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Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Randeree K.,University of Oxford | Randeree K.,The British University in Dubai | Al Rashdi H.R.,Abu Dhabi Education Council
Ubiquitous Learning | Year: 2010

Since the dawn of early human civilization, new found tools and technology were constantly being used and innovated in the quest for propagating and preserving knowledge and to improve the overall edification process of society. The use of sticks being used as pens on sand, gave way to colored stones and dyes used on cave walls and cliffs and, soon after, leather to write and to write on. Later, as technology improved in the middle ages, man started using quills and liquid ink leading to fountain and ball-point pens by the Twentieth century. Film, television, projection and the recent addition of computer assisted education have all been important steps in this long saga of integrating technology in improving the propagation of knowledge. While Information Technology remains a relatively recent phenomenon, the promotion of educational reform resulting directly from classroom use of new tools and equipment has been around for more than a century. Efforts to reform education through computer infusion and the histories of deploying earlier audio-visual technologies such as film, radio and television have been applied in many parts of the world. "The question is no longer whether to use technology in education institutions but how to use technology to change practice to reach new goals-as a catalyst for change and as a tool in creating, implementing, managing and communicating a new conception of teaching and learning, as well as the system that supports it" (Cradler and Bridgforth, 1996). A close look at technologically leading nations clearly shows that Educational Technology (ET) is considered to be an indispensable part of the education delivery process. This paper aims to assess the present status of ET's implementation in schools, by analyzing the current requirement for ET, discussing the dichotomy between traditional education and ET, understanding the importance of funding for ET and detailing issues of timely and appropriate training and development for teaching staff. © Common Ground, Kasim Randeree, Hamad Rashed Al Rashdi, All Rights Reserved. Source


Kerkiz N.F.,Intel Corporation | Elchouemi A.,Abu Dhabi Education Council
Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Electronics, Circuits, and Systems | Year: 2013

Adaptive computing systems (ACSs) are flexible hardware accelerators for applications in domains such as image and digital signal processing. However, the mapping of applications onto ACSs using the traditional methods can take long time for a hardware engineer to develop and debug. A software design environment called CHAMPION was developed at the University of Tennessee to enable the automated mapping of applications onto ACSs. In this paper the compilation path of CHAMPION is described and a new recursive partitioning method based on topological ordering and levelization (RPL) is presented. The proposed method performs multi-FPGA partitioning by taking into account six different partitioning constraints. © 2013 IEEE. Source


Beg A.,United Arab Emirates University | Beg A.,Cortex Business Solutions | Elchouemi A.,Abu Dhabi Education Council
Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Electronics, Circuits, and Systems | Year: 2016

XOR gates are essential components of many logic circuits. With the aim of reducing energy dissipation, this paper proposes the use of genetic-algorithm-based optimization for XOR gates operating in the near-threshold region. We applied the proposed technique on four different types of XOR gates built using 22 nm devices. The resultant energy savings for the optimized gates ranged from 28% to 48% when compared with the traditionally-sized gates. The areas of the energy-optimized gates are also appreciably less than their conventional counterparts. The presented technique can be readily used for optimizing the gates for power, performance, noise-margin, etc. © 2015 IEEE. Source


Badri M.,Research Planning | Yang G.,Research Planning | Al Mazroui K.,United Arab Emirates University | Mohaidat J.,Abu Dhabi Education Council | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Biological Education | Year: 2016

This study employed the international Relevance of Science Education questionnaire to survey the interest in biology and the out-of-school experiences of Abu Dhabi secondary school students (median age 17, mean age 17.53 and mode age of 16) in the third semester of 2014. It included 3100 participants. An exploratory factor analysis was used to categorise the items for both interest in biology and out-of-school experience. Ten interest in biology and 12 out-of-school experience factors were extracted. The summated means for each factor indicated that ‘health and fitness’ and ‘disease control’ enjoyed highest interests among students. For out-of-school experiences, the two factors of ‘digital applications’ and ‘medical treatment’ received the highest scores. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that all factors for both interest in biology and out-of-school experience exhibited significant differences between boys and girls. More girls than boys were interested in disease control, reproduction (human biology), alternative science, health and fitness, zoology, and applied cosmetic biology. No significant differences were observed for the remaining five other categories. Furthermore, analysis of variance revealed significant differences between boys and girls with regard to individual items comprising each of the factors. The highest correlations were between the two factors of out-of-school experiences of ‘the natural world’ and ‘learning through observation’ and the interest in biology factor related to ‘plant and animal farming and agriculture’. Results suggested that more emphasis must be placed on students’ out-of-school experience and their engagement in informal learning in contextual outdoor environments to enhance their interest in learning more about biology and the living environment in general. © 2016 Royal Society of Biology Source


Badri M.,Abu Dhabi Education Council | Mazroui K.A.,Abu Dhabi Education Council | Al Rashedi A.,Abu Dhabi Education Council | Yang G.,Abu Dhabi Education Council
Journal of Science Education and Technology | Year: 2015

Abu Dhabi high school students’ interest in physics in different contexts was investigated with a survey conducted in connection with the international project, The Relevance of Science Education (ROSE). The sample consisted of 2248 students in public and private schools. Means of most items that belong to the school physics context for both girls and boys were below the score of (3.0). The most interesting topics for both genders were connected with fantasy items. The least interesting items (particularly for girls) were connected with artifacts and technological processes. Girls assigned the highest scores for “why we dream” and “life and death.” Boys assigned the highest scores for “inventions and discoveries” and “life outside of earth.” The main message of the study is that new curricular approaches and textbooks can be developed through combining technological and human contexts. The implications for curriculum development, teacher professional development programs, and other education strategies in Abu Dhabi are discussed in light of the ROSE survey. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York Source

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