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ABI Research is a market research and market intelligence firm based in New York. The company was formed in 1990 and incorporated in 1991 by Tim Archdeacon as Allied Business Intelligence, Inc. The organization provides research on the following areas: IoE, Enterprise and M2M Wearables & Devices Cloud Content & OTT Video Delivery Next Generation Network Services Network Densification and Infrastructure Connected Home Autonomous Driving & Location Tech Digital Security Semiconductors Robotics TeardownsABI Research maintains offices in Oyster Bay, New York; New York, NY; Austin, TX; Scottsdale, AZ; Bend, OR; Wellingborough; London; Geneva; and Singapore. Wikipedia.


« CMU study shows autonomous vehicle algorithms can have considerable effect on fuel economy; need for new approaches in testing | Main | SLAC, U Toronto team develops new highly efficient ternary OER catalyst for water-splitting using earth-abundant metals; >3x TOF prior record-holder » ABI Research has defined six transformative paradigms for the automotive industry over the next 25 years: the software-defined car; sensors and big data; the connected car; cooperative mobility and the IoT; electrification; and car sharing/driverless cars. While the first three phases are already underway, the latter three will start to drive the market forward within the next 10 years, according to the market research firm. Car manufacturers are currently revamping vehicles’ electronics and networking architecture to ensure every sub-system is connected and software-defined. Moving toward the next decade, the automotive industry will achieve cooperative mobility. Cars will communicate with not only each other but also infrastructures and environments. Electrification will then change the way consumers power their vehicles. And, lastly, car sharing and driverless cars will likely lead to market consolidation. The final three stages—cooperative mobility, electrification, and car sharing leading to driverless cars—will be the most disruptive to the automotive industry. Not all car manufacturers will survive the changing landscape. And newcomers will also emerge, ones eager to create new, software-defined, high-tech cars. Through this industry fluctuation, there will be a number of opportunities for manufacturers and vendors to reinvent themselves, ABI said. These findings are part of ABI Research’s Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving Service, which includes research reports, market data, insights, and competitive assessments.


News Article
Site: http://www.greencarcongress.com/

« GKN Driveline introducing eAxle for mass-market C-segment vehicles | Main | ABI Research forecasts 400M people to rely on robotic car sharing by 2030 » The refreshed Toyota 2017 Highlander mid-size sport utility vehicle will feature a new Direct Shift 8-speed (8AT automatic transmission), as well as two new grades for the hybrid version of the model. The third-generation model, now entering its fourth year, offers room for up to eight, a choice of three powertrains and six model grades, including a new sporty SE model. The Highlander Hybrid adds two new grades, (LE and XLE) to its existing lineup of Limited and Platinum models for a total of four. All Highlander Hybrid models will continue to be all-wheel drive (AWD). The six Highlander gas models will continue to be (LE, LE Plus, XLE, SE, Limited and Limited Platinum) available in both front-wheel and AWD. Performance will be enhanced in the 2017 Highlander gas models with the addition of the new Direct Shift 8AT (automatic transmission) that will be paired with a new 3.5-liter V6 Direct Injection Engine. The new transmission is more compact and will provide more transmission efficiency through its 8-speed gear range. The 8AT (Automatic Transmission) will be standard on all V6 Highlander gas models. The new 3.5-liter Direct Injection V6 Engine will be available on all Highlander gas models and standard on all Hybrid grades. The new engine will generate more horsepower, provide enhanced fuel efficiency, and deliver a more direct driving feel by expanding the lock up range. In addition to Highlander, the new Direct Shift 8AT (automatic transmission) and 3.5-liter V6 Direct Injection Engine powertrain will be equipped in the 2017 model year Toyota Sienna van. In an effort to help conserve fuel, Highlander V6 models (excluding LE) will come standard with a new Stop and Start Engine System (S&S). While driving the Highlander, the S&S allows the engine to shut off when the vehicle comes to a complete stop and restarts when the driver lifts their foot off of the brake pedal. The standard powertrain on Highlander 4x2 LE gas models will remain the 2.7-liter 4- cylinder paired to a 6-speed automatic transmission. All Highlander Hybrid models will continue to receive the electronically-controlled continuously variable transmission (CVT).


News Article | March 29, 2016
Site: http://cleantechnica.com

There are big changes coming to the automotive industry over the next couple of decades, which is something that even relatively entrenched industry execs are seemingly starting to realize. What exactly are these changes though? And how to define them? A list of 6 primary transformative paradigms affecting the auto industry over the next quarter-century were recently defined and outlined by ABI Research, giving us perhaps some new means of answering those questions. While the future influence of autonomous driving technology and electrification on the automotive industry is a simple enough thing to speculate about, some of the other approaching paradigm shifts are perhaps a bit more opaque. The 6 “transformative paradigms” identified by ABI Research are electrification; driverless technology/car-sharing, the “software-defined car,” the “connected car,” sensors + big data, and cooperative mobility + the internet of things. The Managing Director and Vice President at ABI Research, Dominique Bonte, commented: “The final three stages — cooperative mobility, electrification, and car sharing leading to driverless cars — will be the most disruptive to the automotive industry. Not all car manufacturers will survive the changing landscape. And newcomers will also emerge, ones eager to create new, software-defined, high-tech cars.” Which is I suppose what companies such as Apple and Google are positioning themselves for. While the first three phases are already underway, the latter three will start to drive the market forward within the next 10 years, according to the market research firm. Car manufacturers are currently revamping vehicles’ electronics and networking architecture to ensure every sub-system is connected and software-defined. Moving toward the next decade, the automotive industry will achieve cooperative mobility. Cars will communicate with not only each other but also infrastructures and environments. Electrification will then change the way consumers power their vehicles. And, lastly, car sharing, and driverless cars, will likely lead to market consolidation. Through this industry fluctuation, there will be a number of opportunities for manufacturers and vendors to reinvent themselves, ABI said. A couple of points that were made with regard to that: One would think that with the shifting ground becoming more and more apparent, established auto-manufacturers would be putting more of an effort into staying ahead of the curve, but that largely doesn’t appear to be the case. Though perhaps there’s more going on behind closed doors than we are aware of? Reprinted with permission.    Get CleanTechnica’s 1st (completely free) electric car report → “Electric Cars: What Early Adopters & First Followers Want.”   Come attend CleanTechnica’s 1st “Cleantech Revolution Tour” event → in Berlin, Germany, April 9–10.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


News Article
Site: http://phys.org/technology-news/

To help cut through the noise, here are five categories we'll be watching: More dumb devices are getting "smart" by connecting to the Internet via embedded wireless radios. And more of these connected gadgets also are bulking up on computing power so they can do more with their newfound connectivity. Marathon Laundry, for example, has combined a washer and dryer into a single machine. Founded by former Apple executives, the Bay Area startup's washer/dryer combo includes a heavyweight computer processor, 10-inch HD touch screen, Wi-Fi connectivity and a gigabyte of memory. It automatically starts loads when energy rates are cheapest. If installed in an apartment building, it allows tenants to check availability and reserve a time slot online. Until now, many non-smartphone connected gadgets have been interesting but not necessarily essential to own. That could start to change, however, at this year's CES, said Jeff Orr, an analyst with ABI Research. The key will be delivering personal experiences, he said. "I would use the example of your car," Orr said. "To say it's connected is a so what? What does that do? "But what if - when you approach the vehicle - it recognizes who you are? It reconfigures the seat position, settings and content so that you have a really personalized experience. A lot of the discussion at CES will be about programs that organize information, prioritize it and make it personalized for users." Drones were everywhere at CES last year. Amazon and others are planning to use them to deliver packages eventually. But for now, the most common use of quad-copters is to strap on GoPro cameras and shoot video in the sky. GoPro has been hinting that it might get in the drone business itself with the Karma drone. It has the potential to create a lot of buzz at the show, said Scott Peterson, a digital camera analyst with Gap Intelligence. GoPro, founded by University of California, San Diego alum Nick Woodman, has been battling market saturation and increased competition from rivals such as Sony and Monster - which calls its action camera "The Villain" to counter GoPro's "Hero" line. Still, the company holds an overwhelming market share in action cameras, despite a plethora of copycats, Peterson said. Building a drone positions GoPro to counter efforts by some drone makers to equip their quad-copters with action cameras themselves, he said. Digital technology has improved nearly everything it has touched, including TVs and cameras. But it hasn't improved music. With audio, the emphasis of digital was packing thousands of songs into your pocket. As a result, quality suffered. But that trend is starting to reverse. High-quality headphones led the way. Now it's expanding to music players. Sony, Neil Young's Pono Music and others have come up with portable devices that pump out songs in high resolution. Online music stores also have popped up to sell these digitally dense recordings. "After two generations of going down to lower-quality sound, people want higher-quality sound now," said Gary Shapiro, head of the Consumer Technology Association, which produces CES. "It's bringing the studio to the listener, and it's not just for audiophiles." Big-screen TVs will no longer be the star of the show, but there will still be plenty to look at. TV makers rolled out super-thin sets and curved screen models last year - innovating on form factor. This year, they're getting back to picture quality. Ultra-high definition - or 4K - has been around for a while. This year, technology will be added to 4K sets that creates better contrast between the deepest darks and the lightest lights on screen, without an overexposed look, according to San Diego market research firm Gap Intelligence. This technology is called high dynamic range. In addition, quantum dots and similar improvements will expand the color gamut of TVs, said Paul Gagnon, an analyst with industry research firm IHS DisplaySearch. Although there is relatively little ultra-high-definition content available today, 4K TVs still account for roughly 15 percent of U.S. television sales, Gagnon said. "It is reasonable to expect there will be more 4K content three or four years from now," he said. TV makers could begin talking about the next picture-quality upgrade known as 8K. But analysts don't expect to see much in the way of demonstrations - in part because 4K is still relatively new on the market. The buzz, or lack thereof, around 3-D printing will be something to watch at the show. For the last three years, 3-D printing has been one of the most interesting new technologies at CES. And it's hot again this year, with a 30 percent increase in exhibitors. But despite the fun of printing three-dimensional objects, including electric guitar bodies and intricate candy, 3-D printing hasn't yet hit its stride with mainstream consumers. And it could begin to lose steam at CES compared with previous years as consumer adoption continues to be elusive, according to Gap Intelligence. Explore further: GoPro gets a little cheaper —and fancier —with new Hero4 camera


« Study suggests policymakers need to move beyond alt fuels hype to decarbonize transport successfully | Main | ABI Research forecasts global penetration of OEM telematics in new passenger cars to exceed 72% by 2021 » The Oregon Legislative Assembly approved a landmark bill that will commit the state to eliminate its use of coal power by 2035 and double the amount of renewable energy serving Oregonians to 50% by 2040. Otherwise known as the Clean Electricity and Coal Transition plan, Senate Bill 1547-B received final approval on the Senate floor Wednesday after the Oregon House approved the bill in a 38-20 bipartisan vote on Tuesday. The Clean Electricity and Coal Transition plan was crafted by bringing diverse parties to the table, including Oregon’s two largest electric utilities, energy industry and business groups, advocacy and community organizations. The plan received extensive public review in multiple state House and Senate hearings during January and February, as well as a special public meeting of the Oregon Public Utility Commission (OPUC). The electric utilities affected by the bill, Portland General Electric and Pacific Power, will work with the OPUC through their integrated resource plans to develop implementation strategies to meet the state’s new renewable power and coal transition standards.

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