Hayward, CA, United States

Abeam TechNologies, Inc.

www.abeamtech.com
Hayward, CA, United States
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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.60K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: aBeam Technologies, Inc. proposes a new type of miniature spectrometer based on digital planar holography (DPH). This may lead to a revolution in optics, similar to the transition from electron tubes to integrated circuits in electronics. The spectrometer is an optical chip just a few millimeters in size; it can be implemented to detect any desired substance. The spectrometer can potentially be integrated with microfluidic circuitry into a laboratory-on-chip or even into cell phones. The fabrication method is compatible with micro/nanofabrication technology, which makes the production inexpensive. We have demonstrated the principle of DPH. The goal of this project is to demonstrate the new class of spectrometer-on-chip with functionality unattainable by common spectrometers, to design and fabricate a spectrometer with ultrahigh resolution in multiple, separated wavelength ranges. This type of device will be ideal for sensing specific materials, for example, for detecting biological and chemical hazards. BENEFIT: Our approach will revolutionize the applications of photo-spectrometers by greatly miniaturizing the sizes of sensors, decreasing their cost, and improving their sensitivity. The first targeted application will be the handheld, low-cost Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy system. It will then be expanded into other areas of spectrometers, such as Raman spectroscopy and for development of laboratory-on-chip. There is a potential for spectrometers-on-chip to be implemented within cell phones for specific biological or chemical hazard detection.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.89K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: aBeam Technologies, Inc. proposes a new printing technology for fabricating photonic devices. This nanofabrication process could potentially reduce to a single step, the fabrication of photonic crystals by direct imprinting on inorganic materials. The method is low cost and suitable for large-scale areas. The demonstration of feasibility of the method will provide the basis for fabricating a new class of quantum-dot nanolasers in Phase II. BENEFIT: Our approach will revolutionize the fabrication of nanophotonic components and will allow development of new photonic devices. The first targeted application will be a new class of quantum-dot nanolaser arrays. It will then be expanded into other areas of photonic applications, such as for displays. The method promises to enable the development of many other nanophotonic applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.71K | Year: 2011

ABSTRACT: aBeam Technologies, Inc. proposes a new type of miniature spectrometer based on digital planar holography (DPH). This may lead to a revolution in optics, similar to the transition from electron tubes to integrated circuits in electronics. The spectrometer is an optical chip just a few millimeters in size; it can be implemented to detect any desired substance. The spectrometer can potentially be integrated with microfluidic circuitry into a laboratory-on-chip or even into cell phones. The fabrication method is compatible with micro/nanofabrication technology, which makes the production inexpensive. We have demonstrated the principle of DPH. The goal of this project is to demonstrate the new class of spectrometer-on-chip with functionality unattainable by common spectrometers, to design and fabricate a spectrometer with ultrahigh resolution in multiple, separated wavelength ranges. This type of device will be ideal for sensing specific materials, for example, for detecting biological and chemical hazards. BENEFIT: Our approach will revolutionize the applications of photo-spectrometers by greatly miniaturizing the sizes of sensors, decreasing their cost, and improving their sensitivity. The first targeted application will be the handheld, low-cost Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy system. It will then be expanded into other areas of spectrometers, such as Raman spectroscopy and for development of laboratory-on-chip. There is a potential for spectrometers-on-chip to be implemented within cell phones for specific biological or chemical hazard detection.


Grant
Agency: | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2015

The near-field Campanile probe offer an unique solution to explore the behavior of matter at the nanometer scale by simultaneously imaging the physicochemical properties and the local morphology of materials. However, the fabrication of these revolutionary tips is complex and expensive with poor reproducibility, all of which prohibits any commercialization. Statement of How this Problem or Situation is Being Addressed This project proposes to develop a novel fabrication technology for directly imprinting the Campanile probes on the top of commercial optical fibers or other microscopy tips. The high resolution and versatility of the NIL technology are perfectly suitable for manufacturing the nano- tips in a cost-effective and reproducible way. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits This revolutionary imaging tool will be used in a broad range of applications including solar-cells, new hard drives and artificial proteins. Biologists, chemists, electrical engineers, and physicists will use the Campanile tips to probe matter at the nanoscale and design novel applications. Numerous research laboratories are just waiting for using the tips.


Babin S.,Abeam TechNologies, Inc. | Bay K.,Abeam TechNologies, Inc. | Hwu J.J.,Seagate Technology
Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B:Nanotechnology and Microelectronics | Year: 2010

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) metrology involves significant uncertainty of the linewidth measurement because the SEM image brightness is a complex function of SEM setup, pattern materials, and shape. In this work, the authors used an analytical SEM for critical dimensions metrology applications on a quartz nanoimprint template. The SEM was tuned to find the best condition for consistent operation. Beam characterization was done using BEAMETR beam measurement technique. SEM images of templates were taken at optimum conditions. The measurements were done using two methods: regular imaging processing software based on brightness threshold and using physical model based processing tool myCD. The quartz template was then measured using transmission electron microscopy cross sections at selected sites to reveal profile information as metrology comparison reference. The metrology capability and limitations of analytical SEM with regular image processing were identified. The considerable improvement of accuracy using the physics based image processing was found. © 2010 American Vacuum Society.


Shin Y.J.,University of Michigan | Pina-Hernandez C.,University of Michigan | Pina-Hernandez C.,Abeam TechNologies, Inc. | Wu Y.-K.,University of Michigan | And 2 more authors.
Nanotechnology | Year: 2012

In this study, we report a new method to fabricate a wire grid polarizer (WGP) that greatly relaxes the requirement on patterning and etching, and can be easily applied to produce flexible WGPs. The technique is to pattern a high aspect ratio and narrow linewidth grating by nanoimprint lithography followed by two angled aluminum depositions in opposite directions to produce the narrow spacing between the aluminum lines required for a visible band WGP. Anisotropic reactive ion etching is used to remove the aluminum deposited at the top of the grating but leave the aluminum layer on the grating sidewalls, thereby forming a metal wire grid with much smaller spacings than a lithographically defined grating. As a result, the fabricated WGP showed good performance in a wide range of visible wavelength. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2014

ABSTRACT: aBeam Technologies, Inc. proposes a new printing technology for fabricating photonic devices. This nanofabrication process could potentially reduce to a single step, the fabrication of photonic crystals by direct imprinting on inorganic materials. The method is low cost and suitable for large-scale areas. In Phase I, the demonstration of feasibility of the method provides the basis for fabricating a new class of quantum-dot nanolasers in Phase II. BENEFIT: Our approach will revolutionize the fabrication of nanophotonic components and will allow development of new photonic devices. The first targeted application will be a new class of quantum-dot nanolaser arrays. It will then be expanded into other areas of photonic applications, such as for displays. The method promises to enable the development of many other nanophotonic applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.84K | Year: 2014

Metrology is a multi-billion dollar industry that is an indispensable part of science and manufacturing. A variety of techniques including interferometric microscopes, scanning electron microscopes (SEM), X-ray, and atomic force microscopes (AFM) are used in X- ray mirror manufacturing. The performance of any tool directly depends on the ability to characterize and tune it. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is the most comprehensive characteristic of any tool; however, it is not widely used because of its complex implementation and because of the lack of availability of test samples with the required spatial frequencies. The objective of this proposal is to develop and commercialize a comprehensive method, test samples, and software for the evaluation and calibration of metrological instrumentation used in the manufacturing of X-ray optical elements as well as in many other areas of metrology and nanosciences. The technique, which is based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) arrays, was developed and patented by LBNL scientists. The method is based on a measurement of the spatial frequency response of the instrument from a specially designed test sample. The sample involves a pseudo-random pattern; the instrument will measure the sample and produce data that distorts the MTF of the known sample, adding signature of the instrument. Nanofabrication technology will be used for fabrication of test samples. This will assure availability of artifacts, especially for high-frequency measurements. A commercial-quality software will be developed to automate the calibration process in order to improve reliability, exclude the & quot;human factor, & quot; and simplify and speed up the calibration. This technique based on the BPR is extremely sensitive, and it is universal to characterize almost any type of metrological equipment. The technology fits perfectly into aBeam & apos;s existing line of products, which are used mostly for metrology and nanofabrication.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 147.54K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop a novel technique for manufacturing digital planar holograms, which will result in the enhancement of the brightness and power density of high-power laser diodes. Preliminary results of coupling lasers with holograms demonstrated a suppression of lateral modes, which enhances brightness and, additionally, narrows and stabilizes the laser spectrum. The successful introduction of this technology in the laser marketplace depends on the ability to fabricate planar holograms at a low cost and a simplification of their integration with laser diodes. The objective of this project is to develop and launch the commercialization of holographic lasers with higher a brightness and power. Phase I will consist of exploring a novel nano-manufacturing technology for low-cost fabrication of planar holograms by imprinting planar holograms into sol-gel films. The research will explore the issue of correlating the imprint process parameters with the sol-gel material properties to replicate computer-generated holograms with high performance. Phase II will demonstrate the monolithic integration of imprinted planar holograms into commercial laser diodes.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is that the brightness and power density of current, high-power laser diodes can be increased, while retaining their compact size and low cost. Semiconductor diode lasers have achieved high output power, allowing them to transition from special scientific items into true industrial tools. There is a huge interest worldwide in major industrial applications of semiconductor lasers such as direct materials processing and pump sources for industrial solid-state lasers and optical fiber lasers. Development of laser diodes with higher performance is being pursued by all major laser manufacturers and will have direct applications in multi-billion dollar markets, such as material processing and the semiconductor industry. The proposed nanofabrication process will allow the low-cost fabrication of digital planar holograms and will simplify their future monolithic integration with commercial laser diodes. Competing solutions are much more expensive and less compact.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.99K | Year: 2015

Metrology is a multi-billion dollar industry that is an indispensable part of science and manufacturing. A variety of techniques including interferometric microscopes, scanning electron microscopes (SEM), X-ray, and atomic force microscopes (AFM) are used in X-ray mirror manufacturing. The performance of any tool directly depends on the ability to characterize and tune it. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is the most comprehensive characteristic of any tool; however, it is rarely used because of the complexity of its implementation. There are no suitable test samples with the required spatial frequencies or software. The objective of this proposal is to develop and commercialize an automatic, turn-key solution to enable the calibration of top level metrological instrumentation used in the manufacturing of X-ray optical elements as well as in many other areas of metrology and nanosciences. The heart of this project lies in the design and fabrication of ideal test samples based on pseudo- random line widths. The power spectra of such samples are inherently flat. Any deviation of the measured data from the flat spectra characterizes the signature of the instrument over its entire dynamic range. We have successfully used nanofabrication technology to fabricate a variety of test samples; the worlds best resolution of 1.5 nm lines was achieved. The developed technique was applied to optimally focus and verify the super-high resolution of soft x-ray microscopes, and to precisely calibrate the instruments. The best ever resolution of soft x-ray microscopes was achieved when using our test samples. A variety of test samples suitable for the calibration of TEMs, SEMs, AFMs, optical microscopes and interferometers were also developed and fabricated. The fabrication technology has progressed so immensely: test samples with a resolution down to 250 nm demonstrated in the past are now extended to a resolution of 30 nm. All the test samples were measured using metrology instruments. In Phase II, a turnkey solution will be developed: Fabrication technologies based on nanoimprint will be developed to enable inexpensive manufacturing of pseudo-random test samples for each type of instrumentation, fully automatic software will be developed to calibrate a variety of metrological instrumentation; the software will be adjusted and tuned for each kind of instrumentation. The worlds top companies highly valued our results, requesting the test samples and software immediately after they become commercially available. The solution will improve reliability, exclude the "human factor," and simplify and expedite the calibration. This new technology fits perfectly into aBeam's existing line of products, which are used mostly for metrology and nanofabrication.

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