4070 NW 7th Lane

Delray Beach, FL, United States

4070 NW 7th Lane

Delray Beach, FL, United States

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ValdeS A.,California State Polytechnic University, Pomona | Ornelas-Gatdula E.,California State Polytechnic University, Pomona | Dupont A.,4070 NW 7th Lane
Biological Bulletin | Year: 2013

The color pattern of benthic opisthobranch sea slugs (Mollusca: Gastropoda) appears to play an important defensive role, and numerous species seem to have aposematic (warning) colorations. Color pattern is an important trait for opisthobranch identification-this conclusion is based on the assumption that most species have limited color variation. For those species in which color variation is recognized, the reasons for the variation remain unknown. In this paper we study Philinopsis pusa, a benthic putative species of opisthobranch sea slug with a broad range of color pattern. Lighter individuals appear to be camouflaged on the white sand environment in which the animals are typically found, whereas darker individuals appear conspicuously different from their background. Because of its broad color variation, P. pusa has been subdivided into different species. Animals were collected and observed in the Bahamas during a 6-year span. The color pattern of the specimens was subjectively classified into five phenotypic classes. Two mitochondrial genes (16S, CO1) were sequenced from 41 specimens. The association between color pattern, body length, burrowing escaping behavior, and the genetic structure of the population was investigated. We found two genetically distinct groups in the target population but no significant association between color pattern and genetic structure. Additionally, there was no significant association between color pattern and ontogeny or defensive behavior in these organisms. The present paper suggests that general assumptions on the biological and evolutionary role of color in opisthobranchs need to be carefully evaluated. © 2013 Marine Biological Laboratory.


Espinoza E.,California State Polytechnic University, Pomona | Du Pont A.,4070 NW 7th Lane | Valdes A.,California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
ZooKeys | Year: 2013

A new species of Melibe is described based on two specimens collected in Florida. This new species is well differentiated morphologically and genetically from other species of Melibe studied to date. Te four residue deletions in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 protein found in all previously sequenced tropical species of Melibe sequenced (and Melibe rosea) are also present in this new species. These deletions do not appear to affect important structural components of this protein but might have fitness implications. This paper provides the first confirmed record of Melibe in the tropical western Atlantic Ocean. © Erika Espinoza et al.


Ornelas-Gatdula E.,California State Polytechnic University, Pomona | Dupont A.,4070 NW 7th Lane | Valdes A.,California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society | Year: 2011

Several western Atlantic species of Chelidonura have been described mainly based on differences in colour pattern. Sequence data from two mitochondrial [cytochrome oxidase I (COI), 16S] genes and a nuclear [histone 3 (H3)] gene have revealed that all colour forms previously recognized from across the Caribbean, Bahamas, and Bermuda belong to the same species, Chelidonura berolina. However, several specimens from the Bahamas are genetically and morphologically distinct and are herein described as a new species, Chelidonura normani sp. nov. Externally, C. normani can only be distinguished from C. berolina by the morphology of the posterior end of the body and not by colour pattern. Both C. berolina and C. normani are genetically and morphologically distinct from the eastern Atlantic species Chelidonura africana, but the split between C. berolina and C. normani predates the split between C. berolina and C. africana. All three species differ in their protoconch morphology, which suggests different developmental modes. Furthermore, all three species display a broad variation in colour pattern, which raises questions on the biological significance of colour in this group. The reasons for the divergence between C. berolina and C. normani remain unknown but could be related to the complex geological history of the western Atlantic. © 2011 The Linnean Society of London.


Espinoza E.,California State Polytechnic University, Pomona | DuPont A.,4070 NW 7th Lane | Valdes A.,California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
American Malacological Bulletin | Year: 2014

Molecular and morphological evidence revealed the existence of two cryptic species of Costasiella Pruvot-Fol, 1951 in the Bahamas. A review of the literature indicates that one of these species is the western Atlantic widespread species Costasiella ocellifera (Simroth, 1895), whereas the other species is undescribed. The new species is externally similar to Costasiella ocellifera but can be distinguished by the absence of a penial stylet and the radular morphology. Phylogenetic and species delimitation analyses confirm that the new species is genetically distinct from C. ocellifera. The new species has only been found in the Bahamas, but there are possible records from Cuba and Jamaica. © 2014, BioOne. All rights reserved.


Jensen K.R.,Universitetsparken 15 | Krug P.J.,California State University, Los Angeles | Dupont A.,4070 NW 7th Lane | Nishina M.,Yokohama shi
Journal of Molluscan Studies | Year: 2014

The history of the genus Costasiella is summarized. A new species of Costasiella, C. arenaria n. sp., from Lake Worth, Florida, USA is described. For comparative purposes specimens of C. formicaria (Baba, 1959) from Japan and serial sections of C. pallida Jensen, 1985 from Hong Kong have also been examined. These three species, like the type species C. virescens Pruvot-Fol, 1951 and C. coronata Swennen, 2007 from Thailand are not associated with the green alga Avrainvillea, which is the food of most known species of the genus. They share several morphological characters, i.e. pharynx without muscular pouches, radular teeth with narrow, smooth, blade-shaped cusps and short bases, unarmed penises and branches of albumen gland entering the cerata. A molecular phylogeny of 14 species of Costasiella based on four genes (mitochondrial COI and 16S rRNA and nuclear 28S rRNA and H3) supports morphological findings that the species not associated with the green alga Avrainvillea form a monophyletic group within the genus. © 2014 The Author.

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