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Pallivalappila A.R.,University of Aberdeen | Stewart D.,Robert Gordon University | Shetty A.,Royal Aberdeen Maternity Hospital | Pande B.,Ninewells Hospital and Medical School | And 2 more authors.
European Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology and Reproductive Biology | Year: 2014

Objective: To determine the prevalence and explore predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use during early pregnancy.Study design: A questionnaire survey of pregnant women (500) attending for mid trimester scan at the maternity services in Grampian, North-East Scotland. Outcome measures included; CAM used; vitamins and minerals used; independent predictors of use; views and experiences. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis.Results: The response rate was 66%. Two thirds of respondents (63%) reported using CAM, excluding vitamins and minerals, during early pregnancy. Respondents reported using a total of 28 different CAM modalities, of which oral herbal products were the most common (37% of respondents, 25 different products). The independent predictors of CAM use identified were: use by family and friends (OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.3-7.3, p < 0.001); ethnicity (non-white British) (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.8-6.8, p < 0.001); and use prior to pregnancy (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.8, p = 0.014). In comparison to prescribed medicines, most users were uncertain if CAM were safer (63%), more effective (66%), free from possible adverse effects (46%) or drug- CAM interactions (50%).Conclusions: Despite the majority of respondents being uncertain about their safety and effectiveness, CAM modalities and CAM products are widely used during the early stages of pregnancy in this study population. The role of family and friends rather than health professionals in the decision to use CAM may be of concern and requires further investigation. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Robert Gordon University, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Hamad Medical Corporation, Royal Aberdeen Maternity Hospital and University of Aberdeen
Type: | Journal: European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology | Year: 2014

To determine the prevalence and explore predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use during early pregnancy.A questionnaire survey of pregnant women (500) attending for mid trimester scan at the maternity services in Grampian, North-East Scotland. Outcome measures included; CAM used; vitamins and minerals used; independent predictors of use; views and experiences. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis.The response rate was 66%. Two thirds of respondents (63%) reported using CAM, excluding vitamins and minerals, during early pregnancy. Respondents reported using a total of 28 different CAM modalities, of which oral herbal products were the most common (37% of respondents, 25 different products). The independent predictors of CAM use identified were: use by family and friends (OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.3-7.3, p<0.001); ethnicity (non-white British) (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.8-6.8, p<0.001); and use prior to pregnancy (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.8, p=0.014). In comparison to prescribed medicines, most users were uncertain if CAM were safer (63%), more effective (66%), free from possible adverse effects (46%) or drug-CAM interactions (50%).Despite the majority of respondents being uncertain about their safety and effectiveness, CAM modalities and CAM products are widely used during the early stages of pregnancy in this study population. The role of family and friends rather than health professionals in the decision to use CAM may be of concern and requires further investigation.


Cameron A.,Southern General Hospital | Brennand J.,Southern General Hospital | Crichton L.,Royal Aberdeen Maternity Hospital | Gibson J.,Southern General Hospital
Fetal Medicine for the MRCOG and Beyond, Second Edition | Year: 2014

A solid understanding of fetal medicine is essential for the practice of obstetrics and gynaecology. This comprehensive book, which has been extensively updated to reflect current clinical practice and developments in the field since publication of the original edition, provides a thorough overview of fetal medicine, covering: screening for chromosomal abnormalities; prenatal diagnostic techniques; the routine anomaly scan; fetal structural abnormalities; fetal therapy; prenatal diagnosis and management of non-immune hydrops fetalis; termination of pregnancy for fetal abnormality; fetal growth restriction; twin pregnancy; and fetal infection. The book is primarily designed to provide a comprehensive summary for candidates preparing for the Part 2 MRCOG examination, and as such covers the RCOG curriculum for fetal medicine. It is also a valuable guide for all healthcare professionals working in the field, including trainees, consultants and midwives. © 2011 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. All rights reserved.

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