Absorption Systems LP

Exton, PA, United States

Absorption Systems LP

Exton, PA, United States

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Devalapally H.,Absorption Systems LP | Li L.,Absorption Systems LP | Perdue M.L.,FluSolutions Consulting LLC | Ostrander G.K.,Florida State University
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

We have demonstrated that simple formulations composed of the parent drug in combination with generally regarded as safe (GRAS) permeability enhancers are capable of dramatically increasing the absolute bioavailability of zanamivir. This has the advantage of not requiring modification of the drug structure to promote absorption, thus reducing the regulatory challenges involved in conversion of an inhaled to oral route of administration of an approved drug. Absolute bioavailability increases of up to 24-fold were observed when Capmul MCM L8 (composed of mono- and diglycerides of caprylic/capric acids in glycerol) was mixed with 1.5 mg of zanamivir and administered intraduodenally to rats. Rapid uptake (tmax of 5 min) and a Cmax of over 7200 ng/mL was achieved. Variation of the drug load or amount of enhancer demonstrated a generally linear variation in absorption, indicating an ability to optimize a formulation for a desired outcome such as a targeted Cmax for enzyme saturation. No absorption enhancement was observed when the enhancer was given 2 hr prior to drug administration, indicating, in combination with the observed tmax, that absorption enhancement is temporary. This property is significant and aligns well with therapeutic applications to limit undesirable drug-drug interactions, potentially due to the presence of other poorly absorbed polar drugs. These results suggest that optimal human oral dosage forms of zanamivir should be enteric-coated gelcaps or softgels for intraduodenal release. There continues to be a strong need and market for multiple neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza treatment. Creation of orally available formulations of inhibitor drugs that are currently administered intravenously or by inhalation would provide a significant improvement in treatment of influenza. The very simple GRAS formulation components and anticipated dosage forms would require low manufacturing costs and yield enhanced convenience. These results are being utilized to design prototype dosage forms for initial human pharmacokinetic studies. © 2013 Holmes et al.


PubMed | U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention, Pfizer, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Glaxosmithkline and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Pharmaceutical research | Year: 2015

Currently, the FDA allows biowaivers for Class I (high solubility and high permeability) and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Scientific evidence should be provided to support biowaivers for BCS Class I and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds.Data on the effects of excipients on drug permeability are needed to demonstrate that commonly used excipients do not affect the permeability of BCS Class III compounds, which would support the application of biowaivers to Class III compounds. This study was designed to generate such data by assessing the permeability of four BCS Class III compounds and one Class I compound in the presence and absence of five commonly used excipients.The permeability of each of the compounds was assessed, at three to five concentrations, with each excipient in two different models: Caco-2 cell monolayers, and in situ rat intestinal perfusion. No substantial increases in the permeability of any of the compounds were observed in the presence of any of the tested excipients in either of the models, with the exception of disruption of Caco-2 cell monolayer integrity by sodium lauryl sulfate at 0.1 mg/ml and higher.The results suggest that the absorption of these four BCS Class III compounds would not be greatly affected by the tested excipients. This may have implications in supporting biowaivers for BCS Class III compounds in general.


Nagar S.,Temple University | Tucker J.,Temple University | Weiskircher E.A.,Absorption Systems L.P. | Bhoopathy S.,Absorption Systems L.P. | And 2 more authors.
Pharmaceutical Research | Year: 2014

Purpose: With the goal of quantifying P-gp transport kinetics, Part 1 of these manuscripts evaluates different compartmental models and Part 2 applies these models to kinetic data. Methods: Models were developed to simulate the effect of apical efflux transporters on intracellular concentrations of six drugs. The effect of experimental variability on model predictions was evaluated. Several models were evaluated, and characteristics including membrane configuration, lipid content, and apical surface area (asa) were varied. Results: Passive permeabilities from MDCK-MDR1 cells in the presence of cyclosporine gave lower model errors than from MDCK control cells. Consistent with the results in Part 2, model configuration had little impact on calculated model errors. The 5-compartment model was the simplest model that reproduced experimental lag times. Lipid content and asa had minimal effect on model errors, predicted lag times, and intracellular concentrations. Including endogenous basolateral uptake activity can decrease model errors. Models with and without explicit membrane barriers differed markedly in their predicted intracellular concentrations for basolateral drug exposure. Single point data resulted in clearances similar to time course data. Conclusions: Compartmental models are useful to evaluate the impact of efflux transporters on intracellular concentrations. Whereas a 3-compartment model may be sufficient to predict the impact of transporters that efflux drugs from the cell, a 5-compartment model with explicit membranes may be required to predict intracellular concentrations when efflux occurs from the membrane. More complex models including additional compartments may be unnecessary. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


PubMed | University of Toronto and Absorption Systems LP
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biochemical and biophysical research communications | Year: 2016

OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 (1B3) are members of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), a family of sodium-independent organic anion membrane transporters that contribute to transport of various drugs. To identify peptide inhibitors of OATP1B1, we developed a direct selection system on live cells using phage-displayed peptide libraries. Selections against OATP1B1 overexpressed cell-lines yielded three unique peptides able to inhibit the transport function of OATP1B1 and 1B3. Affinity maturation of one peptide led to identification of two peptides that demonstrated improved inhibition efficacy on drug uptake mediated by OATP1B1 and 1B3. We anticipate that these peptides will assist the identification of novel substrates for OATP1B1 and 1B3. Moreover, our selection system is a practical method for generating inhibitors of other membrane transporters.


Wang X.,Absorption Systems LP | Black L.,Absorption Systems LP
International journal of pharmaceutical compounding | Year: 2013

This ex vivo human percutaneous absorption study evaluated a set of six model drugs (ketamine hydrochloride, bupivacaine hydrochloride, diclofenac sodium, gabapentin, orphenadrine citrate, pentoxifylline) from two popular formulations for topically applied compounding preparations. The compounded preparations used in this study were Versatile cream and a reference cream. Each formulation was applied to human trunk skin mounted on Franz Diffusion Cells, 50 mg/chamber (or 28.2 mg/cm2). Serial dermal receiver solutions were collected for 48 hours. Analysis of the resultant data supports the concept that the Versatile base formulation provides improved characteristics relative to the reference base. This is of key importance where the patient does not show clinical improvement when a conventional topical delivery vehicle is used in the formulation. From the results, it is reasonable to anticipate that, relative to the reference formulation, the Versatile formulation provides enhanced transdermal delivery of some analgesic medications.


PubMed | Absorption Systems LP
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: International journal of pharmaceutical compounding | Year: 2014

This ex vivo human percutaneous absorption study evaluated a set of six model drugs (ketamine hydrochloride, bupivacaine hydrochloride, diclofenac sodium, gabapentin, orphenadrine citrate, pentoxifylline) from two popular formulations for topically applied compounding preparations. The compounded preparations used in this study were Versatile cream and a reference cream. Each formulation was applied to human trunk skin mounted on Franz Diffusion Cells, 50 mg/chamber (or 28.2 mg/cm2). Serial dermal receiver solutions were collected for 48 hours. Analysis of the resultant data supports the concept that the Versatile base formulation provides improved characteristics relative to the reference base. This is of key importance where the patient does not show clinical improvement when a conventional topical delivery vehicle is used in the formulation. From the results, it is reasonable to anticipate that, relative to the reference formulation, the Versatile formulation provides enhanced transdermal delivery of some analgesic medications.


Bhoopathy S.,Absorption Systems LP | Bode C.,Absorption Systems LP | Naageshwaran V.,Absorption Systems LP | Weiskircher-Hildebrandt E.A.,Absorption Systems LP | Hidalgo I.J.,Absorption Systems LP
Methods in Molecular Biology | Year: 2014

Drug transporters are now universally acknowledged as important determinants of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of both endogenous and exogenous compounds. Altered transporter function, whether due to genetic polymorphism, DDIs, disease, or environmental factors such as dietary constituents, can result in changes in drug efficacy and/or toxicity due to changes in circulating or tissue levels of either drugs or endogenous substrates. Prediction of whether and to what extent the biological fate of a drug is influenced by drug transporters, therefore, requires in vitro test systems that can accurately predict the risk and magnitude of clinical DDIs. While these in vitro assessments appear simple in theory, practitioners recognize that there are multiple factors that can influence experimental outcomes. A better understanding of these variables, including test compound characteristics, test systems, assay formats, and experimental design will enable clear, actionable steps and translatable outcomes that may avoid unnecessary downstream clinical engagement. This chapter will delineate the role of these variables in improving in vitro assay outcomes. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2014.


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

EXTON, Pa., Nov. 21, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Absorption Systems, a world leader in novel test systems for drug transporters, announces the renewal of a technology licensing deal with Biogen. After years of contract testing by Absorption Systems using MDR1-MDCK cells, Biogen licensed the...


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

EXTON, Pa., Feb. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Absorption Systems, a global leader in nonclinical testing of drugs, biologics, and medical devices, is pleased to announce that its Chief Operating Officer, Sid Bhoopathy, Ph.D., has been selected as a winner of the 2017 Executive Management...


EXTON, Pa., Nov. 11, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Absorption Systems, a global leader in the science of translational medicine, announces the issuance of a U.S. patent for its unique In Vitro Dissolution Absorption System (IDAS2™) technology, which enables the simultaneous evaluation of drug...

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