in jointly controlled assets; employee relations including loss of key employees; increased costs and physical risks, including extreme weather events and resource shortage, related to climate change; availability and increased costs associated with mining inputs and labor. In addition, there are risks and hazards associated with the business of mineral exploration, development and mining, including environmental hazards, industrial accidents, unusual or unexpected formations, pressures, cave-ins, flooding and gold bullion, copper cathode or gold or copper concentrate losses (and the risk of inadequate insurance, or inability to obtain insurance, to cover these risks). Many of these uncertainties and contingencies can affect our actual results and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements made by, or on behalf of, us. Readers are cautioned that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. All of the forward-looking statements made in this press release are qualified by these cautionary statements. Specific reference is made to the most recent Form 40-F/Annual Information Form on file with the SEC and Canadian provincial securities regulatory authorities for a more detailed discussion of some of the factors underlying forward-looking statements and the risks that may affect Barrick's ability to achieve the expectations set forth in the forward looking statements contained in this press release. The Company disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by applicable law.

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