711th Human Performance Wing

Eidson Road, TX, United States

711th Human Performance Wing

Eidson Road, TX, United States

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DoD Future Warfighter Performance, Capabilities and Survivability to be the Focus of Upcoming Senior Level Symposium for DoD, Industry and Academia On April 25-26, 2017, senior leaders within the U.S. Military Services, DoD, Industry and Academia will convene in Alexandria, VA, for two days of off the record briefings and senior level discussions at Defense Strategies Institute’s "Town Hall" Future Warfighter Symposium. The Symposium will take an integrated approach, spanning multiple capabilities and research areas that ultimately combine on the dismounted Warfighter. Washington, DC, March 01, 2017 --( 1. Advanced materials and fabrics to aide in clothing efficiencies 2. Wearable robotics and advancements in human-machine integration 3. Next-gen research in personal protective equipment / exoskeletons: malleable fabric exosuits, and "liquid armour" and buoyant body armor 4. Energy and Power for the dismounted Soldier: energy harvesting capabilities, improved battery power (supplying, harnessing and generating power) 5. Research and technologies in human factors to improve Warfighter performance 6. Integrating biometric sensors and monitoring physiological data 7. Augmented reality technology and tactical operations “We have created a Symposium that will bring together a variety of stakeholders in order to build out two days of discussion and dialogue that spans a variety of disciplines involved in enhancing the capabilities and performance of our future Warfighters,” stated Monica Mckenzie, Senior Partner, Defense Strategies Institute. Several speakers include: *BG Brian Mennes, USA, Director, Joint and Integration, G-8, HQDA *COL Ed Barker, USA, PM Soldier Warrior, PEO Soldier *Dr. John Pazik, SES, Department Head, Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Department, ONR *COL James Miller, USA, Director Joint Acquisition Task Force (JATF) TALOS, USSOCOM *Col Brian L. Magnuson, USMC, Director, Expeditionary Energy Office, HQMC *Dr. Rajesh Naik, SES, Chief Scientist, 711th Human Performance Wing, Air Force Research Laboratory *Dr. Mike LaFiandra, Chief Scientist (A), Human Research and Engineering Directorate, ARL *COL Richard Malish, USA, Commander, U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory *Dr. Conor Walsh, BioDesign Lab, Harvard University *Mr. Cory Goetz, Power and Energy Directorate, CP&ID, CERDEC Seating is limited – In order to allow for actionable discussion and dialogue amongst speaker and attendees, seating will be limited. Register now to reserve your seat. Active military, government and State personnel attend complimentary. Anyone interested in participating in the Summit can go to Defense Strategies Institute's website at http://futurewarfighter.dsigroup.org for more information or contact Lisa Madison at lmadison@dsigroup.org 1-917-435-1266 Recognizing the great sacrifice that our men and women of the Armed Services have endured, DSI supports our Veteran’s and severely injured Service men and women and their families through our direct charitable donations. To learn more, please visit http://dsigroup.org/giving-back About DSI: Operating guidelines: In order to maintain our non-partisan stance, DSI receives no financial investment for operating costs from any outside organization, individual or group. Washington, DC, March 01, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Viewing the Warfighter as a “system of systems” the Symposium will cover topics such as:1. Advanced materials and fabrics to aide in clothing efficiencies2. Wearable robotics and advancements in human-machine integration3. Next-gen research in personal protective equipment / exoskeletons: malleable fabric exosuits, and "liquid armour" and buoyant body armor4. Energy and Power for the dismounted Soldier: energy harvesting capabilities, improved battery power (supplying, harnessing and generating power)5. Research and technologies in human factors to improve Warfighter performance6. Integrating biometric sensors and monitoring physiological data7. Augmented reality technology and tactical operations“We have created a Symposium that will bring together a variety of stakeholders in order to build out two days of discussion and dialogue that spans a variety of disciplines involved in enhancing the capabilities and performance of our future Warfighters,” stated Monica Mckenzie, Senior Partner, Defense Strategies Institute.Several speakers include:*BG Brian Mennes, USA, Director, Joint and Integration, G-8, HQDA*COL Ed Barker, USA, PM Soldier Warrior, PEO Soldier*Dr. John Pazik, SES, Department Head, Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Department, ONR*COL James Miller, USA, Director Joint Acquisition Task Force (JATF) TALOS, USSOCOM*Col Brian L. Magnuson, USMC, Director, Expeditionary Energy Office, HQMC*Dr. Rajesh Naik, SES, Chief Scientist, 711th Human Performance Wing, Air Force Research Laboratory*Dr. Mike LaFiandra, Chief Scientist (A), Human Research and Engineering Directorate, ARL*COL Richard Malish, USA, Commander, U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory*Dr. Conor Walsh, BioDesign Lab, Harvard University*Mr. Cory Goetz, Power and Energy Directorate, CP&ID, CERDECSeating is limited –In order to allow for actionable discussion and dialogue amongst speaker and attendees, seating will be limited. Register now to reserve your seat. Active military, government and State personnel attend complimentary.Anyone interested in participating in the Summit can go to Defense Strategies Institute's website at http://futurewarfighter.dsigroup.org for more information or contact Lisa Madison at lmadison@dsigroup.org 1-917-435-1266Recognizing the great sacrifice that our men and women of the Armed Services have endured, DSI supports our Veteran’s and severely injured Service men and women and their families through our direct charitable donations. To learn more, please visit http://dsigroup.org/giving-backAbout DSI:Operating guidelines: In order to maintain our non-partisan stance, DSI receives no financial investment for operating costs from any outside organization, individual or group.


Williamson C.A.,UK Defence Science and Technology Laboratory | McLin L.N.,711th Human Performance Wing
Applied Optics | Year: 2015

A simple model for laser eye dazzle is presented together with calculations for laser safety applications based on the newly defined Maximum Dazzle Exposure (MDE) and Nominal Ocular Dazzle Distance (NODD). A validated intraocular scatter model has been combined with a contrast threshold target detection model to quantify the impact of laser eye dazzle on human performance. This allows the calculation of the MDE, the threshold laser irradiance below which a target can be detected, and the NODD, the minimum distance for the visual detection of a target in the presence of laser dazzle. The model is suitable for non-expert use to give an estimate of anticipated laser eye dazzle effects in a range of civilian and military scenarios. © 2015 Optical Society of America.


Wharmby A.W.,711th Human Performance Wing | Bagley R.L.,University of Texas at San Antonio
International Journal of Engineering Science | Year: 2015

An empirical model has been recently derived and used to modify Maxwell's equations for dielectric materials based on viscoelastic analysis techniques that employs concepts from the fractional calculus. The empirical model was originally used to curve fit complex permittivity data of dielectrics exposed to electromagnetic fields oscillating in the radiofrequency band. The model was then incorporated into Maxwell's equations giving rise to a fractional order Ampere's law that subsequently produced a fractional order wave equation. This wave equation was shown to accurately describe the behavior of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a dielectric material. This work demonstrates that the application of these techniques can seamlessly be extended into the terahertz frequency band (ranging approximately from 1011 Hz to 1013 Hz) producing results of comparable accuracy to that which was shown in the radiofrequency band (ranging approximately from 102 Hz to 1010 Hz) while still remaining consistent with thermodynamic principles. The procedure is briefly reviewed and compared to the historical dielectric models of Debye and Cole-Cole and then applied to model the dielectric behavior of select materials in the terahertz frequency band. The work concludes with an analysis on the dispersion and absorption of terahertz waves using the aforementioned fractional order wave equation.


Davidson M.E.,711th Human Performance Wing | Davidson M.E.,UES, Inc. | Harbaugh S.V.,711th Human Performance Wing | Harbaugh S.V.,Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Inc | And 4 more authors.
ACS Chemical Biology | Year: 2013

Riboswitches are RNA sequences that regulate expression of associated downstream genes in response to the presence or absence of specific small molecules. A novel riboswitch that activates protein translation in E. coli cells in response to 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) has been engineered. A plasmid library was constructed by incorporation of 30 degenerate bases between a previously described trinitrotoluene aptamer and the ribosome binding site. Screening was performed by placing the riboswitch library upstream of the Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease coding sequence in one plasmid; a second plasmid encoded a FRET-based construct linked with a peptide containing the TEV protease cleavage site. Addition of DNT to bacterial culture activated the riboswitch, initiating translation of TEV protease. In turn, the protease cleaved the linker in the FRET-based fusion protein, causing a change in fluorescence. This new riboswitch exhibited a 10-fold increase in fluorescence in the presence of 0.5 mM DNT compared to the system without target. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Walsh A.J.,National Research Council Italy | Beier H.T.,711th Human Performance Wing
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2016

Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) is the most robust method for fluorescence lifetime imaging using laser scanning microscopes. However, TCSPC is inherently slow making it ineffective to capture rapid events due to the single photon product per laser pulse causing extensive acquisition time limitations and the requirement of low fluorescence emission efficiency to avoid bias of measurement towards short lifetimes. Furthermore, thousands of photons per pixel are required for traditional instrument response deconvolution and fluorescence lifetime exponential decay estimation. Instrument response deconvolution and fluorescence exponential decay estimation can be performed in several ways including iterative least squares minimization and Laguerre deconvolution. This paper compares the limitations and accuracy of these fluorescence decay analysis techniques to accurately estimate double exponential decays across many data characteristics including various lifetime values, lifetime component weights, signal-to-noise ratios, and number of photons detected. Furthermore, techniques to improve data fitting, including binning data temporally and spatially, are evaluated as methods to improve decay fits and reduce image acquisition time. Simulation results demonstrate that binning temporally to 36 or 42 time bins, improves accuracy of fits for low photon count data. Such a technique reduces the required number of photons for accurate component estimation if lifetime values are known, such as for commercial fluorescent dyes and FRET experiments, and improve imaging speed 10-fold. Copyright © 2016 SPIE.


Hokr B.H.,Texas A&M University | Bixler J.N.,Texas A&M University | Noojin G.D.,TASC Inc | Thomas R.J.,711Th Human Performance Wing | And 5 more authors.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | Year: 2014

The task of identifying explosives, hazardous chemicals, and biological materials from a safe distance is the subject we consider. Much of the prior work on stand-off spectroscopy using light has been devoted to generating a backward-propagating beam of light that can be used drive further spectroscopic processes. The discovery of random lasing and, more recently, random Raman lasing provide a mechanism for remotely generating copious amounts of chemically specific Raman scattered light. The bright nature of random Raman lasing renders directionality unnecessary, allowing for the detection and identification of chemicals from large distances in real time. In this article, the single-shot remote identification of chemicals at kilometer-scale distances is experimentally demonstrated using random Raman lasing.


Wharmby A.W.,711th Human Performance Wing
International Journal of Engineering Science | Year: 2016

In the first paper of this series, an empirical formula based on viscoelastic analysis techniques that employs concepts from the fractional calculus originally used to model the dielectric behavior of materials exposed to oscillating electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency band was applied to do the same for electromagnetic fields oscillating in the terahertz frequency range. The empirical formula was integrated into Maxwell's equations producing a fractional order Ampere's law whereof a fractional order wave equation was derived. This wave equation was used to describe the absorption and dispersion of terahertz waves in a dielectric medium. In this work, the empirical formula is extended again for application in the infrared frequency spectrum. The fractional calculus dielectric model is adapted to curve fit the complex refractive index data of a variety of semiconductors and insulators. Following the same procedure used in the first paper of this series, the fractional calculus dielectric model is again integrated in Maxwell's equations with the same dispersion and absorption analysis performed using the newly derived fractional order wave equation. The mathematical consequences of extending this model into infrared frequencies are also discussed.


Wharmby A.W.,711th Human Performance Wing | Bagley R.L.,University of Texas at San Antonio
International Journal of Engineering Science | Year: 2014

A mathematical model of viscoelasticity employing fractional order derivatives is adapted and applied to model the dielectric behavior of materials while remaining consistent with thermodynamic principles. The model is then incorporated into Maxwell's equations using techniques from viscoelasticity. The modified Maxwell's equations are found to yield a fractional order wave equation that is solved analytically and is found to remain consistent with dissipative and dispersive phenomena.


Hokr B.H.,Texas A&M University | Bixler J.N.,Texas A&M University | Cone M.T.,Texas A&M University | Mason J.D.,Texas A&M University | And 7 more authors.
Nature Communications | Year: 2014

Random lasers are a developing class of light sources that utilize a highly disordered gain medium as opposed to a conventional optical cavity. Although traditional random lasers often have a relatively broad emission spectrum, a random laser that utilizes vibration transitions via Raman scattering allows for an extremely narrow bandwidth, on the order of 10 cm-1. Here we demonstrate the first experimental evidence of lasing via a Raman interaction in a bulk three-dimensional random medium, with conversion efficiencies on the order of a few percent. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the complex spatial and temporal dynamics of nonlinear processes in turbid media. In addition to providing a large signal, characteristic of the Raman medium, the random Raman laser offers us an entirely new tool for studying the dynamics of gain in a turbid medium. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Thompson G.L.,Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education | Roth C.C.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio | Dalzell D.R.,711th Human Performance Wing | Kuipers M.,711th Human Performance Wing | Ibey B.L.,711th Human Performance Wing
Journal of Biomedical Optics | Year: 2014

The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (nm) are created in the plasma membrane in contrast to larger diameter pores ( nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2 kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calciuminduced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis. © 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

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