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Ali I.A.,Communications
International Journal of Electrical Power and Energy Systems | Year: 2013

The paper presents a major consideration for enhancement of the transmission line protection using wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi) communication protocol for data sharing between relays. The principle of using the wireless technology for transmission line protection is introduced. The proposed protection scheme proved high degree of reliability and stability. Securing data transfer is very essential to be considered in this study. Securing data transfer between relays is an important concern to guarantee sufficient protection of the network. Such major factor is very essential for enhancement of the power network protection scheme using the new technology of wireless. Three possible alternatives to this problem are discussed in this paper. Short and long term solutions are also considered. Two security mechanisms are used using D-Link DWL-G700AP Access Point cards. The cards are interfaced with a prototype transmission line model. They have the ability to transfer files with a maximum wireless signal rate up to 54 Mbps. Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) as a security system is proved to solve many problems with advanced encryption in addition to providing authentication. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Keith Buckley, president of the ASC Signal Division of Communications & Power Industries LLC (CPI) has accepted an invitation to speak on the topic of market diversification and niche market development at the SATELLITE 2017 conference on March 7, 2017 in Washington, D.C. Mr. Buckley will join executives from teleport operators worldwide during the World Teleport Association’s annual track of panels, called the “Ground Segment Forum.” Buckley will moderate a panel titled, “Diversify Your Markets or Drill Deep into Your Niche?” The session will start at 11:30 a.m. The focus of the panel will be on how leaders need to respond to shifting markets and technologies. “Whether broader diversification or deeper penetration is the best path for growth is a significant question for the satellite and teleport industry,” said Buckley. “Should the business seek to diversify into new markets in search of growth? Or should you drill deeper into established niches where expertise and market knowledge create ‘sticky’ solutions that are hard for customers to replace? All businesses, including CPI ASC Signal Division, confront this challenge at some point, and I expect this to be a fascinating conversation.” During the panel discussion, case studies from business leaders will illuminate possible choices and outcomes of this challenge. Confirmed session participants include James Trevelyan from Arqiva Broadcast & Media, Marzio Laurenti of Telespazio Brazil and Koby Zontag from PCCW Global. The panel will be followed by the annual World Teleport Association Awards for Excellence, now in its 21st year. CPI ASC Signal Division is a sponsor of the high-profile luncheon during the SATELLITE 2017 conference. Several CPI divisions will be attending the SATELLITE 2017 conference. To learn more, please visit http://www.cpii.com/events.cfm/0/212. About CPI ASC Signal Division ASC Signal is a multinational manufacturer of high-performance, highly-engineered satellite Earth station, radar and HF antenna systems. In September 2015, ASC Signal was acquired by Communications & Power Industries LLC, becoming CPI ASC Signal Division. Its customers include international broadcasters and Fortune 500 companies, as well as military and government organizations. ASC Signal leads through design innovation that capitalizes on a +40-year heritage of engineering creativity and excellence. ASC Signal is a member of the World Teleport Association and the Society of Satellite Professionals International and is a supporter of the satellite industry’s Better Satellite World campaign. http://www.ascsignal.com About Communications & Power Industries LLC Communications & Power Industries LLC (CPI), headquartered in Palo Alto, California, is a subsidiary of CPI International Holding Corp. and CPI International, Inc. CPI develops, manufactures and globally distributes components and subsystems used in the generation, amplification, transmission and reception of microwave signals for a wide variety of systems including radar, electronic warfare and communications (satellite and point-to-point) systems for military and commercial applications, specialty products for medical diagnostic imaging and the treatment of cancer, as well as microwave and RF energy generating products for various industrial and scientific pursuits. http://www.cpii.com ### Certain statements included above constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking statements provide our current expectations, beliefs or forecasts of future events. These statements are not guarantees of future performance. Forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the results projected, expected or implied by these forward-looking statements. These factors include, but are not limited to, competition in our end markets; our significant amount of debt; changes or reductions in the U.S. defense budget; currency fluctuations; goodwill impairment considerations; customer cancellations of sales contracts; U.S. Government contracts; export restrictions and other laws and regulations; international laws; changes in technology; the impact of unexpected costs; the impact of a general slowdown in the global economy; the impact of environmental laws and regulations; inability to obtain raw materials and components; and the impact of unexpected results of, or issues in connection with, dispositions and acquisitions. These and other risks are described in more detail in our periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All future written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to us or any person acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained or referred to in this section. New risks and uncertainties arise from time to time, and it is impossible for us to predict these events or how they may affect us. We undertake no duty or obligation to (i) publicly revise any forward-looking statement to reflect circumstances or events occurring after the date hereof, (ii) to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events or changes in our expectations or (iii) to publicly correct or update any forward-looking statement if CPI becomes aware that such statement is not likely to be achieved.


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The ASC Signal Division of Communications & Power Industries LLC (CPI) is now shipping a new high-wind version of its popular 2.5-meter Nomadic Antenna. The trailer mountable, carbon-fiber antenna is being sold to organizations for use in remote field deployment applications for defense and commercial industry customers. CPI ASC Signal Division developed the durable technology for its new version of the Nomadic Antenna to address industry and customer requirements that the company has seen evolve through several programs. CPI ASC Signal Division’s latest Nomadic Antenna product is capable of operation at L-, X-, C-, Ku-, Ka-, Q- and V-bands and is the latest addition to the company’s expanded mobile product line. In its latest configuration, the Nomadic Antenna system serves as the platform for an ARSTRAT-certified terminal and, to date, more than 100 systems are in service worldwide. Additionally, the 2.5-meter system combines the company’s innovative antenna design with its state of the art Next Generation Controller (NGC) to provide the industry’s highest level of acquisition, tracking accuracy and performance from antenna systems of this size. CPI ASC Signal Division continues to expand its portfolio of mobile and transportable antenna systems, based on the company’s existing line of high-performance fixed earth station antennas. CPI ASC Signal Division’s product offering now includes mobile and transportable antenna systems that reach from 2.4 through 4.6 meters, along with fixed antenna systems that reach through 9.4 meters. The company’s antenna products are designed for service to all commercial and non-commercial/military satellite bands. “Our new Nomadic Antenna product is an evolution in state-of-the-art antenna design that addresses our customers’ critical needs,” said CPI ASC Signal Division president Keith Buckley. “As mobility continues to be a prominent and dominant requirement for remote applications, CPI ASC Signal Division continues to deliver earth station antennas that seamlessly integrate fixed and mobile systems into the same network architecture. What is unique about our approach is that we are able to utilize the same antenna controller systems, regardless of the antenna platform, thereby reducing costs to customers and providing uniform operation across the entire network.” About CPI ASC Signal Division In September 2015, ASC Signal was acquired by Communications & Power Industries LLC, becoming CPI ASC Signal Division, a multinational manufacturer of high-performance, highly engineered satellite Earth station, radar and HF antenna systems. Its customers include international broadcasters and Fortune 500 companies, as well as military and government organizations. CPI ASC Signal Division leads through design innovation that capitalizes on a more than 40-year heritage of engineering creativity and excellence. The ASC Signal Division of CPI is a member of the World Teleport Association and the Society of Satellite Professionals International and a supporter of the satellite industry’s Better Satellite World campaign. http://www.cpii.com/ascsignal About Communications & Power Industries LLC Communications & Power Industries LLC (CPI), headquartered in Palo Alto, California, is a subsidiary of CPI International Holding Corp. and CPI International, Inc. CPI develops, manufactures and globally distributes components and subsystems used in the generation, amplification, transmission and reception of microwave signals for a wide variety of systems including radar, electronic warfare and communications (satellite and point-to-point) systems for military and commercial applications, specialty products for medical diagnostic imaging and the treatment of cancer, as well as microwave and RF energy generating products for various industrial and scientific pursuits. http://www.cpii.com/ ### Certain statements included above constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking statements provide our current expectations, beliefs or forecasts of future events. These statements are not guarantees of future performance. Forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual events or results to differ materially from the results projected, expected or implied by these forward-looking statements. These factors include, but are not limited to, competition in our end markets; our significant amount of debt; changes or reductions in the U.S. defense budget; currency fluctuations; goodwill impairment considerations; customer cancellations of sales contracts; U.S. Government contracts; export restrictions and other laws and regulations; international laws; changes in technology; the impact of unexpected costs; the impact of a general slowdown in the global economy; the impact of environmental laws and regulations; inability to obtain raw materials and components; and the impact of unexpected results of, or issues in connection with, dispositions and acquisitions. These and other risks are described in more detail in our periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All future written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to us or any person acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained or referred to in this section. New risks and uncertainties arise from time to time, and it is impossible for us to predict these events or how they may affect us. We undertake no duty or obligation to (i) publicly revise any forward-looking statement to reflect circumstances or events occurring after the date hereof, (ii) to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events or changes in our expectations or (iii) to publicly correct or update any forward-looking statement if CPI becomes aware that such statement is not likely to be achieved.


Kramer D.M.,University of Waterloo | Wells R.P.,University of Waterloo | Carlan N.,University of Waterloo | Aversa T.,Ontario Public Service Employees Union | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics | Year: 2013

Few evaluation tools are available to assess knowledge-transfer and exchange interventions. The objective of this paper is to develop and demonstrate a theory-based knowledge-transfer and exchange method of evaluation (KEME) that synthesizes 3 theoretical frameworks: the promoting action on research implementation of health services (PARiHS) model, the transtheoretical model of change, and a model of knowledge use. It proposes a new term, keme, to mean a unit of evidence-based transferable knowledge. The usefulness of the evaluation method is demonstrated with 4 occupational health and safety knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) implementation case studies that are based upon the analysis of over 50 pre-existing interviews. The usefulness of the evaluation model has enabled us to better understand stakeholder feedback, frame our interpretation, and perform a more comprehensive evaluation of the knowledge use outcomes of our KTE efforts.


Bennett A.,Center for Public Policy | Garcia E.,Center for Public Policy | Schulze M.,Center for Public Policy | Bailey M.,University of Houston | And 10 more authors.
American Journal of Clinical Pathology | Year: 2014

Objectives: To analyze the demand for services from the nation's medical laboratories, which is predicted to dramatically increase as our citizens age and millions receive insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act. Methods: A systematic review of relevant publications and databases was conducted to assess the current state of the nation's medical laboratory workforce and to examine the impact of population demographics and health reform on workforce development to address the future demand for laboratory services. Results: Building a Laboratory Workforce to Meet the Future, a new report from the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), provides a comprehensive strategy to address the future workforce needs of the nation's medical laboratories to meet this demand to provide timely, accurate, and safe patient care and to fully realize the benefits of personalized medicine. Conclusions: The report, from the ASCP Task Force on the Laboratory Professionals Workforce, is a comprehensive review of the myriad of factors affecting recruitment and retention of qualified laboratory professionals and provides a set of thoughtful recommendations outlining a multifaceted approach to bolster the pipeline of potential candidates for the profession as well as leadership in health care. © American Society for Clinical Pathology.


Tian Z.,Loughborough University | Tian Z.,Aston University | Tian Z.,Integrated Geochemical Interpretation Ltd. | Gong Y.,Loughborough University | And 3 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology | Year: 2016

This paper proposes a novel buffer-aided link selection scheme based on network coding in the multiple-hop relay network. The proposed scheme significantly increases transmission throughput by applying data buffers at the relays to decrease the outage probability and using network coding to increase the data rate. The closed-form expressions of both average throughput and packet delay are successfully derived. The proposed scheme not only has significantly higher throughput than both the traditional and existing buffer-aided max-link schemes but smaller average packet delay than the max-link scheme as well, making it an attractive scheme in practice. © 2015 IEEE.


Finn A.,University of South Australia | Jacoff A.,Intelligent Systems Technology, Inc. | Del Rose M.,Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center | Kania B.,Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Field Robotics | Year: 2012

The robotics community benefits from common test methods and metrics of performance to focus their research. As a result, many performance tests, competitions, demonstrations, and analyses have been devised to measure the autonomy, intelligence, and overall effectiveness of robots. These range from robot soccer (football) to measuring the performance of a robot in computer simulations. However, many resultant designs are narrowly focused oroptimized against the specific tasks under consideration. In the Multi-Autonomous Ground-robotic International Challenge (MAGIC) 2010, the need to transition the technology beyond the laboratory and into contexts for which it had not specifically been designed or tested meant that a performance evaluation scheme was needed that avoided domain-specific tests. However, the scheme still had to retain the capacity to deliver an impartial, consistent, objective, and evidence-based assessment that rewarded individual and multivehicle autonomy. It was also important to maximize the understanding and outcomes for technologists, sponsors, and potential usersgained through after-action review. The need for real-time, simultaneous, and continuous tracking of multiple interacting entities in an urban environment and over 250,000 square meters in real time compounded the complexity of the task. This paper describes the scheme used to progressively down-select and finally rank the teams competing in this complex and "operationally realistic" challenge. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Soden R.,Computer Science | Palen L.,Computer Science | Chase C.,Communications | Sprain L.,Communications | Goldstein B.E.,Environmental Design
ISCRAM 2015 Conference Proceedings - 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management | Year: 2015

This paper presents findings from an interdisciplinary research effort studying community resilience in Boulder, Colorado. Boulder is a progressive region with a history of environmental leadership. The area is currently in the process of recovering from major flooding and has launched several new initiatives related to building longterm resilience to natural disasters and other stressors. In our research, we consider the stakeholders involved in building local resilience as well as the different and often contradictory framings of the concept. This study takes a phenomenological and inductive approach to understanding resilience. In contrast to more reductionist frameworks that are frequently offered, we argue that this allows for greater understanding of the polyvocal and emergent qualities of resilience.


Mosley K.,Strategic Alliances | Miller P.,Communications
Journal of Medical Practice Management | Year: 2015

Due to a variety of impingements on their clinical decision-making and overall practice autonomy, many physicians are expressing frustration with the current medical practice environment and are disengaging from patient care roles as a result. In this article, we trace the causes of physician dissatisfaction and the ways in which physicians are seeking alternative practice styles. We then outline steps medical practices can take to keep physicians engaged in patient care and productive in their practices. Copyright © 2015 by Greenbranch Publishing LLC.


PubMed | The European AIDS Treatment Group and Communications
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the International AIDS Society | Year: 2014

Most existing conventional capacity building and educational programs are currently executed on ad-hoc basis. Such approach no longer responds to the needs and capabilities of patients, supporters and healthcare providers in their engagement with and contribution to response to HIV/AIDS. In contrast, long-term, course-like trainings have considerably broader thematic scope and are conducive to more effective and sustainable learning, exchange of experience and best practices.Over the period of one year, the Academy trains a cohort of 20 activists (10 from East Europe and Central Asia and 10 from Western and Southern Europe). The Academy goes beyond treatment only paradigm. Conceptually, five training modules are grouped under three larger domains: treatment literacy, treatment advocacy and treatment activism, thus covering most of the topics pertinent to the current discourse of HIV and related co-infections. To ensure cascade effect and sustainability of the learning, the trainees are offered participation in pan-European HIV conferences (EACS and HIV Glasgow) and resources for follow-up activities.The trainees empirically applied the knowledge to the benefits of their communities. In Uzbekistan, a trainee introduced EACS treatment guidelines to fellow medical students and junior doctors. In Armenia and Albania a series of small-scale trainings were held, outreaching to young homeless people who were traditionally excluded from HIV treatment and prevention discourse in the two countries. A trainee from Spain used the materials of the Academy in his work in Mozambique and the Spanish Ministry of Health. Five trainees engaged in a joint European cross-countries project on treatment literacy for young people who are most at risk of infection.EATG Training Academy is a unique initiative in the WHO Europe region that both trains future treatment activists and addresses treatment literacy, advocacy and advocacy topics. This type of capacity building can respond to existing HIV-related problems more effectively using less limited resources and reaching out to larger communities.

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