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Salt Lake City, UT, United States

Kasatkin A.V.,V O Almazjuvelirexport | Plasil J.,ASCR Institute of Physics Prague | Marty J.,5199 East Silver Oak Road | Agakhanov A.A.,Saint Petersburg State University | And 2 more authors.
Mineralogical Magazine | Year: 2014

Nestolaite (IMA 2013-074), CaSeO3·H2O, is a new mineral species from the Little Eva mine, Grand County, Utah, USA. It is named in honour of the prominent Italian mineralogist and crystallographer Fabrizio Nestola. The new mineral was found on sandstone matrix as rounded aggregates up to 2 mm across and up to 0.05 mm thick consisting of tightly intergrown oblique-angled, flattened to acicular crystals up to 30 μm long and up to 7 μm (very rarely up to 15 μm) thick. Nestolaite associates with cobaltomenite, gypsum, metarossite, orschallite and rossite. The new mineral is light violet and transparent with a white streak and vitreous lustre. The Mohs hardness is 21/2. Nestolaite is brittle, has uneven fracture and perfect cleavage on {100}. The measured and calculated densities are Dmeas. = 3.18(2) g/cm3 and Dcalc. = 3.163 g/cm3. Optically, nestolaite is biaxial positive. The refractive indices are α = 1.642(3), β = 1.656(3), γ = 1.722(6). The measured 2V is 55(5)° and the calculated 2V is 51°. In transmitted light nestolaite is colourless. It does not show pleochroism but has strong pseudoabsorption caused by high birefringence. The chemical composition of nestolaite (wt.%, electronmicroprobe data) is: CaO 28.97, SeO2 61.14, H2O (calc.) 9.75, total 99.86. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of 4 O a.p.f.u. (atoms per formula unit) is Ca0.96Se1.02O3 ··H2O. The Raman spectrum is dominated by the Se-O stretching and O-Se-O bending vibrations of the pyramidal SeO3 groups and O-H stretching modes of the H2O molecules. The mineral is monoclinic, space group P21/c, with a = 7.6502(9), b = 6.7473(10), c = 7.9358(13) Å, β = 108.542 (12)°, V = 388.37(10) Å 3 and Z = 4. The eight strongest powder X-ray diffraction lines are [dobs in Å (hkl) (Irel)]: 7.277 (100)(100), 4.949 (110)(37), 3.767 (002)(29), 3.630 (200)(58), 3.371 (020)(24), 3.163 (2̄02)(74), 2.9783 (1̄ 21)(74) and 2.7231 (112)(31). The crystal structure of nestolaite was determined by means of the Rietveld refinement from the powder data to Rwp = 0.019. Nestolaite possesses a layered structure consisting of CaΦ-SeO3 sheets, composed of edge-sharing polyhedra. Adjacent sheets are held by H bonds emanating from the single (H2O) group within the sheets. The nestolaite structure is topologically unique. © 2014 The Mineralogical Society. Source


Kasatkin A.V.,V O Almazjuvelirexport | Nestola F.,University of Padua | Plasil J.,ASCR Institute of Physics Prague | Marty J.,5199 East Silver Oak Road | And 10 more authors.
Mineralogical Magazine | Year: 2013

Two new minerals - manganoblodite (IMA2012-029), ideally Na 2Mn(SO4)2·4H2O, and cobaltoblodite (IMA2012-059), ideally Na2Co(SO4) 2·4H2O, the Mn-dominant and Co-dominant analogues of blodite, respectively, were found at the Blue Lizard mine, San Juan County, Utah, USA. They are closely associated with blodite (Mn-Co-Ni-bearing), chalcanthite, gypsum, sideronatrite, johannite, quartz and feldspar. Both new minerals occur as aggregates of anhedral grains up to 60 mm (manganoblodite) and 200 mm (cobaltoblodite) forming thin crusts covering areas up to 2×2 cm on the surface of other sulfates. Both new species often occur as intimate intergrowths with each other and also with Mn-Co-Ni-bearing blodite. Manganoblödite and cobaltoblodite are transparent, colourless in single grains and reddish-pink in aggregates and crusts, with a white streak and vitreous lustre. Their Mohs' hardness is ∼21/2. They are brittle, have uneven fracture and no obvious parting or cleavage. The measured and calculated densities are Dmeas = 2.25(2) g cm-3 and D calc = 2.338 g cm-3 for manganoblodite and D meas = 2.29(2) g cm-3 and Dcalc = 2.347 g cm-3 for cobaltoblodite. Optically both species are biaxial negative. The mean refractive indices are a = 1.493(2), β = 1.498(2) and γ = 1.501(2) for manganoblodite and a = 1.498(2), β = 1.503(2) and γ = 1.505(2) for cobaltoblodite. The chemical composition of manganoblodite (wt.%, electron-microprobe data) is: Na2O 16.94, MgO 3.29, MnO 8.80, CoO 2.96, NiO 1.34, SO3 45.39, H2O (calc.) 20.14, total 98.86. The empirical formula, calculated on the basis of 12 O a.p.f.u., is: Na1 9 6(Mn0.44Mg0.29Co0.14Ni0.06)Σ0. 93S2.03O8·4H2O. The chemical composition of cobaltoblodite (wt.%, electron-microprobe data) is: Na2O 17.00, MgO 3.42, MnO 3.38, CoO 7.52, NiO 2.53, SO3 45.41, H2O (calc.) 20.20, total 99.46. The empirical formula, calculated on the basis of 12 O a.p.f.u., is: Na1.96(Co0.36Mg0.30Mn 0.17Ni0.12)Σ0.95S2.02O 8·4H2O. Both minerals are monoclinic, space group P21/a, with a = 11.137(2), b = 8.279(1), c = 5.5381(9) Å, β = 100.42(1)°, V = 502.20(14) Å3 and Z = 2 (manganoblödite); and a = 11.147(1), b = 8.268(1), c = 5.5396(7) Å, β = 100.517(11)°, V = 501.97(10) Å3 and Z = 2 (cobaltoblödite). The strongest diffractions from X-ray powder pattern [listed as (d,Å (I)(hkl)] are for manganoblödite: 4.556(70)(210, 011); 4.266(45)(2̄01); 3.791(26)(2̄11); 3.338(21)(310); 3.291(100)(220, 021), 3.256(67)(211, 1̄21), 2.968(22)(2̄21), 2.647(24)(4̄01); for cobaltoblödite: 4.551(80)(210, 011); 4.269(50)(2̄01); 3.795(18)(2̄11); 3.339(43)(310); 3.29(100)(220, 021), 3.258(58)(211, 1̄21), 2.644(21)(4̄01), 2.296(22)(1̄22). The crystal structures of both minerals were refined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to R1 = 0.0459 (manganoblödite) and R1 = 0.0339 (cobaltoblödite). © 2013 The Mineralogical Society. Source


Kampf A.R.,Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County | Plasil J.,ASCR Institute of Physics Prague | Kasatkin A.V.,Russian Academy of Sciences | Marty J.,5199 East Silver Oak Road
Mineralogical Magazine | Year: 2015

The new minerals bobcookite (IMA 2014-030), NaAl(UO2)2(SO4)4•18H2O and wetherillite (IMA 2014-044), Na2Mg(UO2)2(SO4)4•18H2O, were found in the Blue Lizard mine, San Juan County, Utah, USA, where they occur together as secondary alteration phases in association with boyleite, chalcanthite, dietrichite, gypsum, hexahydrite, johannite, pickeringite and rozenite. Bobcookite descriptive details: lime green to greenish-yellow massive veins and columnar crystals; transparent; vitreous lustre; bright greenish-white fluorescence; pale greenish yellow streak; hardness (Mohs) 2; brittle; conchoidal fracture; no cleavage; moderately hygroscopic; easily soluble in cold H2O; densitycalc = 2.669 g cm-3. Optically, biaxial (-), α = 1.501(1), β = 1.523(1), γ = 1.536(1) (white light); 2Vmeas. = 78(1)°; 2Vcalc. = 74°; dispersion r < v, moderate. Pleochroism: X colourless, Y very pale yellow-green, Z pale yellow-green; X < Y < Z. EDS analyses yielded the empirical formula Na0.97Al1.09(U1.02O2)2(S0.98O4)4(H2O)18. Bobcookite is triclinic, P1, a = 7.7912(2), b = 10.5491(3), c = 11.2451(8) Å , α = 68.961(5), β = 70.909(5), γ = 87.139(6)°, V = 812.79(8) Å3 and Z = 1. The structure (R 1 = 1.65% for 3580 F o > 4σF) contains [(UO2)(SO4)2(H2O)] chains linked by NaO4(H2O)2 octahedra to form layers. Hydrogen bonds to insular Al(H2O)6 octahedra and isolated H2O groups hold the structure together. The mineral is named for Dr Robert (Bob) B. Cook of Auburn University, Alabama, USA. Wetherillite descriptive details: pale greenish-yellow blades; transparent; vitreous lustre; white streak; hardness (Mohs) 2; brittle; two cleavages, {101} perfect and {010} fair; conchoidal or curved fracture; easily soluble in cold H2O; densitycalc = 2.626 g cm-3. Optically, biaxial (+), α = 1.498(1), β = 1.508(1), γ = 1.519(1) (white light); 2Vmeas. = 88(1)°, 2Vcalc. = 87.9°; dispersion is r < v, distinct; optical orientation: Z = b, X ⧠a = 54° in obtuse β; pleochroism: X colourless, Y pale yellow-green, Z pale yellow-green; X < Y ≈ Z. EDS analyses yielded the empirical formula Na1.98(Mg0.58Zn0.24Cu0.11Fe2+ 0.09)∑1.02(U1.04O2)2(S0.98O4)4(H2O)18. Wetherillite is monoclinic, P21/c, a = 20.367(1), b = 6.8329(1), c = 12.903(3) Å, β = 107.879(10)°, V = 1709.0(5) Å3 and Z = 2. The structure (R 1 = 1.39% for 3625 F o > 4σF) contains [(UO2)(SO4)2(H2O)] sheets parallel to {100}. Edge-sharing chains of Na(H2O)5O polyhedra link adjacent uranyl sulfate sheets forming a weakly bonded three-layer sandwich. The sandwich layers are linked to one another by hydrogen bonds through insular Mg(H2O)6 octahedra and isolated H2O groups. The mineral is named for John Wetherill (1866-1944) and George W. Wetherill (1925-2006). © 2015 Mineralogical Society. Source


Kampf A.R.,Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County | Plasil J.,ASCR Institute of Physics Prague | Kasatkin A.V.,Russian Academy of Sciences | Marty J.,5199 East Silver Oak Road | Cejka J.,National Museum
Mineralogical Magazine | Year: 2015

The new minerals fermiite (IMA2014-068), Na4(UO2)(SO4)3·3H2O and oppenheimerite (IMA2014-073), Na2(UO2)(SO4)2·3H2O, were found in the Blue Lizard mine, San Juan County, Utah, USA, where they occur together as secondary alteration phases in association with blödite, bluelizardite, chalcanthite, epsomite, gypsum, hexahydrite, krohnkite, manganoblodite, sideronatrite, tamarugite and wetherillite. Fermiite descriptive details: pale greenish-yellow prisms; transparent; vitreous lustre; bright greenish- white fluorescence; white streak; hardness (Mohs) 2 brittle; conchoidal fracture; no cleavage; slightly deliquescent; easily soluble in RT H2O; densitymeas = 3.23(2) g cm-3; densitycalc = 3.313 g cm-3. Optically, biaxial (+), α = 1.527(1), (β= 1.534(1), γ = 1.567(1) (white light); 2Vmeas = 51(1)°, 2Vcalc = 50°; dispersion r < v, distinct. Pleochroism: X, Y = colourless, Z = pale greenish yellow; X= Y < Z. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analyses yielded the empirical formula Na3.88(U1.05O2)(S0.99O4)3(H2O)3. Fermiite is orthorhombic, Pmn21, a = 11.8407(12), b = 7.8695(5), c = 15.3255(19) Å, V= 1428.0(2) Å3 and Z = 4. The structure (R1 = 2.21% for 1951 Io > 3σl) contains [(UO2)(SO4)3] chains that are linked by bonds involving five different Na-O polyhedra to form a framework. The mineral is named for Italian-American theoretical and experimental physicist Dr. Enrico Fermi (1901-1954). Oppenheimerite descriptive details: pale greenish-yellow prisms; transparent; vitreous lustre; bright greenish-white fluorescence; white streak; hardness (Mohs) 2 slightly sectile; three good cleavages, {110}, {011} and {101}; irregular fracture; slightly deliquescent; easily soluble in RT H2O; densitycalc = 3.360 g cm-3. Optically, biaxial (+), α = 1.537(1), β = 1.555(1), y = 1.594(1) (white light); 2Vmeas. = 72(2)°, 2Vcalc = 70°; dispersion is r > v, moderate, inclined; optical orientation: X ≈ {101}, Z ≈ [111]; pleochroism: X very pale greenish yellow, Y pale greenish yellow, Z greenish yellow; X < Y < Z. EDS analyses yielded the empirical formula Na1.94(U0.97O2)(S1.02O4)2(H2O)3. Oppenheimerite is triclinic, P1, a = 7.9576(6), 6 = 8.1952(6), c = 9.8051 (7) Å, α = 65.967(5)' β = 70.281 (5), y = 84.516(6)°, V= 549.10(8) Å3and Z = 2. The structure (Rx = 3.07% for 2337 I0 > 3σI) contains [(UO2)(SO4)2(H2O)] chains that are linked by bonds involving two different Na-O polyhedra to form a framework. © 2015 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin/Boston. Source


Kampf A.R.,Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County | Plasil J.,ASCR Institute of Physics Prague | Kasatkin A.V.,V O Almazjuvelirexport | Marty J.,5199 East Silver Oak Road
Mineralogical Magazine | Year: 2014

The new mineral belakovskiite (IMA2013-075), Na7(UO 2)(SO4)4(SO3OH)(H2O) 3, was found in the Blue Lizard mine, Red Canyon, White Canyon district, San Juan County, Utah, USA, where it occurs as a secondary alteration phase in association with blödite, ferrinatrite, kröhnkite, meisserite and metavoltine. Crystals of belakovskiite are very pale yellowish-green hair-like fibres up to 2 mm long and usually no more than a few mm in diameter. The fibres are elongated on [100] and slightly flattened on {021}. Crystals are transparent with a vitreous lustre. The mineral has a white streak and a probable Mohs hardness of ∼2. Fibres are flexible and elastic, with brittle failure and irregular fracture. No cleavage was observed. The mineral is readily soluble in cold H2O. The calculated density is 2.953 g cm -3. Optically, belakovskiite is biaxial (+) with α=1.500(1), β=1.511(1) and γ=1.523(1) (measured in white light). The measured 2V is 87.1(6)° and the calculated 2V is 88°. The mineral is non-pleochroic. The partially determined optical orientation is X ≈ a. Electron-microprobe analysis provided Na2O 21.67, UO3 30.48, SO3 40.86, H2O 6.45 (structure), total 99.46 wt.% yielding the empirical formula Na6.83(U1.04O2)(SO4) 4(S0.99O3OH)(H2O)3 based on 25 O a.p.f.u. Belakovskiite is triclinic, P1̄, with a=5.4581(3), b=11.3288(6), c=18.4163(13) Å, α=104.786(7)°, β=90.092(6)°, γ=96.767(7)°, V=1092.76(11) Å 3 and Z=2. The eight strongest X-ray powder diffraction lines are [dobs Å (I)(hkl)]: 8.96(35)(002), 8.46(29)(011), 5.19(100)(1̄01,101,1̄10), 4.66(58)(013,1̄02,1̄1̄0,110), 3.568(37)(120,023,005,03̄3), 3.057(59)(01̄6,11̄5,1̄31), 2.930(27)(multiple) and 1.8320(29)(multiple). The structure, refined to R 1=5.39% for 3163 Fo > 4σF reflections, contains [(UO2)(SO4)4(H2O)]6- polyhedral clusters connected via an extensive network of Na-O bonds and H bonds involving eight Na sites, three other H2O sites and an SO 3OH (hydrosulfate) group. The 3-D framework, thus defined, is unique among known uranyl sulfate structures. The mineral is named for Dmitry Ilych Belakovskiy, a prominent Russian mineralogist and Curator of the Fersman Mineralogical Museum. © 2014 The Mineralogical Society. Source

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