Abia State Polytechnic

Aba, Nigeria

Abia State Polytechnic

Aba, Nigeria

Abia State Polytechnic is located in the heart of Abia State, Aba, Nigeria. It is composed of different schools, such as the School of Science & Engineering and the School of Business Administration.The color is Yellow and Dard Red.The Rector is Onukaogu Abalogun A. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Eleazu C.O.,Ebonyi State University | Eleazu K.C.,Ebonyi State UniversityAbakaliki Nigeria | Iroaganachi M.A.,Abia State Polytechnic | Kalu W.,Abia State University
Journal of Food Biochemistry | Year: 2017

This study reported for the first time, the starch digestibility and predicted glycemic indices (pGIs) of the flours from raw and processed (boiled and fried) S. rotundifolius tubers following standard techniques. The flours contained considerable amounts of proteins and starch. The fried tubers had higher fat contents compared with the raw or boiled while the ash contents of the processed tubers did not differ significantly from the raw. The boiled tubers had lower digestible starch (DS) and rapidly digestible starch (RDS) but statistically same amounts of amylose compared with the raw or fried tubers; higher amounts of resistant starch (RS) compared with the raw, fried and white bread, respectively. While RDS and DS were positively correlated with the pGIs of the tubers, RS was negatively correlated and RS formation during processing was evident only in the boiled tubers. The study showed that the raw and processed tubers possessed intermediate glycemic indices. Practical applications: There has been an upsurge in recent times on the interest in nutraceuticals, one of which reasons is attributed to their roles in arresting some metabolic disorders, one of which is type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes are often restrained to particular types of diets which results in their complaints of monotony of staying on a particular diet. S. rotundifolius tuber is one of such plants that have been found to possess nutraceutical potentials due to its nutritional and pharmacological properties as reported in several studies. However, the tuber is eaten after being processed and there is paucity of information in literature on the effect of processing on the digestibility of its starch. Therefore, the findings of this study which revealed that both the raw and processed S. rotundifolius tubers possessed intermediate glycemic indices indicate their usefulness as potential meals for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Iroaganachi M.,Abia State Polytechnic | Eleazu C.O.,National Root Crops Research Institute | Okafor P.N.,Michael Okpara University of Agriculture | Nwaohu N.,National Root Crops Research Institute
Open Biochemistry Journal | Year: 2015

Objective: To determine the effect of unripe plantain (Musa paradisiaca) and ginger (Zingiber officinale) on blood glucose (BG), feed intake (FI) and weight of streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Methods. Twenty four male albino rats were used and were divided into 4 groups of 6 rats each. Group 1 (non-diabetic) and Group 2 (diabetic) received standard rat feed; Group 3 received unripe plantain incorporated feed (810 /kg body weight) and Group 4 received unripe plantain+ginger incorporated feed (710:100 g/kg body weight). The weights and FI of the rats were measured daily throughout the experimentation. Results. Groups 3 and 4 rats had 159.52% and 71.83% decreases in BG but 24.91% and 35.32% decreases in weights compared with groups 1 and 2 rats that had 2.09% and 22.94% increases in BG with 13.42% increase and 45.36% decrease in weights respectively. The FI of the experimental rats did not differ significantly from each other (P>0.05) at the end of experimentation. The standard rat feed contained higher amounts of Ca but lower amounts of Mg and Fe compared with the unripe plantain and unripe plantain+ginger incorporated feeds. Conclusion. Combination of unripe plantain and ginger at the dose used in the management of diabetes was not very effective compared with unripe plantain alone. © Iroaganachi et al.


Eleazu C.O.,National Root Crops Research Institute | Iroaganachi M.,Abia State Polytechnic | Eleazu K.C.,Michael Okpara University of Agriculture
Journal of Diabetes Research | Year: 2013

Aim. To investigate the ameliorating potentials of cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta L.) and unripe plantain (Musa paradisiaca L.) incorporated feeds on the renal and liver growths of diabetic rats, induced with 55 and 65 mg/kg body weight of Streptozotocin. Method. The blood glucose level of the rats was measured with a glucometer, the protein and glucose and specific gravity (SPGR) in the urine samples of the rats were measured using urine assay strips and urinometer respectively. The chemical composition and antioxidant screening of the test feeds were carried out using standard techniques. Results. Administration of the test feeds for 21 days to the diabetic rats of groups 4 and 5, resulted in 58.75% and 38.13% decreases in hyperglycemia and amelioration of their elevated urinary protein, glucose, SPGR, and relative kidney weights. The diabetic rats administered cocoyam incorporated feeds, had 2.71% and 19.52% increases in weight and growth rates, the diabetic rats administered unripe plantain incorporated feeds had 5.12% and 29.52% decreases in weight and growth rates while the diabetic control rats had 28.69%, 29.46%, 248.9% and 250.14% decreases in weights and growth rates. The cocoyam incorporated feeds contained higher antioxidants, minerals and phytochemicals except alkaloids than unripe plantain feed. Conclusion. Cocoyam and unripe plantain could be useful in the management of diabetic nephropathy. © 2013 C. O. Eleazu et al.


Eleazu C.O.,National Root Crops Research Institute | Eleazu K.C.,Abia State Specialist and Diagnostic Center | Ironkwe A.,National Root Crops Research Institute | Iroaganachi M.A.,Abia State Polytechnic
Diabetes and Metabolism Journal | Year: 2014

Background: The effect of livingstone potato (Plectranthus esculenthus N.E.Br) on diabetes and its complications in Streptozotocin induced diabetic rats was investigated. The duration of the experiment was 4 weeks. Methods: The blood glucose level of the rats was measured with a glucometer, the protein and glucose and specific gravity in the urine samples of the rats were measured using urine assay strips and urinometer respectively. The liver and kidney function parameters in the serum of the rats were determined using Biosystem Kits. Results: The diabetic rats given livingstonepotato incorporated feeds, had 129.7% decrease in their hyperglycemia with corresponding amelioration of their elevated urinary protein, sugars, specific gravity, renal growth, liver growth as well as 15.64% decrease in body weights compared with the nondiabetic rats that had 5.54% decrease in blood glucose and 20.39% increase in body weight unlike the diabetic control rats that had 18.34% decrease in blood glucose and 52.68% decrease in body weight. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the relative liver, pancreas, and kidney weights of the diabetic rats given livingstone potato feeds compared with the diabetic control while there were no significant differences (P>0.05) in the relative heart weights of all the rats in the three different groups. In terms of liver and kidney function parameters, values obtained for the diabetic rats given livingstone potato incorporated feeds were not significantly different from that of the nondiabetic rats except for total bilurubin, aspartate transaminase, and creatinine (P>0.05) while they were significantly different from the values obtained for the diabetic control rats (P<0.05). In addition, the serum amylase of the diabetic control rats were significantly higher (P<0.05) than that of the nondiabetic and diabetic rats treated with livingstone potato incorporated feeds. Conclusion: Results show the antidiabetic actions of livingstone potato and its ability to ameliorate glomerular complication and liver hypertrophy in diabetics. © 2014 Korean Diabetes Association.


Ugochukwu I.B.,Abia State Polytechnic | Chioma M.I.B.,Abia State Polytechnic
Procedia Engineering | Year: 2015

The rate of urbanization in Nigeria has witnessed tremendous increase in the last five decades. Census in the early Fifties showed that there were about 56 cities in the country and about 10.6 percent of the total population lived in these cities. This rose dramatically to 19.1 percent in 1963 and 24.5 percent in 1985. Today, the national population is estimated to be about 160 million with the urban population constituting about 60 percent. The phenomenal rise in population, number and size of our cities over the past few years have manifested in the acute shortage of dwelling units which resulted in overcrowding, high rents, poor urban living conditions, and low infrastructure services and indeed high crime rates. Various programs have been implemented to address housing problem. Despite all these interventions, Nigeria's housing problems still remain intractable. The paper recognizes that what Nigerians need to survive the wounds of near-homelessness include good governance, increased access to land, credit, affordable housing and environmentally sound and serviced human settlements. The paper examines the national housing need and housing provision, major constrain in delivery of low cost housing in Nigeria and conclude by recommending locally produced building materials and intermediate technology which can reduce construction cost by about 60 percent as an affordable strategy for construction of low cost housing in Nigeria. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.


Eleazu C.O.,National Root Crops Research Institute | Eleazu C.O.,Federal University, Ndufu-Alike | Eleazu K.C.,Ebonyi State University | Iroaganachi M.,Abia State Polytechnic
Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies | Year: 2016

The starch digestibility, α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory capacities of the flours from raw and processed (boiled and fried) tubers of three varieties (riyom, beebot and langaat) of P. esculenta were investigated using standard techniques. The range of the chemical constituents of the flours (expressed in g/100 g, dry weight) were: lipids (0.20 to 17.27), ash (1.26 to 2.87), proteins (7.55 to 11.60), total starch (47.18 to 64.70), digestible starch (39.34 to 59.48), resistant starch (RS) (3.06 to 7.84) and rapidly digestible starch (RDS) (16.89 to 30.67). White bread contained significantly higher TS, DS and RDS but lower RS than the flours. The IC50 values of the aqueous extracts of the flours ranged from 257.50 to 1515.94 μg/ml and 128.89 to 641.90 μg/ml for the α-amylase and α-glucosidase assays respectively. Frying of the P. esculenta tubers potentiates the activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes compared with the raw or boiled forms. Industrial relevance Interest in functional foods has increased in recent times due to their roles in ameliorating a lot of metabolic disorders, one of which is type 2 diabetes. Recent therapeutic targets for the control of postprandial hyperglycemia involve inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities that play key roles in the digestion of dietary carbohydrates. However, the undesirable side effects associated with the synthetic α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitors have led to increased search for these inhibitors from plant based foods. Livingstone potato is one of such plants that has captivated the interest of researchers due to their demonstrated pharmacological relevance. However, Livingstone potato tuber is usually eaten following processing and there are no reports on the effect of processing on its starch digestibility. Therefore, the findings of this study which showed that methanol extracts of the tubers showed stronger α-glucosidase inhibition than α-amylase inhibition could particularly be of interest to the health care and nutraceutical industries as exploitation of this finding could circumvent the adverse side effects associated with synthetic antidiabetic drugs. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd


Iroaganachi M.,Abia State Polytechnic | Eleazu C.,University of Nigeria
Journal of the Pancreas | Year: 2015

Context Although unripe plantain (Musa paradisiaca) and ginger (Zingiber officinale) are used as single plants to manage diabetes mellitus in Nigeria, the possibility of combining them in a typical diabetic diet and the glycemic response elicited as a result of such combination has not been investigated. Objective To determine the effect of unripe plantain and ginger on serum total proteins, albumin, creatinine and urea levels of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Methods Twenty four male albino rats were used and were divided into 4 groups of 6 rats each. Group 1 (non-diabetic) received standard rat feeds; Group 2 (diabetic) received standard rat feeds; Group 3 received unripe plantain pellets and Group 4 received unripe plantain+ginger pellets. Results There were significant increases (P=0.045) of both serum urea and creatinine, but significant decreases (P=0.045) of both serum total protein and albumin levels, in Group 2 rats compared with Group 1. There were significant decreases (P=0.033) of both serum urea and creatinine levels of Group 3 and 4 rats compared with Group 2. In addition, there were significant increases of both serum total protein and albumin levels (P=0.033) in Group 3 rats compared with Group 2, but the comparison of serum total protein and albumin levels between Group 4 and Group 2 did not reach the significant level (P=0.056 and P=0.065 for serum total protein and albumin levels, respectively. Conclusion Combination of unripe plantain and ginger at the ratio used in the management of renal dysfunction in diabetics was not very effective compared with unripe plantain alone. © 2015, JOP. J Pancreas (Online). All rights reserved.


Eleazu C.O.,National Root Crops Research Institute | Eleazu K.C.,Abia State Specialist and Diagnostic Center | Iroaganachi M.A.,Abia State Polytechnic
Pharmaceutical Biology | Year: 2016

Context: The possibility of combining unripe plantain [Musa paradisiacae Linn (Plantaginaceae)] and cocoyam [Colocassia esculenta Linn (Araceae)] in the management of diabetes has not been investigated. Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic actions of unripe plantain and cocoyam. Materials and methods: Diabetes was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (65 mg/kg body weight). Twelve days after STZ induction, respective groups of diabetic rats were fed cocoyam (810 g/kg), unripe plantain (810 g/kg), and unripe plantain + cocoyam (405:405 g/kg) for 28 d. Body weights, feed intake, biochemical parameters, namely serum glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), atherogenic index, coronary risk index, triacylglycerol, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), hepatic isocitrate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase of the rats and phytochemical composition of the test and standard rat feeds were measured. Results and discussion: Cocoyam or unripe plantain alone significantly (p < 0.05) ameliorated the body weights (18.89 and 19.95% decreases, respectively) and biochemical parameters as compared with those of STZ controls (31.21% decrease). While combination of cocoyam and unripe plantain significantly (p < 0.05) ameliorated the biochemical parameters of the rats (except HbA1C), it did not ameliorate their body weights (28.53% decrease). The feed intake of the experimental rats did not differ from each other (p > 0.05) at the end of experimentation and the feed samples contained considerable amounts of saponins, alkaloids, flavonoids, and tannins. Conclusion: Cocoyam or unripe plantain alone showed better antihyperglycemic and anihyperlipidemic action than their combination. © 2015 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc. All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.


PubMed | Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State University and Abia State Polytechnic
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of traditional and complementary medicine | Year: 2016

Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are involved in deleterious/beneficial biological processes. The present study sought to investigate the capacity of single and combinatorial herbal formulations of Acanthus montanus, Emilia coccinea, Hibiscus rosasinensis, and Asystasia gangetica to act as superoxide radicals (SOR), hydrogen peroxide (HP), nitric oxide radical (NOR), hydroxyl radical (HR), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical antagonists using invitro models. The herbal extracts were single herbal formulations (SHfs), double herbal formulations (DHfs), triple herbal formulations (THfs), and a quadruple herbal formulation (QHf). The phytochemical composition and radical scavenging capacity index (SCI) of the herbal formulations were measured using standard methods. The flavonoids were the most abundant phytochemicals present in the herbal extracts. The SCI50 defined the concentration (g/mL) of herbal formulation required to scavenge 50% of the investigated radicals. The SHfs, DHfs, THfs, and QHf SCI50 against the radicals followed the order HR>SOR>DPPH radical>HP>NOR. Although the various herbal formulations exhibited ambivalent antioxidant activities in terms of their radical scavenging capabilities, a broad survey of the results of the present study showed that combinatorial herbal formulations (DHfs, THfs, and QHf) appeared to exhibit lower radical scavenging capacities than those of the SHfs invitro.


PubMed | Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State University and Abia State Polytechnic
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of traditional and complementary medicine | Year: 2016

The current study sought to investigate the capacities of single and combinatorial herbal formulations of leaf extracts of Acanthus montanus, Asystasia gangetica, Emilia coccinea, and Hibiscus rosasinensis to reverse hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in alloxan-induced diabetic male rats. Phytochemical composition of the herbal extracts, fasting plasma glucose concentration (FPGC), and serum lipid profile (SLP) of the rats were measured by standard methods. The relative abundance of phytochemicals in the four experimental leaf extracts was in the following order: flavonoids>alkaloids>saponins>tannins. Hyperglycemic rats (HyGR) treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations showed evidence of reduced FPGC compared with the untreated HyGR and were normoglycemic (FPGC<110.0mg/dL). Similarly, HyGR treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations showed evidence of readjustments in their SLPs. Generally, HyGR treated with triple herbal formulations (THfs) exhibited the highest atherogenic index compared with HyGR treated with single herbal formulations (SHfs), double herbal formulations (DHfs), and quadruple herbal formulation (QHf). The display of synergy or antagonism by the composite herbal extracts in ameliorating hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia depended on the type and number of individual herbal extract used in constituting the experimental herbal formulations. Furthermore, the capacities of the herbal formulations (SHfs, DHfs, THfs, and QHf) to exert glycemic control and reverse dyslipidemia did not follow predictable patterns in the animal models.

Loading Abia State Polytechnic collaborators
Loading Abia State Polytechnic collaborators