Chippenham, United Kingdom
Chippenham, United Kingdom

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Mainwaring M.C.,Lancaster University | Hartley I.R.,Lancaster University | Bearhop S.,University of Exeter | Brulez K.,University of Birmingham | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Biogeography | Year: 2012

Aim The laying of eggs and the building of a nest structure to accommodate them are two of the defining characteristics of members of the class Aves. Nest structures vary considerably across avian taxa and for many species the structure of the completed nest can have important consequences both for parents and their offspring. While nest characteristics are expected to vary adaptively in response to environmental conditions, large-scale spatial variation in nest characteristics has been largely overlooked. Here, we examine the effects of latitudinal variation in spring temperatures on nest characteristics, including insulatory properties, and reproductive success of blue tits, Cyanistes caeruleus, and great tits, Parus major. Location Great Britain. Methods Nests and reproductive data were collected from seven study sites, spread over 5° of latitude. The nest insulatory properties were then determined before the nests were separated into nest base material and cup lining material. Results As spring temperatures increased with decreasing latitude, the mass of the nest base material did not vary in either species, while the mass of the cup lining material and nest insulatory properties decreased in both species. This suggests that in response to increasing temperatures the breeding female reduces the mass of the cup lining material, thereby maintaining an appropriate microclimate for incubating and brooding. The mean first egg date of both species advanced with decreasing latitude and increasing spring temperatures, although clutch size and brood size at hatching and fledging did not vary. Main conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that the nest-construction behaviour of birds varies in response to large-scale spatial variation in ambient temperatures. Therefore, nest composition reliably indicates environmental conditions and we suggest that studies of nest structure may be sentinels for the early signs of rapid climate change. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

William Pitt Sotheby’s International Realty announced today that The Residences at 66 High Street, a new development of luxury condominiums listed for sale with the firm, was honored this year with the Home Building Industry (HOBI) Awards’ “Project of the Year,” the highest honor the organization bestows on new developments. The project also received expected recognitions in the categories of Best Condominium Community, Best Condominium Unit and Best Historic Rehab, but the “Project of the Year”—one of the HOBI’s “Grand Awards”—came as a surprise to the builders behind the development, the Horton Group. The Residences at 66 High Street, which consists of a full renovation of a 130-year-old mill building with respect to its historic character, was selected for the prestigious award over a number of other new development projects across the entire state of Connecticut, as well as additional developments in Westchester County, N.Y., and in Rhode Island. William Pitt Sotheby’s International Realty also received a HOBI Award in the category of Best Ad for The Residences at 66 High Street. The HOBI Awards is Connecticut’s most prestigious housing industry program, acknowledging distinction in new construction, land development, remodeling, sales and marketing, and home financing. A panel of HOBI judges with expertise in home building select the winners each year by reviewing applications submitted by Home Builders Association (HBA) members, and by visiting homes and neighborhoods across the state. “We were humbled and honored by the wonderful surprise of receiving the HOBI’s top honor for the night in new developments,” said William Pitt Sotheby’s International Realty Guilford brokerage manager Kathy Mitchell. “The Horton Group’s masterful work defines the architectural quality embodied in these awards. We are proud to be a part of this team and to represent this exceptional project.” Kathy Mitchell attended the annual award ceremony dinner alongside listing agents Nikki Travaglino, Anne Scandone and Peter W. Cowie, as well as Horton Group developer Kenny Horton and other team members Earl Horton, Jason Burke, James Blank, Bill Belanardo, Bruno Riga and designers Maryellen Sullivan and Susana Smith. Also in attendance were Ron Nault and Robert Grzywacz from the architectural firm of Luchs/DeCarlo and Doll, Inc. Now almost complete, the converted mill building maintains its original roots by keeping its locally recognized exterior largely intact, while boasting luxurious townhouse interior styles with modern design and upscale amenities including LED lighting, state-of-the-art HVAC, sound systems, Smart Home technology and spacious kitchens with high-quality appliances. In addition to the mill building, which also includes an attached Quonset hut structure, three new buildings are being constructed on the site. Collectively, the buildings include townhouses and single-level, two-bedroom units ranging in size from 1,850 to 2,600 square feet. With 57 approved condos, the development represents over $56 million in inventory for Guilford. The Horton Group is a full service general construction and maintenance firm founded in 2000. The Connecticut-based company specializes in a wide range of commercial, industrial and residential projects from restoring historic buildings to developing new properties. The HOBI Awards dinner, attended by approximately 900 guests representing every corner of the state, took place the evening of November 16, 2016 at the Aqua Turf Country Club in Plantsville. For more information on The Residences at 66 High Street, please visit its website here. Founded in 1949, William Pitt and Julia B. Fee Sotheby's International Realty manages a $3.9-billion portfolio with more than 1,000 sales associates in 28 brokerages spanning Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Westchester County, New York. William Pitt and Julia B. Fee Sotheby's International Realty is the largest Sotheby's International Realty(R) affiliate globally and the 28th-largest real estate company by sales volume in the United States. A full-service real estate firm headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut, William Pitt and Julia B. Fee Sotheby's International Realty provides ancillary services including commercial services through its affiliation with Building and Land Technology, a second-generation development company based in Stamford, Connecticut; William Pitt Insurance Services; and an award-winning global relocation division. For more information, visit the website at williampitt.com. Sotheby's International Realty's worldwide network includes approximately 19,000 sales associates located in approximately 850 offices throughout 65 countries and territories.


du Feu C.R.,66 High Street | du Feu R.,Lancaster University
Ringing and Migration | Year: 2014

Suggestions have been made for sexing Marsh Tits using wing length (adjusted for age) as the sole criterion. Data from a long-term, single-site study are presented here and indicate that nearly 10% of Marsh Tits will be incorrectly sexed using this criterion. Further summary data are presented from the BTO national ringing data set. The merits and problems of assigning sex of birds based on the wing-length criterion are discussed. Potential biases in sex-based analyses are described and recommendations for assigning sex are made. © 2014 © 2014 British Trust for Ornithology.


Bridgens R.,66 High Street
Disability and Health Journal | Year: 2015

Throughout the 30 years of postpolio syndrome (PPS) research, there have been many puzzling anomalies in the data and not enough information to make sense of them. It is therefore welcome that Winberg et al have examined physical activity in relation to life satisfaction, sex and age. They hypothesized that activity would decrease with age and found the opposite. This result is not so surprising as Ostlund et al found that vitality was associated with older age and that younger age was associated with more pain, increasing physical fatigue, decreasing sleep quality and reducing activity. This commentary will examine past postpolio research with unexpected results in order to describe a subgroup of patients who may be more susceptible to overusing muscles and have particular exercise and activity needs. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Surgey J.,9 Southwell Rise | Du Feu C.R.,66 High Street | Deeming D.C.,University of Lincoln
Condor | Year: 2012

The lining material is a key element of bird nests, serving primarily as insulation for the adult, eggs, and/or chicks, but collection of such material has an energetic cost. Our study investigated the nest-building effort of four species of tit (Paridae) in an English wood by quantifying the use of colored wool-like artificial material in nest lining from 2000 to 2010. We recorded the distances that birds carried the material from source to nest for each nest as an indirect measure of the energetic cost of collecting nest material to individual birds. Birds did not always use nest material from the nearest source to their nest, and some birds collected material from two, three or four well-separated sources. There was no detectable color preference in choice of material, and few birds traveled more than 200 m to gather the material. Use of the material appeared to depend on the species. Within defined areas around material dispensers not all individual Great Tits (Parus major) used the artificial material, and, for all species examined, the proportion of birds using the material declined with increasing distance between source and nest. Use of artificial material suggested that selection of nest materials was probably opportunistic but also reflected the preference of these species for a wool-like nest lining. © The Cooper Ornithological Society 2012.


PubMed | 66 High Street
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Disability and health journal | Year: 2015

Throughout the 30 years of postpolio syndrome (PPS) research, there have been many puzzling anomalies in the data and not enough information to make sense of them. It is therefore welcome that Winberg et al have examined physical activity in relation to life satisfaction, sex and age. They hypothesized that activity would decrease with age and found the opposite. This result is not so surprising as Ostlund et al found that vitality was associated with older age and that younger age was associated with more pain, increasing physical fatigue, decreasing sleep quality and reducing activity. This commentary will examine past postpolio research with unexpected results in order to describe a subgroup of patients who may be more susceptible to overusing muscles and have particular exercise and activity needs.


Du Feu C.R.,66 High Street
Avian Biology Research | Year: 2012

Cleaning passerine nestboxes after birds have fledged is widely thought to remove parasites such as fleas. Experiments are now described that examine the value of cleaning such nests after use.


Maccoll A.D.C.,University of Nottingham | du Feu C.R.,66 High Street | Wain S.P.,54 The Pines
Ibis | Year: 2014

Woodland birds have experienced widespread population declines across Europe, resulting partly from a decrease in management practices such as coppicing. Increasing fuelwood demand may reverse the decline of coppicing, making it timely to attempt a fuller understanding of its effects. Here, the impact of coppicing on year-round habitat use by adults and juveniles of 16 songbird species was quantified from a quasi-experimental study over 32 years (1978-2009) in Treswell Wood, Nottinghamshire, UK. Habitat use was inferred using capture rates from more than 10 000 h of mist-netting (> 25 000 captures) and detailed information on coppicing. Capture rates varied with coppice age in different ways: (1) increases as coppice aged (e.g. Marsh Tit Poecile palustris, juvenile Eurasian Treecreepers Certhia familiaris); (2) declines as coppice aged (e.g. Eurasian Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus, Great Tit Parus major); (3) peaks in capture rates at intermediate coppice age (i.e. 5-15 years) (e.g. Garden Warbler Sylvia borin, Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus, adult Treecreepers); and (4) a peak at intermediate ages, followed by a decline, before an increase in use again at the oldest coppice ages (i.e. > 20 years) (e.g. Common Blackbird Turdus merula, Eurasian Blackcap Sylvia atricapilla, Eurasian Bullfinch Pyrrhula pyrrhula). Responses to coppice age were similar in different seasons, although Willow Tits Poecile montana showed little preference during breeding but avoided older coppice at other times. Juveniles and adults often differed in their responses to coppice age. The analyses reveal patterns in habitat use that are relevant to woodland management and conservation policy. They suggest that a mosaic of age structures in woodland is beneficial to a wide range of woodland species, and that management should consider the requirements of all age-classes of birds at different times of year. © 2014 British Ornithologists' Union.

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