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Le Touquet – Paris-Plage, France

Moreira M.,GSK Vaccines | Cintra O.,GSK Vaccines | Harriague J.,4Clinics | Hausdorff W.P.,GSK Vaccines | Hoet B.,GSK Vaccines
Vaccine | Year: 2016

Brazil introduced the 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV, Synflorix™ GSK Vaccines) in the routine childhood immunization program in 2010 with a 3 + 1 schedule (with catch-up for children <2 years-old). This review represents the first analysis of the overall impact of a second-generation pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on nasopharyngeal carriage and all the major pneumococcal disease manifestations in a single, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine-naïve, developing country. A total of 15 published articles and 13 congress abstracts were included in the analysis. In children <5 years-old, studies showed a positive impact of PHiD-CV on the incidence of vaccine-type and any-type invasive pneumococcal disease (including decreases in pneumococcal meningitis morbidity and mortality), on pneumonia incidence and mortality, and on otitis media. Nasopharyngeal carriage of vaccine-type and any-type pneumococci decreased after the primary doses, with no early signs of replacement with other pathogens. Finally, herd protection against vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumonia in unvaccinated subjects was shown in some studies for some age groups. In conclusion, pneumococcal disease decreased after the introduction of PHiD-CV into the Brazilian national immunization program. Further follow-up is needed to evaluate the long-term overall impact of PHiD-CV in the Brazilian population. © 2016 GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals SA. Source


Roush J.K.,Kansas State University | Cross A.R.,University of Florida | Renberg W.C.,Kansas State University | Dodd C.E.,and Hills Inc. | And 7 more authors.
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association | Year: 2010

Objective-To evaluate the effects of a food supplemented with fish oil omega-3 fatty acids on weight bearing in dogs with osteoarthritis. Design-Randomized, double-blinded, controlled clinical trial. Animals-38 client-owned dogs with osteoarthritis examined at 2 university veterinary clinics. Procedures-Dogs were randomly assigned to receive a typical commercial food (n = 16) or a test food (22) containing 3.5% fish oil omega-3 fatty acids. On day 0 (before the trial began) and days 45 and 90 after the trial began, investigators conducted orthopedic evaluations and force-plate analyses of the most severely affected limb of each dog, and owners completed questionnaires to characterize their dogs' arthritis signs. Results-The change in mean peak vertical force between days 90 and 0 was significant for the test-food group (5.6%) but not for the control-food group (0.4%). Improvement in peak vertical force values was evident in 82% of the dogs in the test-food group, compared with 38% of the dogs in the control-food group. In addition, according to investigators' subjective evaluations, dogs fed the test food had significant improvements in lameness and weight bearing on day 90, compared with measurements obtained on day 0. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-At least in the short term, dietary supplementation with fish oil omega-3 fatty acids resulted in an improvement in weight bearing in dogs with osteoarthritis. Source


Fritsch D.A.,and Hills Inc. | Allen T.A.,and Hills Inc. | Allen T.A.,7015 College Blvd | Dodd C.E.,and Hills Inc. | And 5 more authors.
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association | Year: 2010

Objective-To determine the effects of feeding a diet supplemented with fish oil omega-3 fatty acids on carprofen dosage in dogs with osteoarthritis. Design-Randomized, controlled, multisite clinical trial. Animals-131 client-owned dogs with stable chronic osteoarthritis examined at 33 privately owned veterinary hospitals in the United States. Procedures-In all dogs, the dosage of carprofen was standardized over a 3-week period to approximately 4.4 mg/kg/d (2 mg/lb/d), PO. Dogs were then randomly assigned to receive a food supplemented with fish oil omega-3 fatty acids or a control food with low omega-3 fatty acid content, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks later, investigators made decisions regarding increasing or decreasing the carprofen dosage on the basis of investigator assessments of 5 clinical signs and owner assessments of 15 signs. Results-Linear regression analysis indicated that over the 12-week study period, carprofen dosage decreased significantly faster among dogs fed the supplemented diet than among dogs fed the control diet. The distribution of changes in carprofen dosage for dogs in the control group was significantly different from the distribution of changes in carprofen dosage for dogs in the test group. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results suggested that in dogs with chronic osteoarthritis receiving carprofen because of signs of pain, feeding a diet supplemented with fish oil omega-3 fatty acids may allow for a reduction in carprofen dosage. Source


Fritsch D.,and Hills Inc. | Allen T.A.,and Hills Inc. | Dodd C.E.,and Hills Inc. | Jewell D.E.,and Hills Inc. | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine | Year: 2010

Background: Food supplemented with fish oil improves clinical signs and weight bearing in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA). Objective: Determine whether increasing the amount of fish oil in food provides additional symptomatic improvements in OA. Animals: One hundred and seventy-seven client-owned dogs with stable chronic OA of the hip or stifle. Methods: Prospective, randomized clinical trial using pet dogs. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive the baseline therapeutic food (0.8% eicosopentanoic acid [EPA] 1 docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) or experimental foods containing approximately 2- and 3-fold higher EPA+DHA concentrations. Both veterinarians and owners were blinded as to which food the dog received. On days 0, 21, 45, and 90, serum fatty acid concentrations were measured and veterinarians assessed the severity of 5 clinical signs of OA. At the end of the study (day 90), veterinarians scored overall arthritic condition and progression of arthritis based on their clinical signs and an owner interview. Results: Serum concentrations of EPA and DHA rose in parallel with food concentrations. For 2 of 5 clinical signs (lameness and weight bearing) and for overall arthritic condition and progression of arthritis, there was a significant improvement between the baseline and 3X EPA+DHA foods (P=.04,.03,.001,.0008, respectively) but not between the baseline and the 2X EPA+DHA foods. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Increasing the amount of fish oil beyond that in the baseline food results in dosedependent increases in serum EPA and DHA concentrations and modest improvements in the clinical signs of OA in pet dogs. © 2010 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Source


Leventhal P.S.,4Clinics
European Science Editing | Year: 2013

Although best known as writers of regulatory documents, medical writers also help craft journal articles, medical communication texts and medical education materials. Professional publication writers are medical writers who specialise in writing journal articles. Publication writers provide a valuable service by helping authors avoid the many pitfalls that can cause a manuscript to be rejected. Not only do they help authors write clear, concise and convincing text, they also provide a naïve, unbiased scientific perspective and, importantly, help successfully guide authors through the writing and peerreview processes. Source

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