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Worcester, MA, United States

Schildkrout B.,5 Lake Ave. N. | Schildkrout B.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | Benjamin S.,5 Lake Ave. N. | Benjamin S.,University of Massachusetts Medical School | Lauterbach M.D.,University of Maryland Baltimore County
Academic Medicine | Year: 2016

Increasing the integration of neuroscience knowledge and neuropsychiatric skills into general psychiatric practice would facilitate expanded approaches to diagnosis, formulation, and treatment while positioning practitioners to utilize findings from emerging brain research. There is growing consensus that the field of psychiatry would benefit from more familiarity with neuroscience and neuropsychiatry. Yet there remain numerous factors impeding the integration of these domains of knowledge into general psychiatry. The authors make recommendations to move the field forward, focusing on the need for advocacy by psychiatry and medical organizations and changes in psychiatry education at all levels. For individual psychiatrists, the recommendations target obstacles to attaining expanded neuroscience and neuropsychiatry education and barriers stemming from widely held, often unspoken beliefs. For the system of psychiatric care, recommendations address the conceptual and physical separation of psychiatry from medicine, overemphasis on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and on psychopharmacology, and different systems in medicine and psychiatry for handling reimbursement and patient records. For psychiatry residency training, recommendations focus on expanding neuroscience/neuropsychiatry faculty and integrating neuroscience education throughout the curriculum. Psychiatry traditionally concerns itself with helping individuals construct meaningful life narratives. Brain function is one of the fundamental determinants of individuality. It is now possible for psychiatrists to integrate knowledge of neuroscience into understanding the whole person by asking, What person has this brain? How does this brain make this person unique? How does this brain make this disorder unique? What treatment will help this disorder in this person with this brain? Copyright © by the Association of American Medical Colleges. Source


Shimasaki Y.,5 Lake Ave. N. | Pan N.,5 Lake Ave. N. | Messina L.M.,University of Massachusetts Medical School | Li C.,5 Lake Ave. N. | And 5 more authors.
Circulation Research | Year: 2013

RATIONALE:: Mitochondria, although required for cellular ATP production, are also known to have other important functions that may include modulating cellular responses to environmental stimuli. However, the mechanisms whereby mitochondria impact cellular phenotype are not yet clear. OBJECTIVE:: To determine how mitochondria impact endothelial cell function. METHODS AND RESULTS:: We report here that stimuli for endothelial cell proliferation evoke strong upregulation of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). Analysis in silico indicated increased UCP2 expression is common in highly proliferative cell types, including cancer cells. Upregulation of UCP2 was critical for controlling mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ) and superoxide production. In the absence of UCP2, endothelial growth stimulation provoked mitochondrial network fragmentation and premature senescence via a mechanism involving superoxide-mediated p53 activation. Mitochondrial network fragmentation was both necessary and sufficient for the impact of UCP2 on endothelial cell phenotype. CONCLUSIONS:: These data identify a novel mechanism whereby mitochondria preserve normal network integrity and impact cell phenotype via dynamic regulation of UCP2. © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc. Source

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